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April 27, 1917 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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RSITY BASEBALL MEN 8 Teams Enter
MEET ALL-FRESH TODAY Baseball League

REGENTS MAY ACT UPON
CONFERENCE QUESTION

COACH LUNDGREN'S ATHLETES TO
TAKE ON YEARLINGS FOR
FIRST CLASH
Rain and cold weather in succession
forced the postponement of the Var-
sity-All-fresh baseball game from last
Wednesday afternoon until tomorrow.
It had been planned to hold two con-
tests during the week, the first with
the yearlings and the second with the
All-campus team. The cold wave has

Four Games Scheduled for Saturday;
Nine Games Next
Week
Eight class teams have been formal-
ly entered in the baseball league, with
the certainty that two other teams
will be ready to play. The entries fol-
low: Senior lits, junior lits, soph lits,
fresh lits, senior engineers, junior eng-
ineers, soph engineers, fresh engin-
eers, all-dents, and architects.
Play will start Saturday on South
Ferry field, with four games scheduled
for the afternoon, as follows: Senior

delayed the former so that it will have lits vs. fresh lits; senior engineers vs.
to be played tomorrow. The coach ex-'fresh engineers; junior lits vs. soph
pects to give the Varsity a practice lits; and dents vs. architects. Time of
game today as a preliminary workout play will be mutually agreed upon by
for the freshmen the next day. the managers of the teams.
What Will the Regents Do lNine other first round games will be
Speculations are rife on the campus played. Monday the junior engineers
relative to any possible action that play the soph engineers. Next Tues-
might be taken by the Regents in their day afternoon the senior lits play the
meeting today with the idea of a reviv- junior lits, and soph lits play the fresh
al of intercollegiate schedules to at lits. Wednesday the senior engineers
least some extent forming the gist .of play the junior engineers, and the soph
the question. Action by the navy in engineers play the fresh engineers.
abolishing the Varsity sports is urged Thursday the senior lits play the soph
in support of the maintenance of the lits, and the junior lits play the fresh
present policy as outlined by the Re- lits. Saturday, May 5, the senior eng-
gents in their last session. ineers play the soph engineers, and the
Advocates of a revival cite the ad- junior engineers play the fresh engin-
vices of high army officials to colleges eers.
and universities not to hurry and en- Every team will play at least one
list and to remain in school, imply- game with every other team, before
ing that if the men stay in their pres- the second round which starts in two
ent places little time would be lost weeks.
by the continuance of athletics. Still
another argument advanced is the fact BASTON RECEIVES COMMISSION
that ,several army officials and others AS OFFICER IN MARINE CORPS
have advised pointblank the various
institutions to keep up athletics, dis- Minneapolis, Minn., April 26.- Al-
claiming any great loss of time or dis bert Baston, captain and all-American
advantage accruing from intercolleg- end of the University of Minnesota
iate contests and urging the point of football eleven, has received a commis-
good physical condition produced by sion as an officer in the United States
athletics. marine corps.
It is not known whether any discus- Baston, who is a senior law, was
sion of the movement will take place considered the best end in football,
at the Regents' meeting and any ac- e.-st or west, during the 1915 and 1916
tion is scouted by most of those who seasons.
are cognizant of the situation, how-
ever, in case the Regents should con- BOB SIMPSON TO REPRESENT
sider the matter at all their report MISSOURI IN PENNSY RACE
will be followed with great interest.

t
c
x

SUBJECT SEEMS BOUND TO COME'
UP FOR CONSIDERATION AT '
TODAY'S MEETING
At the meeting of the Regents thisl
morning, the campus is hoping for
definite action upon two topics of ath-l
letic nature. The conference is natur-
ally the paramount athletic issue.,
By an affirmative answer to thel
board in control of athletics' vote of
more than two months back, the Re-
gents will place Michigan in the Big'
Nine and the basketball, baseball, and
track schedules for next year will see
games with Minnesota, Wisconsin, Il-
linois, Chicago, and other schools.E
Next fall's football bill may also in-
clude a struggle with Northwestern,
runner-up in the conference last No-
vember.
By a negative vote, the 1918 winter
and spring contests will be filled by
mach the same games as the present
schedules in all branches of sport con-
tain.
No, definite knowledge as to just
what portion of the campus is in
favor of the return, and what
proportion is against the re-entry
can be known, since no vote on
th' subject has been conducted.
Societies Favor Move
Out of a poll of eight honorary so-
cieties, every one of them reports that
its memberers were almost unani-
mously in favor of it. But one dis-
senting vote was registered. Five of
the eight took action favoring a unani-
mouse return.
House discussion and street talks in
the past two months have proved that
the majority of students are decidedly
in favor of the return. Little talk has
been heard against the resumption of
athletic competition with the western
schools as against the present system
of games.
The Regents are also expected to act
upon this year's interscholastic, dated
for the first Friday and Saturday in
June. That Michigan wished to be
allowed to continue the big prep and
high school meet is conclusively
shown in the sentiment which is in
favor of the resumption of athletic
schedules in general, or at least out-
side competition with M. A. C. and
other schools in the state.
University of Iowa Drops Athletics
Iowa City, Ia., April 26.-The board
in control of athletics at the State
University of Iowa decided that track
athletics will be discontinued at once.
The board acted on the recommenda-
tion of Iowa alumni, Jack Watson, the
track coach, and N. A. Kellogg, man-
ager of athletics.
One exception was made. Those ath-
letes who have been in training this
year and who continue to train will be
sent to the state meet at Des Moines,
May 19, $rovided they show ability.
This dispensation was granted to re-
ward them for their services and to
give them a chance to earn track in-
signias.

TENNIS HATCHES ARRANGED
FOR BENEFIT OF RED CROSS
New York, April 26.-The first of
a series of special tennis matches for
the benefit of the American Red Cross
fund will be played here Saturday
under the auspices of the National
Tennis association. The singles will
bring together Clifton B. Herd of Cali-
fornia, and Harold Throckmorton of
Elizabeth, N. J., while George M.
Church and Dean Mathey will oppose
Karl H. Behr and T. R. Pell.
The matches will be played on the
turf courts of the Westside club at
Forest Hills, L. I. No admission fee
will be charged, but each spectator
will be requested to contribute to the
Red Cross fund. It is planned to play
similar matches each Saturday during
April and May, after which a more
ambitious program may be staged
each week. .
Do your shades need renewing? Call
237. C. H. Major & Co.-Adv.

WEST POINT DROPS ALL
ATHLETICSDURING WAR
SECRETARY OF WAR CANCELS
GAMES OF ALL KINDS, IN-
CLUDING BASEBALL
West Point, April 26.-All athletic
competition between the Military acad-
emy and outside colleges has been
canceled by order of the secretary of
war, it was officially announced. The
cadets had fourteen baseball games
and the entire tennis schedule still
to play.
Nagel is Elected Captain of Yale Team
New Haven, Conn., April 26.-Jo-
seph D. Nagel Jr., of New York City,
has been elected captain of the Yale
track team for next year. Nagel won
his "Y" in the pole vault.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.

Boston, 'April 26.-The Massaeb
etts Yacht Racing union voted to e
cel all races which it had been 1
posed to hold under rules of the un
during the coming summer. No ra
will be scheduled until the war is e
ed. The action of the union, is i
stated, will not interfere with;
racesdscheduled by individual clubs
Les Darcy Will Not Box in Ohi
Columbus, April 26.-Les Darcy
take part in no boxing matches
Ohio, so it was decreed by Gov. Jar
M. Cox. This means Darcy can
box George Chip at Youngstown, I
19, as scheduled.
Senior Lit Baseball Men to Rep
The senior lit baseball team
practice on south Ferry field beg
ning at 3 o'clock this afternoon if
weather permits.

i E ASSACHUSETTS YA
AIRE POSTPONED]I

The Greatest
Values Ever Seen
DRESSES1
a15
Thne'ly and appropriate mod-
cs for street and afternoon
wear. Crepe dle Chines, Silks
and Combinations. Colors be-
ginning with silver and rubber
grays, running through all the
WA putty and sand shades into the
greens and blues. Women's and
misses.
______,JJ"-A
* sr3 rlil~t
n TaoI

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Philadelphia, April 26.-Bob Bimp-
SOCIETY FOR ATHLETES UNDER son of the University of Missouri and
CONSIDERATION AT CORNELL the world's premier hurdler, will com-
pete in the University of Pennsylvania
Ithaca, N. Y., April 26.-An athletic relay carnival which opens tomorrow
Phi Beta Kappa society is being plan- on Franklin field and continues
ned at Cornell as a means of encour- through Saturday.
aging athletics. Membership in the so- Bob was thought out of the games
ciety will be extended to those who are when the University of Missouri ath-
proficient in general athletics, yet in- letic association announced it had not
capable of reaching the high standard sufficient funds to pay his expenses.
of proficiency in any one branch re- The students immediately took up a
quired to warrant placing them on collection and word was flashed today
Varsity teams. that there is more than enough and

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WEATHER DELAYS OPENING
OF CLASS TENNIS TOURNEY
Bad weather and impatience on the
part of players have delayed the inter-
class tennis tournament. Not even
the preliminaries have been arrang-
ed to pick the fdifferent class teams.
If the players will keep off the courts
when they are soft, the chances are
good that regular play can be start-
ed in a week or so.
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Paekard Academy. tl

that Bob is en route.
Simpson will be one of the most
conspicuous of the many stars who
will compete for honors. Despite the
war and the large number of athletic
lights that have been drawn away by
it the carnival will eclipse any other
of its kind in Red and Blue history.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.

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