100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 27, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- ow-

I
OWNWA

We Have Just Received

SOCIETY BRAND

SUITS

and Top Coats for Spring

Some

Very

Snappy

SUITS and TOPCOATS

In Belted Back Effects

Come in and see our new line of Spring Hats and
Furnishings.
We make Suits to your measure from $16.50 up.
NEXT TO ORPHEUM
FOR ELECTRIC REPAIRS
OF ALL KINDS CALL
Wshlenaw Electric Shop
The Shop of Quality
It its not Right we make it Right
Phone 273 200 East Washington St.
I CULTIVATING THE CLOTHES SENSE-

W adhams & Co.

I

State Street

Arcade

BACIOBYS TO WORK FARMS

COLLEGES OF COUNTRY
AID REDCROSS WORK
SEND AMBULANCESAND DRIVERS
TO FRANCE IN LARGE
NUMBERS

Your Floral Needs-
Are BEST SA VISFIED By Us
PHONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION
-=COUSINS & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Members of Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association
When You Break Your Glasses
Go to Hailler & Fuller's
STATE STREET JEWELERS
Because you get prompt service and Have Your
Lenses Accurately Ground.

WHOLE STATE IN ACTION TO
NATION IN CON-
FLICT

AID

Safer Than
Currency to Carry
has often been remarked when talking of,
S K. N. & K. TRAVELERS' CHECKS -
Experienced Travelers Use Them
Checks not countersigned may be replaced if lost.
Convenient for the college man trav- Considering the protection afforded, -
eling individually or with his team, their cost is insignificant.
Denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100 at apremiumofSOc.
on one hundred dollars' worth.
Get them from your local bank or write for full particulars.
KnautjNajob &Kulne
EQUITABLE BUILDING NEW YORK CITY -
:tll11111111l~lllllul111111IC1l1llllllllilllilIlIIlllllllilllllllllilllllIIIIIIl11IIIIIII

Lansing, April 26.-Bay City is the
first city in the state to work out a
formal organization of its school boys
for joint military training and mobil-
ization for planting and care of food
crops, in line with the suggestion of
Nathan F. Simpson of the food prepar-
edness board of the state.
The Bay City plan has the endorse-
meht of the parents of 300 boys and
has been fostered by the northeastern
development bureau, the board of
trade and the school board of the city.
To have 10 Companies of 30 Boys
The plan provides for the organiza-
tion of the boys into 10 companies of
30 boys each, with a captain over
each company and a major over each
battalion. The boys are to have uni-
forms, military drill, and medical at-
tention, and are to be sent into the
agricultural districts to help the farm-
ers. They will have camps organized
along military lines in which they will
live, and will work not more than six
hours daily. Their pay wil be limited
to 15 cents an hour, of which not to
exceed $12 a month will go to each boy.
The balance will apply on the cost of
establishing the system.
The war board has undertaken to
find instructors and drill masters for
all colleges desiring to institute mil-
itary drill. It will also order for
home guard and college companies
dummy rifles of the identical shape
and weight of Springfield rifles, for
drilling. Sporting rifles and ammuni-
tion will be used by the organizations
on guard duty. These cmpanies will
be drilled in army tactics so that the
members will be well advanced when
the companies go into actual service.
War Board Aids in Recruiting
The war board is lending its assist-
ance to the state for forming commit-
tees to recruit the national guard to
war strength, to build up home guard
companies and to encourage men of
education and experience to enroll in
officers' reserve training camps.
At Owosso an organization has been
formed to encourage the latter pro-
ject and an enrollment of a dozen men
is anticipated. In Lansing a campaign
has just been opened to enroll 100 men
for Fort Sheridan. Michigan Agricul-
tural college will send about 50 to
take this training. The remainder will
be urged to "do their bit" on the
farms of the state.
Home Guards Being Organized
Home guards are being formed in
the state at the rate of five or six a
day. Lansing is clothing its firemen
and picked men of the factories of
the city with police power that they
may give the city protection when the
artillery batteries are called into ser-
vice. Lansing leads the state in re-
cruits and half a dozen a day are being
added to the artillery batteries be-1
sides the number of men enlisted for
the army and navy.
Presbyterian C. E. to Hold Banquet
The Christian Endeavor of the Pres-
byterian church will hold its annual
banquet at the church at 7 o'clock to-
morrow evening.I
Polish your floors with Old English
Floor Wax. Phone 237. C. H. Major1
& Co.-Adv.;
I can duplicate any lens. J. L.
Chapman, Optrometrist and Jeweler.c

While there is at present an en-
thusiastic movement among students
of the University of Michigan to or-
ganize several corps of ambulance
drivers for the battle fronts of France,
other colleges and universities have
had these divisions organized for some
time, and many of them have already
sent several companies across.
There are already more than 200
automobile ambulances now in Paris,
having been donated by Dartmouth,
Harvard, Yale, Stanford, Princeton,
and Chicago.
Harvard Plays Big Part
Harvard thus far has carried the
big burden of the work. At the out-
break of the war Harvard subscribed
$10,000 for equipping the American
ambulance hospital in Paris. In June,
1915, Harvard took over one of the
British base hospitals with 32 sur-
geons and 75 nurses. That hospital
has been maintained by Harvard ever
since. Harvard has also sent an ex-
pedition to fight typhoid fever in
Servia.
The Harvard men in the service
have carried over 700,000 wounded
men, their section leaders have been
cited 16 times for valuable and effi-
cient work, 54 of their men have been
given the Croix de Guerre for brav-
ery, and two, the Medaille Militaire.
Three have been killed in action.
Entertainments Furnish Expenses
Throughout the different colleges
those men who are not able to supply
their expenses of transportation, are
furnished them by the proceeds of war
lectures, and college vaudeville per-
formances. If one university is un-
able to supply their entire corps with
money to get to France, another of the
universities engaged in the work pools
their finances with them, and the
money is thus secured.
Next to Harvard, Dartmouth is one
of the most prominent colleges en-
gaged in this work, for the students
there have already sent two corps of
22 men each across to France and
have nearly completed a third.
Cornell and Illinois Send Men
At the University of Illinois, 50 men
have already applied and have been
accepted in the corps. Cornell has
sent one complete ambulance corps
to France and is now forming another.
Several thousand dollars have been
subscribed for the purchase of cars
and equipment, and besides the corps
which has been enlisted several addi-
tional students are going to fill gaps
in other services along the lines.
Princeton is at present organizing
a complete corps, and will probably
send them to Paris by May 8. While
Princeton has sent several ambulances
to the front, and many Princeton stu-
dents have left for that service, this
is the first division of Princeton men
to go in a body.
Out in Berkeley, the University of
California has organized an ambu-
lance corps, with equipment and cars,
which will sail from New York May 4
to Paris.
Yale Sends Division of 22 Men
Yale has given a number of cars to
the ambulance service in France, and
a large number of Yale men have gone
over to join any division in which they
were needed. The school recently
dispatched a division of 22 men, and

Hutzel's
MAIN AND LIBERTY

I

MIMMMMIIS mm

I

I

i

TYPEWRITERS
For Reat or Sale

li--

I

SPRING

Typewriting
Multigraphing
] ieopwaphing

Hats & Caps

IHamilton Bushioss College
State and Wiliam
several more like companies are now
being organized.
The qualifications for entering the
service do not include any physical
examinations. All men who apply or
start organizing a corps should know
how to drive a Ford car, and have a
practical knowledge of the engine and
its parts, though this is not absolutely
necessary. The expenses of the men
must be met by the men themselves,
and will amount to approximately
$350.
Take Oath of Allegiance to Allies
The oath of allegiance to the cause
of the allies will be administered to
all who enter the service, and to dis-
prove the impression that all men who
swear allegiance to the allies are un-
true to the United States, Secretary
of War Baker has written several
deans of colleges, telling them that
the work is of the most heroic and
patriotic character, and that these men
may be later used by the United
States when it sends an army across
to France. The men will be sent only
in units of 22, and according to the
French law, no man will be accepted
who is German or of German extrac-
tion.

No way to do it but to see as many
sible that are excellently made-of
colors-and of graceful lines.
Coming to the Hutzel Shop often
what to wear and how to wear it.

In new Shades and
Shapes

clothes as pos-
well-combined
will show you

THE

Varsity Toggery

SHOP

1107 So. Univ. 1107 So. Univ

I

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
System

near Ann Arbor, will spend the month
of May in Washington, where she will
take a course in first aid and nursing
at the military camps near Chevy
Chase.
One more German has signified his
intentions of becoming a citizen in
this community. Frederick J. Gross
filed his application for citizenship pa-
pers at the county clerk's office Wed-
nesday.
After taking testimony for two days
the rehearing of the Kempf contested
will case in the probate court has been
adjourned until next Wednesday.
SOPI ENGINEERS TO FINE
ALL ABSENT FROM MEETINGS
Sophomore engineers at their as-

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Co.
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

GORD ON-' -cin.
ARROW
COLLAR
TOPS AND BANDS ARE CURVE CUT
TO PIT THE SHOULDERS. 2107r30c
CLUT ODC

City News

Estimates on any kind of Painting Have your shoes full-soled in leath-
or Decorating, cheerfully given. Phone er or Neolin. We specialize in this
237. C. H. Major & Co.-Adv. work. 0. G. Andres. 220 So. State. 13-4
4IC D V E R TI S I L e a ntCo p y
Qaf ndStudents' i SI I Spl tr
140 Ota Suppy StVG

WANTED
WANTED-Competent men with sales
experience. Vacation or permanent
work. Good men can make from $6
to $15 per day. Call on Frank W.
Kurtz, Whitney Hotel, Friday 11 to
7. 26-7
WANTED-Furnished house by young
married couple, for summer school.
Must be modern and near campus.
Address, Box M, care Daily. 25-6-7
WANTED-Festival tickets for Satur-
day evening. Five together or two
and three separate. Call 991-R, be-
tween 10 and 12 o'clock. 27-8
WANTED-At once, a colored Porter.
Call at 707 Oxford Road or Phone
357. 25-6-7
WANTED-A' second maid; sorority
house. Phone 368. 25-6-7

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-One May Festival ticket
for Friday afternoon and Saturday
afternoin, Saturday evening, also for
Thursday evening. Main floor. Row
13. Phone 536-J or 110-M. 27
FOR SALE-$3.00 pre-festival coupon
for $2.00. Inquire at Daily. 25-6-7
LOST
LOST-Unique Silver Bar Pin about
three inches long. Finder phone
Schaeberle & Son's Music Store.
254-F-1. 26-7
LOST-Loose-leaf black covered note
book. Reward. Call 2460. 27
LOST-Don't wish for that lost artiole
-recover it by an ad in The Mich-
igan Daily.

Miss Wiona Saunders, secretary of
the Ann Arbor Civic association, re-
ceived a letter from the United States
department of agriculture at Washing-
ton yesterday asking that the associa-
tion find out thetnames of all persons
in this city that are engaged -in the
following businesses: Wholesale gro-
ceries, mail order houses which handle
foodstuffs, general warehouses, refin-{
ing sugar, freezing fish, refining lard,
and roasting coffee. The information
will be used by the department of
agriculture in connection with the na-
tion-wide movement to ascertain the
food supply of the country at the pres-,
ent time.
The Ann Arbor chapter of the Amer-
ican Red Cross has received an invita-
tion to attend the dedication of the
memorial to the women who took part
in the Civil war to be held May 12 in'
Washington.
The city council will hold a special
meeting at 7:30 o'clock tonight in its
roofns in the city hall to confirm the'
mayor's appointment of the successor
to the late Christiana Schlenker who
was formerly supervisor of the Sec-
ond ward in order to fill the vacancy
before the board of supervisors meets
on May 3. The council will also vote
on the liquor licenses that have been
received since, the last council meet-
ing.
Mrs. William Drumm, who has
charge of the Edison club *for girls

sembly yesterday morning passed
resolutions put before them by

the
the

committee on attendance at class as-
semblies, levying a fine on men ab-
sent from class meetings.
M. H. Ayers, G. S. Hodges, and J.
R. St. Clair were nominated as can-
didates for the honor committee. Ma-
jor Castle spoke to the class on the
present military situation for college
students.
The class will hold a spring party
May 4 and the tickets are now on sale
at the Union.
OHIO STATE INSTRUCTORS TO
SERVE ON AGRICULTURE BOARD
Columbus, O., April 26.-Thirty-
eight instructors at Ohio State have
been given places on the agricultural
division of the council for national de-
fense by a committee appointed by
Governor James M. Cox. Of this num-
ber, 11 have been appointed to the staff
of the committee and 27 have taken
up county agent work.
TRAINING WOMEN OF MINNESOTA
TO EDIT ALL PUBLICATIONS
Minneapolis, Minn., April 26.-Wom-
en of the University of Minnesota are
being trained to manage and edit the
college publications so that they may
take the places of men who have gone
to serve their country.

i.a

Do You Know

THAT GRINNELL BROS. CAN SAVE YOU MONEY ON ANYTHING
In the Realm of Music !

ASK TO SEE THE NEW "RECORD LITE"
FOR VICTROLAS
116 S0. MAIN ST.
Try our Record Approval Service

Phone 1707

Phone 1707

1 . .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan