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March 06, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-06

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THE WEATHER

1Al

VOUPIOL Ar

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

I

PRAB A'lTY NfWt)W

v WARMER

v;

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, T I)A , LARCh 6, 1917.

VOL.XXVIL No. 107.

x

COUNCILMEN ROM
CONFERENCE FAV OR
MICHIGA'S RETURN
IL F. DUNNE, '17L, AND H. A.
TAYLOR, '17E, REPRESENT
UNIVERSITY
CONVENTION HELD AT
PURDUE UNIVERSITY
Honor Systems, Class Rushes, and
Campus Elections Also
Discussed
Meeting with 20 other delegates from
15 western schools, including all of
the members of the Big Nine, M. F.
Dunne, '17L, and H. A. Taylor, '17E,
represented Michigan at a conference
of student councilmen held at Purdue
university, March 1, 2, and 3. Ques-
tions pertaining to student government
and student unions were discussed by
the delegates.
The opinions of the representatives
from Michigan concerning the pro-
posed return to the conference and the
result of the honor system as tried
'here recently were presented. All of
the students from the Big Nine schools
expressed themselves as being strong-
ly in favor of Michigan's return and
stated that their, own sentiments were
those of the great majority of their
fellow students.
Four hundred students of Purdue
university attended the open meeting
Thursday night which was the first
session of the conference. Following
the address of welcome by President
Stone of Purdue, M. F. Dunne, '17L,
gave a talk on Michigan and the Big
Nine. He pointed out that the Wol-
verines were anxious to return. In
the discussions which followed the
delegates expressed themselves to be
greatly in favor of seeing Michigan
back in the fold once more.
Taylor Discusses Honor System
Several questions concerning stu-
dent government were discussed' at
the next meeting of the conference
Friday afternoon. H. A. Taylor, '17E,
spoke on the honor system at Michi-
gan, showing how it had worked in
the engineering and medical colleges.
Taylor also talked on the Union point-
ing out the way in which the students
and~ alumni had been successfully
campaigned to raise the funds for the
million dollar building now under con-
atruction. In the discussion follow-
ing Taylor's talk it was shown that
the honor system was working suc-
cessfully in six of the colleges repre-
sented and was being agitated in most
of the remaining.
Some of the topics which were also
considered Friday afternoon dealt with
athletic celebrations, co-operative
bookstores, underclass rushes, and
methods of choosing cheer leaders. All
rushes have been abolished at Purdue,
Minnesota, and Chicago because of
serious accidents which have resulted
from them.
On Friday night the delegates were
the guests at a dance given by the
Purdue Union. This dance was called
the Blanket Hop, as the proceeds were
to be used to buy blankets for mem-
bers of the varsity teams.
Consider Campus Elections
At the last meeting of the conference
held Saturday morning campus elec-
tions and politics were discussed.
Most of the delegates were opposed
to all "peanut politics," but it was

found that some of the schools al-
lowed them because they kept the
campus interested in the election.
Most of the western colleges differ
from Michigan in that they have only
four class presidents in the entire col-
lege in place of one for each depart-
ment.
Before the conference ended the
representatives organized themselves
into a permanent federation of student
councils of western colleges. Five
men were chosen as an executive
council and are as follows: A. E.
Bryson, Nebraska; I. R. Raeder, Ames;
R. R. Jamison, Purdue, and the other
two are the president and secretary of
the student council of the University
of Illinois which will entertain the
conference next year. This executive
council is to draw up rules for the
organization.
During the conference the delegates
were the guests of the various fra-
+.rnmtesat. Purdue.

Thre Tong Wars
Break on Coast

BOAT CLUB SEE

KS TO WHOLESLLE BOMB PLOT
INTEREST REVEALED INHOOE

t ____ .._.

Outbreaks Occur Simultaneously
San Francisco, Oakland, and
Stockton

in

San Francisco, March 5. - Four
Chinese were slan and five persons
were shot, two fatally, at 1:30 o'clock
this afternoon when the most formid-.
able tong war the Pacific coast has
witnessed in several years broke out
simultaneously in San Francisco, Oak-
land, and Stockton.
Two Chinese were killed, one was
fatally wounded, and a bystander was
shot in the leg in San Francisco. One
Chinese is dead,one is dying, and two
bystanders were wounded in Stockton,'
and one Chinese is dead in Oakland.'
In all the outbreaks the participants
were members of,the Bing Kong and
Suey Sing tongs. The slain Chinese
and those fatally wounded were all
members of one of these tongs, but
all the persons less seriously wounded
were white or orientals innocently
caught in the fusillade of bullets that
followed the outbreak.
The fact that all of the outbreaks
occurred at almost exactly the same
hour caused the police to believe that
they were carefully planned by the
leaders of the tongs. It is feared that
the demonstration this afternoon will
nrove to be merely the forerunner of
other outbreaks in the Pacific coast
cities. Arrests have been made in all
'he affected cities.
FULLER SISTERS IN
FOLK-SONG RECITAL
Part of Proceeds of Concert Go to
Red Cross Associa-
tion
Wearing early Victorian costume,
Cynthia and Dorothy Rosalind Fuller
will give a recital of folk-songs of
'ngjand, Scotland, and Ireland at 8
o'clock tonight in Sarah Caswell An-
-ell hall. The songs will be sung to
harp accompaniment.
A part of the proceeds of the con-
cert, which is under the auspices of
.he Women's league, will go to the
Red Cross association. The evening
program will be as follows:
Prologue:
"Song of the Play-Actors".......
...................Nottinghamshire
Cradle Song:
"Sleep My Baby"............Ireland
Children's Songs:
"Here Comes a Duke a-Riding"....
...................... Hampshire
"When I Was a Young Girl"..Dorset
Love Songs:
"o Waly, Waly"..............Ireland
"Leezie Lindsay" ............ Scotland
"My Man John"..........Somerset
Songs of Marriage:
"Clerk Tammas and Fair Annie"...
.Scotland
"The Twa Sisters o' Binnorie"....
...........................Scotland
Intermission
Songs of Occupation:
"The Sheep-shearing Song".. Somerset
"Dashing Away with the Smoothing
Iron" ..................Hampshire
"Would You Know How Doth the
Peasant" ...............Lancashire
Song of Burial:
"The Lyke Wake Dirge"...........
...................Northumberland
Songs of Home and Country:
"The Lark in the Morn" ....Somerset
"In Praise of Islay".,.......Scotland
Epilogue:
"Brischam Town".......Devonshire
SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES OF
* STUDENT COUNCIL CONTINUED
Owing to the success of the com-
bined Student council dance held last
Saturday, further plans have been
made by the two organiztions for an-
other dance to be held from 8:30 to
11:30 o'clock this coming Saturday in

Barbour gymnasium. Tickets will be
on sale from 12:45 to 2 o'clock Thurs-
day in U versity hall. Admission will
be 50 cents.
Make Arrangements for Convention
Minneapolis, March 6.- Arrange-
ments are being made for the annual
convention of the Mid-western Inter-
collegiate Self-government association,
which will be held here May 3, 4, and
5. The colleges that will be repre-
sented are: Cornell, Northwestern,
Michigan, Wisconsin, Grinnell, Ne-
braska, De Pauw, Ohio, Washington,
Missouri, India, Illi'nois, Kansas, and
Minnesota.

NEW OFFICERS FROM JUNIORS,I
SOPhOMORES, AND FRESH.-
MEN TO BE CHOSEN
"Bigger, better, and livlier boating
interests for the University," is thel
slogan of the present officers of thec
Michigan Boat club in their campaignI
for new 'and active material for the
club.1
Four years ago, when the club was#
affiliated with the Union, members
with executive ability were secured+
as officers by arousing a wide interest
among the student body, and selecting
men who had the greatest experience
in aquatic sports. The same plan will
be used now.t
All juniors, sophomores, and fresh-
men interested in boating, and willing
to serve as officers in the club, who
have had some experience in canoeing,
yachting, regettas, or water sports,
are asked to communicate with Rob-
ert Collins, '17E, 910 Cornwell place,'
this week, stating their qualifications.
Men with organizing ability are espe-
cially wanted.
The officers .of the Michigan Boat'
club are: Commodore, vice-commo-
dore, secretary, treasurer, and first,
second, and third ensigns. Juniors1
will be chosen as officers, with a com-
mittee of underclassmen under each
officer.
PAUL WARRINER DIES'
Saginaw Boy Succumbs Within Week
to Inflammatory Rheumatism
Paul W. Warriner, '20E, died at 1:15
o'clock yesterday afternoon at the Ann
Arbor private hospital with inflam-
matory rheumatism. Mrs. E. C. War-
riner was at the bedside when her
son passed away. Mr. Warriner was
notified and arrived late last night.
The deceased was taken sick last
Tuesday morning and was removed to
the University hospital Saturday aft-
ernoon. The patient's condition sud-
denly became worse Sunday afternoon
and he was sent to Dr. Reuben Pet-
erson's private hospital.
Paul Warriner was 19 years of age,
born in Saginaw and a graduate of
Saginaw Eastern high school. He is
mourned by his father, Mr. E. C. War-
riner, superintendent of the Saginaw
public schools, and mother, and a
younger sister and brother. No ar-
rangements have yet been made for
the funeral.
CORNELL PROFE,SORS DECLARE
h. S. HSTREATED BY GERMANY
Ithaca, N. Y., March 5.-That the
United States has been mistreated by
Germany and that Germany is unjusti-
fied in its present method of subma-
rine warfare, is the prevailing senti-
ment among professors of Cornell uni-
versity.
The Cornell Daily Sun requested the
individual members of the faculty to
voice their sentiments through its col-
ums and many have responded to the
request. The consensus of opinion
seems to favor a declaration of war
by the United States upon Germany.

POLICE FIND ENOUGH EXPLOS-
IVES TO WRECK ENTIRE
CITY
Hoboken, March 5.-A wholesale
bomb plot, including a possible plan
of attack on President Wilson was be-
lieved to have been revealed here this
afternoon in the arrest of Richard
Kolb in a local hotel room in which
were found several bombs and quan-
tities of explosives.
A second arrest was made later in
the day but the police withheld details.
Tn Kolb's room the police said enough
explosives were found to have de-
stroyed the entire city. The arrest
was made by police and members of
the neutral squad who took Kolb to
detective headquarters immediately to
be questioned. At police headquarters
it was said Kolb had confessed. He
and his accomplice, who is now being
sought, intended going to Washington
as soon as possible to "get" President
Wilson.
It is understood the arrest followed
investigation into the Black Tom and
other New Jersey explosions. The
Commercial hotel where Kolb was ar-
rested was the base of operation of
Lieutenant Fay, who confessed to
plots against ships sailing from Amer-
ican harbors. The hotel is directly
opposite the German Lloyd steam-
ship piers.
TRIANGLES INITIATE
Three Junior Engineers Taken in to
Honorary Society
Third election from the junior en-
gineer class for Triangles was held
yesterday afternoon. After cleaning
the triangles in the arch of the engi-
neering building with frozen water,
and Dutch cleanser, the following men
were duly initiated into the junior
honorary society: H. W. Collins, W. J.
Piggott, and H. B. Haskins.
BROWN TO DECIDE ON BIGGER
MILITARY TRAINING SYSTEM
Providence, R. I., March 5.-Brown
university is holding an election to de-
cide unon the advisability of adopting
a more widespread system of military
training.,
Two questions will be asked upon
the ballots: (1) Will you devote not
more than six hours a week to some
form of military training in a Brown
corps?
(2) Do you favor national universal
military training?
Students who vote in the affirmative
on the first question will be enrolled
in a corps now being planned.
Post Security League Members Names
Members of the Ann Arbor division
of the National Security league will
find a complete list of both life and
yearly members posted on the bulletin
board on the second floor opposite the
east entrance of the new science build-
ing.
Every member may verify his name
and address as it appears on the list.
If any corrections are to be made,
they should be reported to Prof. W.
H. Hobbs in room 223 natural science
building.

DEMOCRATS TRY
TO LIMIT DEBATE
Washington, March 5.-Demo-
cratic senators in caucus at
10:30 o'clock tomorrow morning
will consider ways and means
of amending the ancient rules
so as to limit debate. This step
is taken upon demand of Presi-
dent Wilson, who pointed out
that such an agreement would
have made it possible to pass
the armed neutrality bill.
An effort to limit debate will
meet with stubborn resistance
by many senators, having ex-
pressed themselves as inalter-
ably opposed to anything that
would interfere with their con-
stitutional rights to discuss a
bill or measure fully.
The plan being considered
provides that 16 senators may
at any time, by signing a peti-
tion, have a vote taken on the
following day to close debate.
An affirmative vote of two-thirds
would then result in each sen-
ator being limited to one hour's
debate on a measure or an
amendment.
BAND BOUNCE PICTURES
SCENE OF PACIFIC ISLE

THOUSANDSMAC
IND CHEER WILSON
AT INAUGURATIO*N
LEADS PROCESSION IN CARRIAGE;
SPIRIT OF PARTSANSHP
NOT EVIDENT
URGES AMERICANISM
STEEPED IN SPIRIT

ALLURING, ENTRANCING
LOVELY ARE SCENES IN
EVENT

ANDI

Wailani! Wailani!I
From the soughing sea along the
beach at Waikiki, from the languid
land of lulling music, comes the plain-
tive melody of the Pacific isles,
strummed by the Wailani string quar-t
tet, to be heard at the annual Band
Bounce next Friday evening in Hillc
auditorium. The quartet is composed1
of ukeleles, banjos, and mandolins,
and play the ancient and modern
Hawaiian songs, as well .as several
original elections.
The amorous languor of the gayT
Parisienne Montmarte is depicted in
the ancient love theme of the Pierrot
and Columbine dance to be presented;
by Helen McAndrew, '19, and Genev-
ieve O'Leary, '17.-
What promises to be the big novelty
act is an original vaudeville skit of
dialogue and songs, presented by Louis
Emerman, '18L, and Seymour Simons,
'17E. The entire act is written by the
two men, and Simons presides over
the piano, while Emerman does the
cantalations.;
"High, Low, Jack, and the Game"
is the title of an act featuring a series
of gymnastic feats presented by three
of Dr. May's most promising proteges.
James H. Stephens, the campus man-
dolin wonder, will appear fi a special
mandolin harmony act, and a galaxy
of college dramatic talent, including
Morrison Wood, '17, Eva Bowen, '18,
end several others will present skits
in song, dance, and monologue.,
Those in charge of the affair this
year are: General chairman, Ezra W.
Lockwood, '18; stage manager, David
W. Shand, '18; chairman of ticket
sales, James Schermerhorn Jr., '18;
program advertising manager, Harry
Lewis, '19; advertising counsellor,
Kirk White, '17; property manager,
Robert L. Storrer, '19E; publicity man-
ager, Thomas F. McAllister, '18. Tick-
ets may be had from Grinnell's music
house, Wahr's, Slater's, and Huston's.
FIRST AID CLASSES
WILL START TODAY

Ieceiving Stand of Inaugural Party
Enclosed in Glass; Seat Specs.
ulators Reap I rvest
Washington, March 5.-Pres-
dent Wilson founded a new doe.
trine of internationalism and
world peace In his inaugural ad-
dress today, but in the same
breath warned that the United
States may require a more im-
mediate association with the war
than armed neutrality. He be-
spoke a unity of American
thoughts, spirits, and action, and
voiced a view that this must be
an Americanism steeped in spirit
instead of the isolated national
view of the past.
By J. P. Yoder
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, March 5.-Steeped in
patriotism, "Proud in Mien," cheered
by a surging human swarm along
their way, an enormous marching col-
umn swept majestically down Penn-
sylvania avenue today, a nation's in-
augural tribute to President Wilson,
A canyon of humanity saw them
pass, soldiers and sailors, the splen-
did boys of West Point and Annapolis,
the soldiers of the nation's military
schools, khaki clad lads with uniforms
still stained with Mexican alkali dust,
political clubs, glee clubs, foreign-
born marchers, and great booming
bands.
At their head, surrounded by pranc-
ing horses, rode President Wilson in
an open carriage. Clear and crisp the
March wind blew down the streets. It
only added zest to the march. Above
the clouds had cleared, and a brilliant
sun cheered a crowd that at dawn had
been doleful under threatened rain.
The thousands of marchers trailed the
president.
Spirit of Partisanship Unnoticed
At the court of honor they halted
while the president lunched. Then,
at attention, man after man passed the
president's reviewing stand, saluting
gravely with "eyes left" as they went.
The spirit of partisanship appeared
dead, though one could not miss the
proudly victorious assurance of the
Democratic clubs.
California's 13 electors, the men
who swung the tide for Wilson last
fall, flaunted with obvious pride their
golden state banner flag. Near them
marched a group of the foreign-orn.
It was a sight to thrill. Their slogans
slung aloft read, "We Stand for Amer-
ica." At their head the future mili-
tary leaders from West Point and An-
napolis marched with the precision of
machines. As they passed the stand
the president saluted. Both the presi-
dent and Mrs. Wilson stood, as did
Vice-President and Mrs. Marshall and
the president's aids.
Inargural Party Enclosed In Glass
The little glass-enclosed reviewing
stand with its coatless occupants dif-
fered from the adjoining boxes. There
was a rug on the floor of the presi-
dent's stand, and it was nice and
warm. Outside it was much different.
Members of the president's cabinet and
their wives sat huddled in a bo to
the left of the reviewing platform.
Speculators Make Money on Seat Sale
Washington, March 5.-Speculators
who gambled on fair weather for the
inaugural parade today reaped a rich
harvest on the last minute rush for
seats as the parade developed. Prices
ranged all the way from $3.00 for a
bleacher seat to $10 and $15 for seats
in stands under cover. Many per-
sons had put off buying seats until the
eleventh hour, made doubtful about
fair weather by the forecast.

Prof. Cross Speaks at Menorah Meeting
Prof. H. M. Cross of the fine arts
department presented an illustrated
lecture on the subject "Artists and Art
in the Old Testament," at the 1enorah
society meeting in Alumni Memorial
hall Sunday.

A Rhyming Reporter Turns This in
Driven Insane by Phone B ell 's Din

Shrill the piercing whistle rent the
stillness of the night. Ann Arbor's
peaceful populace trembled with
afright. 'Twas only yester even' when
echoed loud the blast, and all The
Daily's telephones were ringing long
and fast.
"Oh tell me why the clarion
sounds!" and "Whence is that alarm?"
"I hope the German U-boats havel

done no further harm!" "I've called
the fire department and I've ques-
tioned the police, but until I learn
the wherefore I can not rest in peace."
And the men upon The Daily, they
scampered o'er the town, with the
journalist's celerity that's won itself
renown. Sh-h-h! 'twas a broken
whistle valve that screamed for near
an hour, on an A. A. locomotive in its
little roundhouse bower.

Seven Groups of 15 Students
Study Under Universily
iPhysicIIhs

Eacb

Fuller Sisters Concert

Dr. H. H. Cummings will meet he
first class in first aid for University
men at 7 o'clock tonight in the health
service.
There are 15 students in each o" the
seven classes organized, which v ill
meet on Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday evenings in rooms to be an-
nounced later. The classes will be in
charge of Dr. H. H. M. MalIejan, J. V,
.Sherrick, R. W. Kraft, Q. O. Gilbert,
W. H. Gordon, and H H. Cummings.
The course includes bandaging,
treatment of fractures, control of
bleeding, measures for common emer-
gencies, treatment of poisons and first
aid measures in military work.

TUESDAY. MARCH 6

8:00 P. M.

Sarah Caswell Angell Hall
Admission 35c
UNDER AUSPICES OF WOMEN'S LEAGUE AND
RED CROSS SOCIETY

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