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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 06, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T

MICHIGAN DA

, ,

April 8th71

Laster

Prepare

Now

Make your selection from our vast assortment of distinctive
weaves and colorful blends.

G.H.
eading Merchant Tailors

Wild Company
STATE STREET

-- - I -- mmmm"NOMMMMOM

C[jMg Nfl rian nal
Official newspaper at the University of
Mi,.gan. Pu'lished every morning except
M nday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
I bei': Ann Arbor Press BuIlding. Sub
scriptions: lby carrier, $2.50; by mail, $3.oo
Want ad. stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or .notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in *the notice box in the west
corridor of the gelefl library, where the
notices are collecidi at 7:~30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Park, r ...,...... Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh ...... Business Manager
Conrad N. Churc..............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn.................City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgtoald.........Sports lfditor
Harold C. L. Jackson...... Telegraph E ditor
Marian Wilson... ..........Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reah.. ......Statistical Edtwr
LE Cam pbell... Assistant Business Manager
Philip Emery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horne. Assistant- Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau...Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter. ..Assistant Business Manager

Students interested
in Spring or Summer
Vacation Work may
file their applications
with the "Y" Employ-
ment secretary now.
Office open from
3 to 6 p. m. daily.

'

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Will find the proper equipment-
- _.
at
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UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES
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Choice Selection of Place Cards
aud Dance Programs
phne 3033Book Sho
home43 338 S. State St.

STOP AT
UTTL E'S
338 S.STATE
sodas and lunches

Special Sale of Cosmetics and Switches
Special Ten Day Weave
BEAUTY SHOP
Miss Mabel Rowe
Shampooing, Manicuring, Massaging and Chiropody
Phone 2402 503 First National Bank Bldg.

i

Night Editors

)RGF BI' CIHOFF IFIRST NATL. BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICHl

J. L. Stadeker
C. M. Jickling
B. A. Swaney

E. L. Zeigler
H. M. Carey
L. W. Nieter

Ce u1- Flowers and Plats
Gh °pin St An Arbr, Mica,
PtION - 8U9 Mi.

Capital $Ioo.ooo Surplus and Profit $65,ooo
DIRECTORS

Wirt Cormnwell
Geo. W. Patterson
S. W. Clarkson
Fred Schmid
T, D. Kinn

Waldo M. Abbott
Harry M. Hawley
Harrison Soule
D. B. Sutton
de

l
t
i
i
1

LS. . hompson.
Reporters
11. C. Garrison Tames Schermerhorn
C. S. Clark 1). S. Rood
R. 1. Fricken G. O. Brophy
B. I. Millar F. A. Taber
1). 13. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmneyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. WNNOod T. C. M artin
1. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
C. C. Andrews R. F. MeDoivihi

®

TRY OUR

7i

Fruit Rolls
Butter Crecams

Mexican Fudge
Bitter Sweets

ese only a few of the Candy Speciaities we
a.:,ofvig STRIC]'IY FRESH AND PURL,.
The ountain of Youth
-tite Street Cor. Liberty

We Offer You a
CUR ITY - --SERVCE - - LOCATION

Reson:TCs $3,800,ooo

Ar Arbor Saings Bank
Incorporated I 869
Main Office.--
Northwest Corner Mai and Huron
Bratch Office-
707 North University Ave..
* Farmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the etiin Modern -]ankng
SECURI TY - - C EF~t CENCY
venie it a1e s- t On te: You Will
'teas wl;th Our ,erice. Tw'o offices
-105 S. an I. 330 S. State St.
it a typewriter from
32a South State street
will furnish you an irbstruction
k free o 'hargo v You will be a
1st before "ou kn ow it
HE SUGAR BOWL
109 S. Main :t.

l)ETR()ITI UNIEI LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:36 a.
m., 8:io a. rn. and hourly to 7:10 p. M., 9:10
P. n.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars--8:4 a. o. ani
every two hours to 6:48 p. M.; to Lansing,
8:48 p. in.
Jackson Express Cars-(Local st ps west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and ever, two hours
o 7:48 p M.
Local Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. in., 6:40 a
M., 7:05 a. in. and every two hours to 7:05 P
an., 8:o p. n., 9:05 p. in., 10:50 p. In. t-
Ypsilanti only, 9:20 a. M., 9:50 a. in., 2:05 p
-t., 6:o p. m., 11:45 f). in, io a..in., i 2:
a. in. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6;os a. in., 7:5o a
'T., 10:20 p. 11.. 12:20 a. in.
Iakes Pictures
Develops Films
makes Prints
and Enlarge-
W, V1 ments.
7 . UNIVERSITY
ihe University of Chicago
M -in addition to resident
work.offers also instruc-
STUDY Lon by correspondence.
For detailed in.
formation address
24th Year U. of C.(Div. H), Chicago, I. I LI
KOLLAUF, The Tailor

C. L. (-JdMstein
Busines% Staff
Paul E. CholettesHarry R. Louis
Harold "akinson arl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
B.eroard -Johl
TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 19.17.
Night Editor---J. Schermerhorn, Jr.
SHOWING SIGNS OF LIFE
This is a happy year at Michigan.
particularly in one respect. Things
are moving. Organizations which hav(
been asleep or apparently dead have
awakened to activity. The Mimes of
the Michigan Union roused from its
lethargic state seems to be having
something to say In the management
of the 1917 Union opera.
The latest organization to emerge
Phoenix-like from the ashes of inac-
tivity is the Michigan Boat club.
Though the Huron promises little in
the way of aquatic activity for more
than a month, the officers of the Boat
club have met to re-organize, and offer
the campus something tangible in the
nature of an organization for the en-
couragement of water sports.
We hore that the plans of re-cr-
ganization prove effective for we be-
lieve that there is a great deal of in-
terest in canoeing and river sports at
Michigan. Thli campus will welcome
a strong club organized in the in-
terests of aquatic sports.
From all accounts the Illini were
gracious hosts last Saturday.
We now have an "inn"'bor bird so-
ciety. Someone has suggested that
a squirrel club be organized.
Billy Sunday has just refused a
$2,000 a day job with a circus. Can
it be that the famous devil fighter is
losing his pep?

It might possibly be that The Michi-
gan Daily is simply a Maynard street
corporation which has no special sym-
pathy or regard for the will of the stu-
dent body which supports it. In this
case my assumption, that The Michi-
gan Daily has a peculiar right to my
sympathy and support, is wrong.
I spoke above of the normal man and
is prejudices. If you, Mr. managing
editor, have any special desire to favor
the British people, as it would seem
from the columns of The Daily, I, for
one, do not. If I could not avoid
imposing my fond fancies on you, or
noon the student body, were I ian-
aging editor of The Micihgan Daily,
I should acknowledge my incom-
petency for the position and resign.
Witness the article in columns two
and three, page four of the issue of
The Daily for March 3, 1917. It is not
opnly poor selection of available news
because of its impertinence -to Michi-
gan students and its pitiful literary
rank, but it is, obviously, silly bias.
And, now, I wish this point to stand
out from the rest of my argument.
You, as managing editor of The Mich-
igan Daily, in spite of the fact that
the student body of the University of
Michigan has explicitly, by referen-
dum, repudiated compulsory military
training, and thereby disfavoring mili-
tary training in general, persist in
your policy of ignoring and overrid-
ing the will of the student body, as
thus expressed. It is high time that
your position be defined. Mr. man-
aging editor, what is your answer to
these questions?
SAMUEL GREENSPAWN, '17M.
Editor's Note-On Nov. 8, 1915, the

r

i
1s

O R
F LANDWER S
FLOWERS
PHONE 294 213 E. Liberty St.

1

® an t D 7 A book. Same way with
V E YI -'- n theI
wvo c ;o . ef ore
it a: '1Eie iOt..

Member of Florists' Telegraph
Delivery Service
Flowers by Wire to All the World.

tN
--
PERFECT gentleman ain't pro-
du 6: 2 d by a night's study over

I

.®.. .

Leave your DULL Safety Razor
Blades to be SHARPENED with
Wiliam W. Behringer
Il NICKIELS ARCADE

.e,.,
--..

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...

...

University Senate voted to transmit
to the Regents a plan for establishing
compulsory military training at Michi-
gan beginning with the academic year
1910-1917. On Nov. 30, 1915, a student
referendum on the question of com-
pulsory training was held. In this ref-
erendum, 1,040 voted in favor of es-
tablishing compulsory training, and
932 voted against it. The Regents re-
cently provided for the adoption of a
system of voluntary training as pro-
vided for in war orders number 48.
The Daily has urged students to en-
roll in the courses in military science,
provided for by the action of the Reg-
ents, and in the military drill which
will supplement the theoretical
courses.

n
0
(

COME AND SEE THE
BLACKMER POSITIVE ROTARY PUMP EXHIBIT
AT 22t EAST LIBERTY STREET, NEAR FIFTH AVENUE
Ihis improved Blackni r lPositive l Rotary Pum1) will be Manufactured in Ann
Arbor. where a largze plant will soon be Nilt. We now have nearly zoo Subscribers
to our stock, a considerable portion of which has been subscribed and the remainder
is now being subs"ribed very fast. If vo wish to see a real pump in operation or
care for a very prohtable investment, come and see us.
SPRAGUE-BLACKMER ENGINEERING CO.
Open frem g A. M. to 8:30 P. M.

ttional bankruptcy into national fi-
tncial stability, they freed millions
f Egyptians from slavery and serf-
>m, and gave the opportunities of

SPECIAL SUNDAES
LI+:_ LUNC hES
Our candies are mde in
our own sanitary shop.

Clothes designed and made
on premises-fit guaranteed

I(/-al.J alan td Ann Sts.

Ann Arbor

?YTS THRIG a!TAYBRS C'
Dean Myra B.J edn~ will be at
xne to Uuivers1 ~a - f n:a I to 6
clock this afternco
Y. \\. C. A tabite mbel s fronm 4
5 o'clock this aisormmoon in New-
mrry hall.
Girls' Glee club I ut wi i behl
4:30 o'clock P:! ; feen i Sarahi
tswehl A ell ball. Reguer prac-
se will be at 5 o'clock. All money
.d tickets fro the Ar ade must be
rmed in at this lime.
F'uller sisters vet ilal uder the an-
ices of the Women's league and the
id Cross will be at S e'clock tonight
Sarah Caswell Anehl hall.
Songs for the ci est opened by the
>uen's athietic depar-tmeat shouhd
in the bands of some mQem1' cc the
partment by Wednestday afternoon.
can duplicate any lens. J. L.
apman, Optrometrist and Jeweler. tf
For live, progressive, np-to-date ad
'tising use The Michigan Daily.

Hospital Notes
Arnold Ensel, '20, 644 East Univer-
sity :stree-t, is quarantined in his room
with Grman measles.
George M. Lewn, '19E, was severely
Lurned with sulphuric acid in the
chemical laboratory yesterday after-
noon ob his -i h arm and face.
J. W. Beckman, '20, 213 North Thay-
er street, was treated at the University
hliraltih service yesterday afternoon for
Isdlpburic acid burns on his face which
l. received in the chemical laboratory.
V\. P. Harris, '19, is quarantined at
620 Monroe street with the German
measles. .
The scarlet fever patients are: the
4 year old daughter of Prof. W. C.
load, 328 Est Huron street, and Miss
Helen Blain, 21 years old, 332 East
Jefferson street. Both cases are mild.

A dollar-a-month club has been
formed to aid starving Belgians. Now
a philanthropic student steps forward
and suggests a cigarette-a-day club
for students who have sworn off buy-
ing but who are glad to accept any
cigarette offered.
CRITICIZES DAILY POLICY
SAYS PAPER OPPOSES WILL OF
STUDENTS IN ADVOCATING MILI.
TARY TRAINING

HINDUS AE RESPONSIBLE

-I

ORIENTAL DECLARES BRITISH
NOT TO BLAME FOR CONDITIONS
IN INDIA

I

Editor, The Michigan Daily:

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
I wish to draw the attention of the
students of the University to the edi-
torial policy of The Michigan Daily.
And while doing so, I wish to ask
you, Mr. managing editor, some ques-
tions.,
Granted that every normal man has
his prejudices, do you believe that he
has a right to impose them upon
others? Do you think that as manag-
ing editor of The Michigan Daily you
have the right to override the will of
the student body of the University at
large? Do you think that the dig-
nities, the sentiments, the purposes of
the student body should be tacitly
scorned in the columns of The Daily?
Do you think that repressing news un-
favorable to your prejudices, and
printing, in the main, only such news
stories as will strengthen your point
is fair dealing? Even if you think so,
what will the student body have to1
say? Or does the student body have

In view of the fact that there has
lately been appearing in your paper
a series of articles purporting to fur-
nish the student body and other read-
ers information on India, but which
in fact are unfounded charges against
the British empire, prompted by per-
sonal bias and malice, the writer, a
British. subject-not of English ex-
traction, but a native of the island of
Cyprus--takes this opportunity to file
a protest against the continuation of
these articles.

I

an education to their children for the
first time; they liberated the people of
Cyprus from the tyranny of the Turk
and gave them a chance to work out
their own salvation, with assurances
that their lives and property would
be respected and protected, a thing
unknown in Cyprus for centuries prior
to the advent of British rule; and, as
Mrs. Barbour so excellently stated, the
English brought the Hindus out of
barbarism and oppression into the
light of civilization and personal lib-
erty.
There can be no doubt that famines
similar to the ones complained of, ex-
isted in India prior to the advent of
British rule. The British having
brought the Hindus into contact with
civilization and having opened up the
country to international trade, the in-
herently lazy Hindus found it more
difficult to get along.
Mr. Hardikar in his naive and
puerile attempts to heap opprobrium
upon the British people, furnishes us
with quotations that constitute his
own refutation. To quote him: "Fam-,
ines in India are not due to the lack
of food supply. Enough food has al-
ways been grown in India to feed the
population. But the people are so re-
sourceless, so absolutely unrepared
(we might add, unprepared be 'use of
their inherent laziness and shiftless-
ness), that when crops do fail, they
are unable to buy from any neighbor-
ing province which may have a rich
harvest. It is the poverty of the peo-
ple that brings on the famines." Nay,
it is the laziness of the people, and
their preference for alms rather than
work that are the causes for these
famines.
The writer of this letter being him-
self an Oriental, knows the spirit of
laziness pervading all Oriental peo-

ple. The typical Oriental is not prone
to work unless he is prodded on by
famine; and if he can beg alms, why,
so much the better. This is the rea-
son why the farther east a tourist
goes, the more beggars he encounters;
and vwhen he reaches India he finds
a great many more there than in any
other Oriental country. The Oriental's
fatalistic doctrines and superstitions
-the anticipation of having 72,000
women and 70,000 servants apiece,
and the enjoyment of delectable mor-
sels of food and other sensuous pleas-
ures immediately upon his demise,
make his desire of work still less and
increase his chances of death by fam-
ine still more. These and not British
rule are the causes of the periodic
famines in India complained of.
BARKER D. BAIRAM, '1$L.
GIVE NEW COURSES IN WOOl)
PRESERVATION IN FORESTRY
Several new courses in wood preser-
vation and impregnation, not given as
riegular courses in any other univer-
sity, are now included in the regular
outlined courses in the forestry de-
partment of the University.
C. M. Sporely, '17, who is special-
izing in this work, recently attended
the 13th annual convention of the Am-
erican Wood Preservers association.
The purpose of this organization is to
develop and encourage wood preserva-
tion throughout the country.
Fair Sized Audience Greets Mrs. Mead
A medium. sized audience greeted
Mrs. Lucia Ames Mead who spoke on
"The World's Crisis and America's
Duty," at the Methodist church Sunday
evening. Mrs. Mead spent part of yes-
terday investigating the libraries of
the city, finding out what literature is
in these°libraries dealing with the pro-
blems of the day.
For results advertise in The Michi-
gan Daily.'

If British rule in England's colonies
and dependencies were oppressive,
tyrannical, and generally detrimental
to the welfare of the governed, the
writer of this letter as a native of the
island of Cyprus would be among the
first to take up arms against the op-
pressers, with a view to throwing off
the foreign yoke. But as a matter of
fact there is practically nothing to
complain of British rule; hence the
general contentment of the people so

l

m)ace at Dear Price Only Is Opinion
Champaign, Ill., March 5.-"Peace
at a very dear price, but not peace at
any price," was the opinion of nine-
tenths of the 1,000 people interviewed
in Champaign on the question of an
immediate declaration of war against
Germany.
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

governed.

I

It has never been the policy of the
English to exploit the people whom
they governed. On the contrary they
have done the best they could to
ameliorate 'the condition of the poor
and lower classes wherever they have
gone. They brought Egypt out of

anything to say concerning the paper
which it has to read every morning?

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