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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 27, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY,

FOR
MEN
ONLY

TAKE YOUR
Amatuer Finishing to a Reliable Photographer
who has an established reputation and you will be assured of
Results that will not be a disappointment.
L Y N D O N ' S 719 N. University Ave

SPECIAL

SALE

A

ON

Established 1905, and
Growing bigger and better every day.

r -.

NO

SLIGHTLY

MALCOLMS TAILORING
Just what you want in pattern and quality, is awaiting
ar selection here.

E .Liberty St.
Malcolm Block

J1. K. MALCOLM

FRATERINITIES
We havelunsurpassed accomodations for group photographs
MAIN STUDIOS
1546-48 Broadway New York, N.Y
Perfect Portraitures
l "Amateur Work Handled in a Pro-
s - fesional Way.

WILSON SAYS PUBLIC
MAY PROBE OFFICIALS
WOULD NOT DENY "INDISPUT-
ABLE RIGHTS" TO
CRITICIZE
Washington, April 26.-President
Wilson, speaking of the so-called
espionage bill now pending in con-
gress, today declared that, while he
approved-the legislation he was utterly
opposed to any censorship which
would would deny the people "their
indisputable rights to criticize their
own public officials."
The president's comment was con-
tained in a letter to Arthur Brisbane,
New York editor, which said:
"I approve this legislation, but I
need not assure you and those inter-
ested in it, that whatever action the
congress may decide upon, as far as
I am personally concerned, I shall
not expect or permit any part of this
law to apply to'me or any of my of-
ficial associates, or in any way to be
used as a shield against criticism.
"I can imagine no greater disservice
to the country than to establish a sys-
tem of censorship that would deny to
the people of a free republic like our
own their indisputable right to criti-
cize their own public officials."
Nevada First to.
Complete Quota

Pop. Mat. wed. wk.April 23
Best Seats $1.50 R $R Nights
DETROIT
BERNARD SHAW'S COMEDY
Getting Married"

ARCADE
Shows at 3:00; 6:®; 3.:..; 9:3.

I

ATHLETIC

GOODS

zoc Uhless Otherwise Specified.
Phoe s g44-M.
Thurs.-26-Joan Sawyer in "Love's
Law" ; and Christie Comedy.
Fri.-27-Lionel Barrymore in "His
Father's Son" ; and Figman Corn-
edy. x 5c.
Sat.-28-Lillian Walker in "Kittle
MacKay," and Mrs. Vernon Castle
in "Patria." isc.

SOILED

SHEEHAN

& Co.

(19 B. Liberty St.

PHOWNC948-W

iTUDEDAKER MOTOR CARS

Orpheum Theatre
Matinees, $:00-3:30; Evening, 6:45,
8:z5, 9:30.
Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Fri.-27-Mae Murray in "On Rec-
ord." Also Paramount Comedy.
Evening 15c.
Sun.-Mon.-29-3o-Marguerite Clark in
Sat.-28-Wm. S. Hart in "The Gun
Fighter." Also Triangle Comedy,
"His Deadly Undertaking." even-
ing 15c.
"The Fortunes of Fifi." Also Holmes
Travels. x5c.
Rae Theatre

YOUR NEIGHBOR
If he threw $25 to $80 in the river? But you will
lose that much if you fail to

W a
1WHAT WOULD YOU CALL1

H. F. GAYLORD,

i

I

ne 1927

311 Maynard Street

INVESTIGATE

...

WHAT'S GOING OIL

I

Today
3 o'clock-Anti-tuberculosis society
meets in room 435 Natural Science
building.;
7:30 o'clock-Latin-American club
meets in Lane hall.
7:30 o'clock-Baptist Guild social in
Baptist church.
9 o'clock-Senior engineer dance at
Armory.i
9 o'clock-Crease dance at the Mich-
igan Union.
9 o'clock-Red Cross ball in com-
bined gymnasiums.
Tomorrow
6 o'clock-Craftsmen club banquet
in Masonic Temple.
6 o'clock-Christian Endeavor ban-
quet at Presbyterian church.
7:30 o'clock-Upper Peninsula club
meets in basement of Lane hall.
8 o'clock-Dr. R. F. De Bois speaks
to Women's Research club in Natural
Science auditorium.
U-Notices
The Mimes of the Michigan Union
will meet at 4 o'clock this afternoon
at the Union.
The Junior lit baseball team will
practice at 3:30 o'clock this afternoon
on south Ferry field.
Fresh lits will drill at 4 o'clock this
afternoon in front of Waterman gym-
nasium.
Ballot boxes for the election of Y.
M. C. A .officers on Saturday will be
placed in the west corridor of the
University Library and in Lane hall.
Students who have not received the
Union questionnaires should call for
th/m today at the Union.
Soph lits will drill at 4 o'clock this
afternoon in front of Waterman gym-
nasium.
NO OFFICIAL ACTION TOWARD
HOLDING COMDENCEMENT EARLY
"No official action has been taken
in regard to the plan of holding Com-
mencement a week early this year,"
said Dean John R. Effinger yesterday
in denial of a rumor to that effect.
"The Regents may possibly consider
the matter in their meeting tomorrow,"
he concluded..
Orders from the government con-
cerning the establishment of a mili-
tary training camp in Ann Arbor this
summer have not been received by
University officials and no definite
plans have been formulated.

REPORT THREATENED ATTACKS
ON EMBASSY IN PETROGRAD
Washington, April 26.-Threatened
attacks on the American embassy at
Petrograd were described in detailed
reports from Ambassador Francis to
the state department today under date
of April 24. The ambassador stated
he reported the incidents which he
considered insignificant in ordersto al-
lay fear that sensational reports may
have created the impression that ord-
er is not in force in Petrograd. He
said good order prevails and life and
property are safe.
The ambassador's report follows:
"On Sunday evening the ambassador
was informed that crowds of excited
people with a black flag were threat-
ening to attack the American embassy,
having been moved thereto by a vio-
lent speech of a socialist named Selen-
in.. At the embassy he found a guard
of seven soldiers. Presently a further
small detachment of soldiers arrived.
Ten minutes later messengers stated
that the crowd had been dispersed.
On Monday Monsieur Miliukoff tele-
phoned the ambassador that an Italian
anarchist had addressed the crowd on,
Neveski Prospect, arousing them by
stating that an Italian named Muni
had been executed in the United States.
The government acted promptly to
protect the embassy, arresting three of
the crowd and dispersing the others."
PLAN TRIPS FOR STUDENTS
OF SUMER SESSION COURSES
Trips to Niagara Falls and Put-in-
Bay under the auspices of Prof. I. D.
Scott will be a part of the curriculum
of the summer session courses in ge-
ology and zoology. University stu-
dents and their friends will be per-
mitted to take the trips and to attend
the illustrated lectures which will pre-
cede each excursion.
The trip to Niagara, costing about
$15 complete, will give almost 36 hours,
at the falls, time enough to see all the
natural phenomena and to visit the
great manufacturing plants located
there.
The trip to Put-in-Bay is taken at
only a slight expense of $2.00.
Abe Hart, '17, Il With Measles '
Abe S. Hart, '17, president of the
Student council, is ill with German
measles. Hart is at present quaran-
tined in his room at 1601 Cambridge
road.
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

Leads All States in Furnishing
Required Number of Enlist-
ments

Its

Washington, April 26.- Nevada is
the first state to furnish her full quota
of recruits to the United States army,
the war department announced today.
With 20 enlistments yesterday Nev-
ada's total reached 137, 11 more than
her pro rata share of recruits.
Pennsylvania led in recruiting yes-
terday with 181 men. Illinois was
next with 167, Michigan third with 116,
and New York fourth with 107. Illinois
is still leading with a total of 3,192
recruits since April 1. Recruits ac-
cepted for the regular army since the
big drive started April 1, now number
33,792, of whom 1, 684 were accepted
yesterday. The numbers contributed
by each state since April 1, are:
Alabama 483, Arizona, 42, Arkansas
271, California 1,068, Colorado 244,
Connecticut 322, Delaware 12, District
of Columbia 121, Florida 338, Georgia
1,417, Idaho 182, Illinois 3,359, Indiana
2,538, Iowa 909, Kansas 1,009, Ken-
tucky 825, Louisiana 556, Maine 149,
Maryland 101, Massachusetts 879,
Michigan 1,418, Minnesota 562, Missis-
sippi 388, Missouri 1,359, Montana 141,
Nebraska 600, Nevada 137, New Hamp-
shire 55, New Jersey 772, New Mex-
ico 33, New York 2,784, North Carolina
391, North Dakota 66, Ohio 1,234, Ok-
lahoma 556, Oregon 838, Pennsylvania
3,022, Rhode Island 96, South Carolina
248, South Dakota 199, Tennessee 551,
Texas 1,466, Utah 320, Vermont 18,
Virginia 413, Washington 376, West
Virginia 345, Wisconsin 355, Wyoming
62.
FOUR YEARS IN COLLEGE-
, AND HAVE NEVER BEEN KISSED

=TODAY=
Paramount Pictures Presents
"Jim the Penman"
With HAROLD LOCKWOOD
CHRISTY COMEDY
Admission roc
Goodhew Floral Co.
225 E. Liberty. Phone 1521
Everything in the line of
fresh cut flowers.
Good variety of flowering
plants.
Greenhouses-Observatory and
Volland St. Phone, 170-M.'
SUB-COMMITTEE TO
DRAW UP FOOD LAW
Are Ready to Recommend Appropria-
tions to Enable Starting of an
Immediate Survey
Washington, April 26.-A sub-com-
inittee to act with the department of
agriculture in drafting emergency food
legislation was appointed by the sen-
ate agricultural committee today. The
members are Senators Gore, Smith of
Georgia, Smith of South Carolina,
Page of Vermont, and Kenyon of Iowa.
Senator Gore stated that the com-
mittee is ready to recommend ap-
propriations to enable the department
to start immediately to survey the
food situation and to extend the de-
partmental market news service. J.
S. Cullinan of Houston, representing
tbe Texas industrial congress; put for-
ward the plan of commandeering the
vast grazing areas in Texas and Okla-
homa for cultivation. An offer by the
Illinois Central railroad to let the'
land beside its right of way be used
for gardening purposes was laid be-
fore the committee.
There is opportunity in The Michi-
gan Daily Ads. Read them.
Try The Daily for service.

Guaranteed the same as a new tire and in addition
Guaranteed 3500 Miles

I

I

GE HAF-ShE TIRES

Puncture Proof

Office

THE l-- COMPANY
International Rubber
Sales Co.

113 S. Main
Service Station

Phone 432-M
We will in-
spect your tires
free.

W. F. LETTS, Manager
SOLE AGENTS FOR
WASHTENAW COUNTY

I818 S. Main

CORNELL PRESIDENT DECLARES
CONSCRIPTION IS NECESSARY
Ithaca, N. Y., April 26.-That selec-
tive conscription must be employed to
assure the United States success in
the war was the assertion of President
Schurman of Cornell in an address
yesterday on "The Present Crisis."
"Germany is the best organized na-
tion in the world today, and. we are
one ofhe worst," said President
Schurman. "Our power will be par-
alyzed in such a conflict if we are
not organized. Knowing that the vol-
unteer system will lead to the blund-
ers and failures of the past, we must
adopt selective conscription and be
ready for a war which may last longer
than is now expected."
FRESH LITS MEET FOR DRILL
AT WATERMAN GYMNASIUM
Fresh lits will meet at 4 o'clock
this afternoon at Waterman gymnas-
ium for drill. The men of the first
company will keep their regular plac-
es in line and the new men will form
another company. There should be at
least 300 men out this evening if the
increase keeps up to its usual rate.
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

I Have Them

Special Shoes
Naval Reserves

in Black

and same Style in
Tan for
Army or Drilling

19 Cincinnati Seniors, 10 of
Girls, Make Startling
Disclosures

Them

......
mum

I PROMPT SERVICE, FULL SATISFACTION U

Cincinnati, 0., April 26.-Nineteen
seniors of the University of Cincin-
nati have never been kissed; and 10
of the 19 are girls.
A questionnaire was recently sub-
mitted to the members of the 1917
class and some astonishing replies
were made. Evasive answers were
made by the "co-eds" but the men
frankly stated their ideas by such re-
turns as, "Space does not permit me
to chronicle the frequency of my par-
ticipation in that event" and f'Sure
thing."
The girls' answers were quite en-
lightening, "Yes, I'm human," "Not
since entering college," "Oh Lord,"
"Oceans of times," "Yes-Papa," "Most
every day," and some less startling
statements were haughtily hurled at
the head of the questioner. One girl
said she was "probably engaged" ,and
a man said, "Three-fourths do."
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

MAJ~i % I

3-7 and 8:30 P.M.
Matinees 100.0 Nights ISO

__VLESARAH BE NH ARDT

119 East Liberty Street

I,

PROMVPT SERVICE, L FULL SATISFACTION
TO OUR CUSTOMERS
It is on this basis that we do business.

In "MOTHERS OF FRANCE"

Written By Jean Richepi.

A GREAT OBJECT LESSON TO THE MOTHERS OF AMERICA

I

ARCADE JEWELER
CARL F. BAY

Fildom's supreme offering. The greatest actress in the world in the greatest screen drama of the greatest
war. A pathetic, vivid, vital play showing French womanhood and manhood at its best and bravest. The
picture you can never forget.
A PERCENTAGE OF THE RECEIPTS GO TO THE BENEFIT OF FRENCH WAR RELIEF FUND.
- - . --.. -

I'

Nickels Arcade

Phone 152-W

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