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April 27, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I Mhil. VIK.f1Uf-N VLY

1* * * * * * * * * * * * * *' * *

ULUU niU iIU
E ACCEPTED PLAY

AT THE THEATERS

SCollege Losing Many Men Who
Are Responding to Nation 's Call
Universities and colleges throughout their membership caused by enlist-

PREPARE EXHIBITS IN NATURAL FARRELL HAS LITTLE HOPE
SCIENCE BUILDING FOR GUESTS FOR INTERCLASS RELAYS

ESENT CRISIS UPSETS PLANS
TO PRODUCE MOVING
PICTURE
lthough a definite selection of a
ario in the Comedy club's movie
test has been made, the winners
* not receive the $50 prize offered.
to the present crisis the commit-+
on student dramatics has deemed
iexpedient to produce the play.
len Shoenfield, '18, and Roy H.
"en, '19, are the aut ors of the
cted plot which Is titled "Lawson
97." The play contrasts the stu-
t life of 20 years ago with that of
present day, bringing in a num-
of the old traditions and customs.
t of the scenes are laid in Ann
pr .
Tad the production gone through
planned," said Morrison Wood, '17,
s would have been an innovation.
ollege dramatics. This is the first.
mpt to be made by a university
;vatic club to put on a moving plc-
e play written and acted entirely
students. All arrangements are
ctically complete for the filming if
thing should happen to make its
duction seem advisable."
OFESSOR ALLEN SPEAKS TO
SENIOR ENGINEER ASSEMBLY
'rof. John R. Allen gave a talk on
experiences as an engineer in
rico and Cuba, in the senior en-
eer assembly yesterday morning.
f. H. E. Riggs discussed the em-
yment bureau and advised every
,neer to register. He also advised
engineers to refrain from enlist-
until their course is completed, as
government will not need engi-
rs for six months yet.
EGON WOMEN STUDENTS TO
WORK UNDER UNION RULES
Eugene, Oregon, April 26.-Women
dents at Oregon using their spare
e for outside work have adopted
.n rules of employment. A maxi-
m working day of three hours and
alf, and minimum wage of ten cents
r hour have been decided upon. All
es of activity usually entered by
Is supporting themselves have been
ssified and a definite charge assign-
for each.
UIS EICH WILL READ FROM
MARK TWAIN SUNDAY EVENING
Louis Ech, of the oratory depart-
nt, will give several readings from
,rk Twain at the meeting of the Stu-
its' society of the Unitarian church
6:30 o'clock Sunday evening in the
urch parlors at the corner of Huron
d State streets.
There will be one more regular
eting of the society on Sunday,
y 6, and following this there will be
e'ries of out-door meetings.
rhis is the right time to have any
d of painting done. Phone 237. C.
Major & Co.-Adv.
tugs perfectly cleaned, washed, and
ed without injury. Koch & Henne. ft

TODAY
Majestic - Sarah Bernhardt in
"Mothers of France."
Arcade-Lionel Barrymore in
"His Father's Son" and Fig.
mian comedy.
Orpheum-Mae Murray in "On
Record," and Paramount com-
edy.
Rae-Joihn Mason in "Jim the
Penman." Christy comedy.

AT THE MAJESTIC

The fact that Madame Sarah Ber-
hardt appears in the Jean Richepin
film "Mothers of France," now show-
ing at the Majestic theater, is not the
only reason for interest in the play.
"Mothers of France" is a symbol of
the spirit of the French republic in
the war.
The New York World says, "Emotion-
ally the play could not have been more
powerful or appealing if expressed in
spoken dialogue, and the ability of the
camera to overcome the restrictions of
the regular stage gave the scenes a
realism which brought their message
home to every spectator,"
"Mothers of France" will be at the
Majestic today and tomorrow.
AT THE ARCADE
The Arcade today will show "His
Father's Son," starring Lionel Barry-
more supported by Irene Howley. As
the rich man's son who bet he could
hold a job for a month, Lionel Barry-
more produces some good comedy, and
there are plenty of good laughs. Mr.
Barrymore, by his work in "The Yel-
low Streak," and "Dorlin's Divorce,"
has won a host of admirers.
Tickets for today's performance, for
the benefit of the Ann Arbor Women's
club, are on sale at Goodyear's Drug
store and the Farmers' and Mechan-
ics State Street bank.
For live, progressive, up-to-date ad-
vertising use The Michigan Daily.

the country are losing students by:
the hundred because of the call issuedI
by the government for military andt
agricultural men.1
Several agricultural colleges and
departments are on the verge of clos-
ing because of the small enrollment oft
students which in many cases, is too
limited to allow the proper organiza-
tion of classes. As well as a decrease
in students, the colleges are feeling a
marked shortage of instructors in agri-
culture as a result of numerous
leaves-of-absence issued to allow ex-
perts opportunity to organize food con-.
servation work in the various states.
Michigan has lost about 300 men,
Yale, 200; Cornell, 355; Illinois, 250;
Ohio State, 500; Princeton, 25 for "Y"
work alone, and practically every
other university has been reduced by
the same proportion. The number of
men leaving is about . equally divided
between those enlisting and the ones.
who are going to do agricultural work.
A few are going to do service with
the American legions in Europe and
others are going into other govern-
ment service in the United States.
Practically every university and col-
lege as well as many secondary.
schools have voluntary or compulsory
military drill, and many have special
courses in military organization and
strategy under direction of United
States army officers. The corps of
the universities are organized under
the provision made for the reserve of-
ficers' training corps. Michigan now
has about 3,000 students drilling, Co-
lumbia has 1,700, Dartmouth 1,095,
Pennsylvania 1,800, and other uni-
versities have similar numbers.
Intercollegiate athletics have been
discontinued by several of the eastern
universities, Michigan, Harvard, Cor-
nell, Yale, and Princeton heading the
movement. Wisconsin has been the
only western university to take similar
action. More time can be devoted to
military training without the counter-
attraction of athletics. Physical train-
ing has been replaced by compulsory
drill in a few colleges.
Fraternities at some universities
may be compelled to close their houses

ment. At Washington 80 per cent of
two fraternities have left school. At
Colorado three fraternities discon-1
tinued proposed house construction#
plans because of the war.
Training camps are claiming manyz
of those who are leaving college, for1
the students realize the value of the1
instruction received at the various1
forts. Although the training under-1
gone at the universities is highly de-.
sirable, the intensive three months'1
course offered by the government is1
more satisfactory.
DECLARES VOLUNTEER SYSTEM
OF RECRUITING UNDEMOCRATIC
Princeton, N. J., April 26.-That the
volunteer system of recruiting men for"
the army is the most inefficient and
most undemocratic of methods, as has
been proven by England's experience,
was the assertion of Captain Leslie
Vickers in an address to Princeton
students on his personal experiences
in the world war.
Due to the criminal negligence of a
narrow administration, the flower of
England's young manhood has been
sacrificed in cold blood, said Captain
Vickers.
JANITRESS AND ASSISTANTS
OFFER AID TO RED CROSS BALL
As an evidence of their willingness
to do their bit for their country in time
of war, Mrs. Stella Blackburn, janit-
ress at Barbour gymnasium and her
three assistants, Miss 1A. Hanison, Miss
A. Robinson, and Miss Sladdi Zebbs
have offered their services for the Red
Cross ball given in Barbour gymnas-
ium tonight.
COLUMBIA DEAN LEAVES TO
ASSIST IN WAR DEPARTMENT
New York City, April 26.-Frederick
Paul Kessel, dean of Columbia college,
has left the university to assist in the
administrative offices of the war de-
partment. He has been granted a leave
of absence for the present year and
will probably not resume his univer-

Every effort of the six departments
in the Natural Science building is be-
ing put forth to prepare the building
for the spring exhibit next week at
which visitors to Ann Arbor for the
May Festival will find considerable en-
tertainment between concerts.
The botany department has among
many other things of interest, the sub-
terranean experimental laboratories,
the incubator rooms with controlling
temperature, photographic rooms, her-
bariums for lower and higher plants,
and the museum. Besides these will
be the extensive botanical garden ex-
hibit, specimens brought from the
University botanical gardens.
At this exhibit growing flower plants
wNIll be given to visitors.

My diamonds are fine quality and Third base has been Detroit's weak
reasonably priced. J. L. Chapman, spot thus far this season and the
Jeweler. 113 Main St.-Adv. wed-eod Tigers have made the poorest spring
showing in years.
Get your shoes fixed at Paul's Place, y
611 E. William St. 5t1 Patronize Daily Advertisers.

Prospects for interclass relays this
season are extremely low. Coach
Steve Farrell is unable to compete
with military training and the balmy
spring weather in an effort to capture
the interest of nimble-limbed youths.
Lack of support has proved too much
for the relays.
Oscar Vitt Reports to Tigers Sunday.
Detroit, April 26.-Oscar Vitt, star
third baseman of the Detroit Ameri-
cans, has come to terms with Presi-
dent Navin. Vitt is expected to join
the Detroit club at Chicago in time to
play Sunday. It was announced both
Navin and Vitt "had made conces-
sions." Vitt rejected a contract which
offered him a salary of $5,000. It was
reported he wanted $6,000.

44I
tI
A.a

as a result of the great decrease In sity activities until after the war.

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BIGGEST LINE OF SPRING FURNISHINGS
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