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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 17, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UNCING OU,

EXHIBIT

Spring and Summer Sultings
nerican and Foreign Sources in Artistic and Striking Designs
YOUR INSPECTION INVITED
G. H. Wild Company,
Merchant Tailors STATE STREET
University
TEXT BOOKS
New aind Secondheand
SeSlater Book Shop

STOP AT
UTTLE'S
338 S. STATE
sodas and lunches
)RGE BISCHOFF
LORIST
Cut Flowers and Plants
pin St. Ann Arbor, Mich.
PHONE 809 M

Rowe City Laundry
406 Detroit St
Cash cards save you money
PHONE 457-M
FIRST NATL. BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $ioo,ooo Surplus and Profit $6S,ooo
DIRECTOR'S
Wirt Cornwell Waldo M. Abbott
Geo. W. Patterson Harry M. Hawley
S. W. Clarkson Harrison Soule
Fred Schmid D. B. Sutton
E. D. Kinnie

Carry a Large Assortment of Candies

We can Satisfy Your Taste
A TRIAL WILL CONVINCE YOU

The Fountain of Youth
State Street Cor. Liberty

We Offer You
ITY - - SERVICE - LOCATION
esoutrces $3,800,000
Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
)ff ice--
iwest Corner Main and Huron
IOffice--
07 North University Ave.
nmers & MeCbnics Bank
s the Best in Modern Banking
IRITY - - - EFFICIENCY
and Pleasant quarters. You Will
With Our Service. Two Offices
Main St. : 330 S. State St.
SUGAR BOWL
109 s. Main St.

PECIAL SUNDAES
LIGHT LUNCHES
ur candies are made in
yr own sanitary shop.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
etween Dietroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
ar ne ao ngastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
in., 8:o a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. m., 9:10
p. M.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. in and
every'two hours to 6:48 p. In.; to Lansing,
3:41 p . ,
Jackson Express3 Cars -( Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9 :48 A. m and every two hours
to 7:48 P. m.
Local Cars Eastbound-s6:35 a. m., 6:40 a.
mn., 7:05 a. mn. and every two hours to 7:03 p.
W- ? :sgp. in., 9:05 p. in., 10:go p. iM. to
psi anti only, 9:20 a. in.,9 :so a. mn., s :oj p
Mn., 6:05gp.fmi, X1:45 P. im., 1:10 a. im., 1:24
a. Mn To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6 :o5 a. in., r:5o a.
M., 9e:a 0. m.. 12:20 a. M.
/ Takes" Pictures.
1 1Develops Films
Swainmakes Prints
and Enlarge-
Zia E. VNIVERS1TY
The University of Chicag o
HO in addition to resident
MEwork, offers also instruc-
tion by correspondence.
STU y For detailed in.
L Nth Year U. of C. (Div. H), Cicao, . wa.r..
DR. N. S. HARDIKAR TO WRITE
ARTICLES ON HINDU HISTORY
In tomorrow's issue of The Michi-
gan Daily will appear the first article
of a series of 11, by Dr. N. S. Hardikar,
grad., of Hubli, India, dealing with
the country of his birth. The subjects
covered in the series will be: "The
History and Civilization of India,"
"The Caste System," "Woman's Posi-
tion," "Religions," "Indian Education,"
"Loyalty to the Empire," "The Great
War and India," "Sufferings of the
Hindus," Present Problems," and
"The Future." '
India will be the seventh country
to be dealt with in the series of ar-
ticles on foreign countries published
in The Daily and written by members
of the Cosmopolitan club of the Uni-
versity. Thus far the countries cov-
ered are: Japan, Germany, Canada,
China, South Africa, and Porto Rico.
PHI LAMBDA UPSILON HOLDS
BANQUET AT UNION MARCH 1
Phi. Lambda Upsilon, honorary
fraternity, will hold a banquet at the,
Union on the evening of March 1. At
this time a prominent chemist will ad-
dress the organization. The next so-
cial event given by the fraternity will
be ip the form of a dance, which will,
immediately precede the spring vaca-
tion.

Official newsaper at the University of
Mifrgan. Pubshed every morning except
M-miday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $2.5; by mail, $3.00.
Want ad. stations: uarry's; Students' Sup-
I1 Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 96; Editorial, 244.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:o o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker.........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
LeesE Joslya.................. City Editor
HaroldA.itzgerald........sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson............Women's Editor
Carleton 'W. Meads....... Statistical "dtr
, Z Cam p bell.. .Assistant Business Manager
. hilip Emery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert $ or .Assistant Business Manager
Rscoe R. Rau.. -Assitant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter...Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
.E L. Stadeker L. Zeigler
C. M. tickling. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney L. W. Nieter
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumgarth
Reporters
H. C. Garrison C. L. Roeser
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood
R. H. Fricken G. O. Brophy
B. I. Millar F. A. Tfaber
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood J. C. Martin
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
Business Staff
Bernard Woh J. E. Robinson
Paul E..Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1917.
Night Editor-Harry M. Carey
PACIFISM, JINGOISM, AND THE
TRUE SITUATION
Wouldn't it be wonderful if war had
forever been abolished from the earth
-if men loved each other in a uni-
versal brotherhood and hate .was an
unknown passion.
But it so happens that war has not
been abolished. That there is a great
and terrible war going on at present.
That the United States has broken off
diplomatic relations with a great
power, and is liable to enter the war.
We print this morning a communi-
cation, which in a clever, satirical
style ridicules The Daily as pursuing
a jingoistic policy in attempting to
arouse greater interest in the pro
posed courses in military instruction
at Michigan.
We do not believe in peace at any
price, nor do we believe in war at any
cost. But we do believe that the time
has come for the young man of Amer-
ica, particularly college men, to equip
themselves for any emergency that
may arise. We are printing the clever
communication this morning because
we think it is a splendid illustration
of an unfortunate, narrow spirit that
exists to a limited degree in our coun-
try at the present time.
We do not want war. We are not
looking for tinsel bedecked musical
comedy heroes, but as President
Hutchins said to students at the time
of the Spanish-American war: "Young
men, your first duty is to be prepared
for the struggle."
MILITARY EDUCATION-A DUTY
AND A PRIVILEGE
By establishing courses in military
training the University of Chicago will
benefit itself and the nation. It is not
so much the courses themselves that
will be valuable-though they will

prepare for commissions in the army.
What the university has done is to
recognize the relationship between
education and responsible citizenship.
Thousands of young men and young
women have been coming out of our
educational institutions without the
slightest inkling that they have ob-
ligated themselves to the state. Educa-
tion appears to them as something to
be acquired for selfish -ends, to help
them individually get on in the world.
It is not made clear to many of them
that the state would not spend money
on the establishment and encourage-
ment of schools and colleges unless
it expected something in return. It
wants responsible citizens, citizens
ready to bear intelligently the burdens
of national life.
Military education remfnds students
that they owe service to the state
which is helping them. The establish-
ment of the courses is a recommenda-
tion to parents to send their boys to
the University of Chicago. They will
be given opportunity to learn that they
are a part of the United States.-Chi-
cago Tribune.

%j
March Metropolitan. We're pretty
good huskers, but this is too much
for us.
Co-eds at the University of Wiscon-
sin have proved that they can live on
35 cents a day. But then everyone
isn't 'interested in .reducing.
Charlie Chaplin Loans Great Britain
$150,000.-Newspaper headline. Of
course he'll get the credit for the dol-
lar or two that we've got in it.
City News
The annual spring convention of
the Republicans of Washtenaw county
met at the courthouse at 11 o'clock
yesterday morning. William Bacon of
Chelsa was chosen chairman, and
Frank Ticknor of Pittsfield, secretary.
On account of the high price of ma-
terials, the building of the concrete
bridge to Island park may be aban-
doned for several years. Two bids al-
ready received are far in excess of
the $500 allowed for the bridge.
A council of local business men has
been organized to direct a big Boy
Scout movement in Ann Arbor. The
movement to enlarge the former or-
ganization of scouts in the city has
been under way for some time.
James W. Jackson, 72 years old, col-
ored, died at the home of his son last
night. He was a veteran of the Civil
war.
J. P. Rusche of Grand Rapids was
the lowest bidder for the erection of
the Broadway river bridge. His fig-
ures, which were $51,661.11 with road-
way and $50,375.91 without, were sev-
eral thousand dollars lower than the
next nearest bidder.
U. of Washington Gives Spanish Play
Seattle, Feb. 16.-A play in the
original Spanish was given on the
campus of the University of Washing-
ton on the evening of Feb. 8 by the
students in the Spanish department of
the university. The cast was trained
by members of the faculty of the
Spanish department.

[J T HE best things in life are the
commonest. Thar's plenty of
friendships - plenty of sunshine- E
plenty of landscape-an' yo' can get
VELVET at any
tobacco store.

"Y" Book
Excbange
openw illy.
Put vor
books on
sale at your
own price.
Excellent
bargains ay
be hadl.

I

^.,\
f-.
T J
I f
i -
' s I
j .
" ,'

LANDERS
OR
FLOWERS

-e lllli lf lllll l 1 1 1 1 llIIIlIlI I III I t IOllil !!lll lltilllilIIi tI81111f11111111111111111111li
-
MICHIGAN STUDENTS
We have what you want and the kind of service you desire.
_ s
Loose Leaf Note Books-Lab Outfits, Aprons, Shop c
Tools, etc., etc.
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES
ou oo olouo ol on onoononoillnooooonllrolo nool ouoooouooooolli onil oooonEll ooooil oi ootonooolil

PHONE 294

213 E.l

Liberty St.

.
"z "

Member of Florists' Telegraph
Delivery SEIIIe
Flowers by Wire to All the World.

WM. W. BEHRINGER
Announces the Opening of a Shop with
QUALITY HARDWARE
AND ELECTRICAL SPECIALTIES
AT 11 NICKELS ARCADE
Razor Blade Sharpening Done the Way
It Should Be Done

N
1'°

t a typewriter from
I. D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
will furnish you an instruction
k free of charge. You will be a
st before you know it.
Wtlomen
nior girls' play tryouts 9 o'clock
2 o'clock today in Sarah Caswell
ell hall.
'eshman party for junior advisors
:30 o'clock today in Barbour gym-
um.
N AEROPLANE NAIL SERVICE
ROM CHICAGO TO TWIN CITIES
. Paul, Minn., Feb. 16.-Aeroplanes
soon be carrying mail from Min-
>olis and St. Paul to Chicago, mak-
one round trip flight each day,
delivering in the Twin cities each
mail written in Chicago the same
The time row consumed by rail
2 hours for the 450 miles. Post-
er A. E. Purdy of Minneapolis,
Postmaster Otto N. Raths of St:
, are working together on the
who pays cash deserves discount.
;ive it in cash-coupons. Davis, at
Main. 13-17-18
cond-hand Text Books--Cords of
at Wahr's University Bookstore.
ncing classes and private lessons1
e Packard Academy. tfl
r results advertise in The Mich-

1 716 'i: -

You wear a 1916 1i: 9u16
suit.
But you wear 1716 hecl
wear leather heeh.
You drive a 1916 car, -v 1916
office or shop equipm n.ta, re
in a 1.916 house.
But your leather heels are out
of date.
Leather heels are as obsolete
as mustache cups, celluloid
dickeys and powdered peri-
wigs. They aren't adaptable
to modern conditions.
This is the day of rubber
heels. They are individual
sh ockabsorbers-spine savers
--that make the hardest pave-
ments as soft as a Brussels
carpet.
They are made for 1916 pavc
ments.
Bring your heels up-to-date.
Wear O'Sullivan's Heels of
New Live Rubber.
When you buy your new shoes, buy
them O'Sullivanized.
Insist onrO'Sullivanized shoes; the
new live rubber heels give the great-
est wear with the greatest resiliency.
Copyright, 1916, O'S. R. Co.
(^

aa
Some Fellows
.Get Cold
They don't seem to be ab
snow. They try to, poor;

C Y "
4N;3>
4e to stand the ice and t
chaps, but don't enjoy

.
_
4 ,J.
C _
l r G.. z.

: "i'.;
f . ''

themselves. Why is it? Not enough blood per-
haps. The furnace inside isn't working right. May-
be it hasn't the proper sort of fuel to work onr
There's a lot in this!
is good for sluggish furnaces. It's a good fuel. It
contains no slate or slag. Everything in it hag food
value. The sort that builds the body and creates
an inner warmth with which to combat icy blasts
of winter. Furthermore it possesses another vir-
tue. It is extremely pleasant to eat--satisfyingly
crisp and of a delicious flavor. It is always fresh,
always clean, always welcome at any time of day
or night. Give it a try out. It will qualify.

Chemistry Department Lacks Supplies
The quantitative chemistry labora-
tory classes are complaining of a
shortage' of supplies which is some-
what hampering their experiments.
This semester there are 70 students
working in one of the laboratories
where only 48 worked last year. The
supplies for this number are even less
than they were last year. The high
prices of supplies due to the increased
demand as a result of the European
war is one of the reasons given for
the shortage.'

Our sport department says that
eligibility is being declined in the fu-
ture tense. Boy, go out and buy us an
English grammar.
"We're a little upset this morning,
Mr. Gordon," he husked.-From the

The Shredded Wheat Co.

Niagara Falls, N. Y.

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