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February 17, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-17

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I W T YW L.J - E T A."1
ISNOW-SOUTH-WEST TO

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ioait

UNITED PRE
DAY AND NIGHZ
WIRE SER VICE

I

WEST WINDS

{.. _. __

VOL. XXVII. No. 93. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1917. PRICE FIVE

COURSES 6IYE N
EASTERNSCHOOLS
Big Seaboard Colleges Give Extensive
Military Training
Work
2,000 STUDENTS ENROLLED IN
CORNELL'S DRILL DEPARTMENT
Princeton Undergraduates Petition
Congress for Compulsory
Training
By L. S. T.
Preparations involving all of the
more important departments of mili-
tary and naval work are now being
carried on among the students of prac-
tically every large college and uni-
versity in the East
Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Cornell,
and Pennsylvania are taking the lead
in organizing their undergraduates
and, in those institutions which have
not had military training previous to
this time, extensive plans for furnish-
ing class room work and drills have
already been made. Government of-
ficers will shortly be detailed to be-
gin instruction.
Enthusiasm Is Country-Wide.
Enthusiasm in the great movement
'which is now sweeping over the edu-
cational institutions of the country is
particularly strong in the East. At
Cornell 2,000 students have enrolled
in the military department. Princeton
boasts 850 signers for the course in
military science. In addition to this
undergraduates of the Tiger institu-
tion to the number of more than 100
have joined an aero corps which will
be trained in handling aeroplanes.
Perhaps the first petition from an
undergraduate body for compulsory
universal military training comes from
Princeton. Last Friday such a peti-
tion, after the framers had received
the hearty approval of President Hib-
ben, was spread about the Tiger cam-
pus. As soon as a sufficient number
of signers has been secured the names
will be sent to Washington.
Tigers Want Universal Training.
The petition reads as follows: "We,
the undersigned, members of Prince-
ton university, Princeton, N. J., here-
by petition the congress of the United
States to enact immediately legisla-
tion establishing in the United .States
a system of compulsory universal mili-
tary training. We, as men upon whom
the burden of such training would
naturally fall, believe that under ac-
tual existing circumstances the time
has now arisen when such a step
should be taken."
At Harvard 600 students have' al-
ready signified their willingness to
elet a course in military science
which is about to be given there. The
student council in the same institu-
tion has issued an appeal for more
signers. An immense audience of stu-
dents attended a military mauss meet-
ing held in Cambridge last Tuesday.
President Lowell of Harvard urged the
men in an impassioned address to give
eed to the- responsibility which rests
upon them.
Harvard Students' Paper Is Bitter
The Harvard Crimson, in an edi-
torial published on the following
morning, criticizes the student body
bitterly for an indifferenje to the
seriousness of America's situation
which has only produced 600 signers
for the course in military science. The
editorial says in part: "We have had
enough parades; we have had enough
mass meetings, lectures, and exhorta-

tions. We have talked enough. We
have hesitated and delayed too long.
Action, and action alone, can be tol-
erated now."
Michigan students should not wait
for further action by the war depart-
ment in the matter of providing an
officer. The present situation in Wash-
ington may make it impossible for this
officer to be sent to us in the near fu-
ture. There is a large number of men
on the campus who have had a num-
ber of years experience in nearly all
branches of military science, includ-
ing actual experience in war.
Officers Among Michigan Students.
These men .are willing and anxious
to give students instruction. There:
are undergraduates on the campus
who have had military training inI
other schools during periods ranging
from two and three to as many as,
eight years. It would be a simple
(Continued on Page -Six)

PIailroad Jack Is
Back Home Again
Picturesque Wanderer Will Spend
Eight Hours Per Day Study-
ing in Library
Persons entering the University Li-
brary 'next Monday morning will see,
sitting at one of the tables and busied
with musty tomes and card index, a
short, powerfully built man, his face
bronzed by many a summer's sun, sur-
mounted by a mass of iron gray hair
a-toss. The hand that turns the page
is gnarled and weather-beaten.
For Railroad Jack, citizen of the
world, has once again returned to his
favorite haunts. Only the veriest
freshman is unacquainted with the
master of historical data, for 21 years
a familiar figure on the streets of De-
troit, and lately mourned as dead,
when one of his well known suit cases
was found floating in the Huron.
"I already have at my command a
total of 10,000 dates," said Jack to a
Daily reporter last evening, "and can
give accurate information concerning
5,000 persons in ancient and modern
history, but I hope to increase the
number during the next month by
eight hours daily study at the Li-
brary, after which I shall challenge
the world to produce my equal."
Railroad Jack is 53 years of age,
nind makes a practice of sleeping out-
'f-doors, no matter how bitter the
night. He has traveled approximately
75,000 miles, he said, in his journey-
ings up and down in the land, and has
collected more than $20,000 in nickles
and dimes from the street corner gath-
erings who have marveled at his re-
markable memory.
MANN SHUNS WAR1 WITH
COUNTRIES__Of EUROPE
THINKS U. 5, S. H EN0UGH TO DO
ON AMERICAN CONTIN-
ENT
Washington, Feb. 16. - The United
States has enough of a burden to do its
duty towards south and central Am-
erica without "undertaking to regulate
the conduct and civilization of all the
nations of Europe." Representative
Mann, minority leader, declared in the
house today. Mann was discussing the
huge army bill.
"I am determined to do everything
in my power to keep the nation out of
war," said Mann. Then he added, "if
it becomes necessary for us to lick
any foreign country I am willing to go
to the limit." The house broke into
loud cheers at this statement.
"I am trusting in hope and faith
that the President will do everything
which he thinks we can possibly do to
keep us out of the war. God only
knows where it will lead us. I be-
lieve that so far as we can we ought
to remain a dominant force on the
American continent, but I do not be-
lieve we are obliged to regulate the
world," he said.
ATTACKS JOURNALS
Stone Says They Viciously Publish
False Statements
Washington, Feb. 16.-A bitter at-
tack on journals which "published
renomous and false statements de-
signed to influence the United States
government in its attitude toward for-
'seign nations" was made -by Senator
Stone, chairman of the foreign rela-

tions committee, in the senate today.
The senator said that the newspapers
were publishing vicious propoganda to
i fluence public opinion in favor of
the allies.
SCENARIO CONTESTANTS MEET
MONDAY; EXPLAIN CONDITIONS
-Due to the conflict with the meeting
ing; of the opera scenario writers yes-
terday afternoon, the meeting of the
Comredy club scenario contestants was
postponed until 4 o'clock Monday aft-
ernoon. All of those who have en-
tered the contest and those who wish
to enter it at this time are requested
to be present as the contest closes
March 1. Mr. Lyman Bryson of the
rhetoric department and Morrison
'Wood, '17, will be present to answer
.any questions aid explain the condi-
tions of the contest. The meeting will
'be held in room 201 West hall.

BONE-DRY IQUORBILL
PASSED IN us St SENATE
WOULD PROHIBIT MAILING 'WET'
ADVERTISEMENTS INTO
'DRY' STATES
Washington, Feb. 16.-Containing a
drastic provision against the importa-
tion of liquor into prohibition states,
the postoffice bill passed the senate to-
day. The measure appropriated $330,-
000,000. Newspapers and other period-
icals containing liquor advertisements
are excluded from the mails when
destined for prohibition territory.
The liquor exclusion bill fostered by
Senator Reed of Missouri is the first
step taken in the direction of national
prohibition since the District of Co-
lumbia dry bill passed the senate, and
it was the cause of bitter fighting. Op-
positionhsenators opposed it as being
so drastic as to deter states wishing
to adopt "moderate prohibition meas-
ures" from doing so.
The bill has already passed the
house.
REPORT' 8 BANDITS
CROSSED U.S. LINE
War Department LearnsI Mexican
Raiders Deliberately Murdered
Three Men
Washington, Feb. 16.-G eneral Tag-
gart, commanding Fort Ringgold, to-
day reported to the war department.
that eight bandits crossed the Mexican
border into the United States last
night at Foldat ranch. One man and
seven horses were captured. Seven
bandits on foot in the brush are be-
ing chased.
The war department this afternoon
received official confirmation of the
finding of the bodies of three Amer-
ican ranchers illed in the Mex a
raid of Tuesday night. The report
said: "Captain Maize from Corner
ranch reports Andrew Peterson, Hugh
Acord, and Bert Jensen were found
about half a mile south of Monument
Fifty. They were shot through the
head, and were apparently deliberate-
ly murdered."
Says Paper Shortage is Artificial
Washington, Feb. 16.-The federal
trade commission, following months
of investigation, today announced a
remark offered by Lewis Print, paper
manufacturer, who said that the alleg-
ed paper shortage is largely artificial
and the prices exhorbitant.
Many Attend Women's League Party
A large number of women danced
at the first of the series of Friday
parties given this semester by the
Women's league from 4 to 6 o'clock
yesterday afternoon in the Barbour
gymnasium. On next Friday the Mor-
tar-board society is to provide the en'
tertainment.
PRESIDENT MEETS
CABINET MEMBERS
Inference Drawn, That International
Situation Is Somewhat
Brighter
Washington, Feb. 16.-The cabinet
met today for less than an hour with
President Wilson, the shortest session
in weeks. From the conversation of
the members at the conclusion of the
session the inference was drawn that
the international situation is certainly
no worse and might be regarded as a

little brighter. As usual, none of the
cabinet members would discuss any
feature of the international situation.
Germans Cut Rations of Belgians
London, Feb. 16.-Authentic in-
formation reached London this after-
noon stating that Germany has re-
duced by one-half the rations set
aside for the civilian population in
Belgium.

You Never Can Tell What
They'll Do These Days

21 SHIPS ARRI
IN N. Y. HAREI

By Sarah Made
Quietly Thursday was a fine day.
Moreover it was the day after Val-
entine's day. There was a sort of
lazy "let's walk and talk" feeling in
the air. The boulevard was covered
with the people looking for The Robin.
Because of the nature of the sport,
they were in twos, one-half of each
couple being a man. Some of them
had a feeling the bird frequented
State street, and "brave men of Mich-
igan" were seen there accompanied
by-well accompanied.
There was another reason for its
feeling like spring. There were so
many flowers about. Most of them
grew in bunches on the front -of the
other half of the couple's coat. Lots
of them were a bit the worse for wear.

Every man walking beside a bunch
tried to look as though he had sent it.
The Sweetest Thing in the World tried
to look that way too. To her ac-
companiment (,well why not call him
that) the S. T. I T. W. said some-
thing like this, "I won't either. Just
why should I tell you? It wouldn't
make any difference if you did know,
would it?" (Worlds of hope in the
"would it.")
Two seconds later the sky became a
dull gray, the air lost its springlike
quality and bleakest November set in
All because the friendly florist clerk
came along and said, "Oh, I see you're
wearing them, I'm glad they're all
right. I didn't understand your order
at first. Just like spring isn't it."
Just like what???

First Vessel from
Drops Anchor;
Craft Were

Calais in B
Report That
Convoyed

INVESTIGATES HONOR
SYSTEM__IFRACTIONS
COMMITTEE CONSIDERS CASES
OF STUDENTS CHARGED
WITH CHEATING
Several reported violations of the
honor system which were committed
;luring the final examinations of the
Literary college were considered at a
meeting of the honor committee yes-
terday afternoon. These cases are
now under investigation and if suffici-
ent evidence is discovered the stu-
dents implicated will be brought be-
fore the committee on next Tuesday.
Reports have been received by Dean
John R. Effinger of the literary col-
lege from several professors of the
college stating whether the honor sys-
tem was employed in their classes or
not, and in some cases how it worked
where it was adopted. - The general
tone of these reports seems to favor
the synem and shows that it has been
successful.
Students or members of the faculty
who wish to report any further viola-
tions of the honor system should mail
them to the honor committee at the
Michigan Union.
WISCONSIN WOMEN STUDENTS
THRIVE ON 85 CENTS A DAY
Madison, Wis., Feb. 16.-The women
of the University of Wisconsin in a
test of household economy proved
they can be happy and possibly not
fat, but certainly well fed, on a ration
costing about 35 cents a day. This
was the figure reached in the case of
a group of 30 girls, who are experi-
menting in the various ways of reduc-
ing the high cost of living without im-
pairing their physiques. They live in
three community houses and share
the housekeeping work. They find,
according to a university bulletin, that
they canlive on $3.75 a week, of which
$1.10 is rental.
DR G. R. LA RUE APPOINTED
BIOLOGICAL CAMP DIRECTOR
The Board of Regents has just ap-
pointed Dr. George R. La Rue of the
department of zoology director of the
University biological camp to succeed
Prof. O. C. Glaser. No further change
has been made in the staff that had
charge of the work there last year
except by adding to it Mr. Walter
Keltz, who will become an assistant
in animal ecology.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* PRESIDENT TO DELIVER *
COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS *
* _ _*
* President Harry B. Hutchins has *
* accepted an invitation to deliver *
* the commencement address this *
* year at Ohio State university. The *
* president will speak in Columbus, *
* June 5 at 10 o'clock in the morn- *
ing. *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

HOLD SPECIAL EXAMS
FOR FINAL ABSENTEES

LIT

STUDENTS MUST SIGN
NEXT WEEK TO REMOVE

UPI

DELINQUENCIES
All students in the College of Lit-
erature, Science, and ,the Arts who
were absent from any ,of the recent
final examinations must fill out a
blank in the registrar's office in or-
der to make up the examination
missed. The blanks must be filled out
during the second week of the cur-
rent semester, beginning Monday,
Feb. 19. Only students who missed
final examinations for good cause will
be allowed to make them up.
The examinations will be held the
fourth week of the current semester
in the registrar's office, under the su-
pervision of the registrar. The reg-
istrar will receive the examination
questions from the propu'r instructor,
give the examination, and return the
blue book to that instructor to be
graded, after which the student will
be given his mark for the semester's
work.
SPEAKERS ENTERED
FOR FIRST DEBATE
Northern Oratorical League to Start
Contests Monday After-
uDO01
Entries and dates in the preliminary

WIRELESS MESSAGE REPORTS
LINER PHILADELPHIA SA
Germany Asked If Yarrowdale Pri
ers Are Released; Free Ger.
man Sailors
New York, Feb. 16.-Twenty-
merchant ships entered New York :
bor today. Two-thirds of them c
through the submarine zone.
Headed by the White Star l1
Canopic, the largest of the fleet,
ships dropped anchor in the
Among them was the French fig
Hainaut, which cleared from Ca
almost under the German guns.
is the first ship to enter this port f
Calais in more than a year.
Three of the vessels were fi
french ports, four from British, tb
from Dutch, two from Italian, and
from Spanish and Portuguese.
cording to report,. they were convi
a great part of the way by warshi
A wireless message. from the An
ican liner Philadelphia, relayed
New York, and a cable from Liver
said all was well with the liner.
message gave no position, but it
assumed that she was safe outside
danger zone on her Liverpool to :
York trip.
Washington, Feb. 16.-Germany
been firmly asked if the Amer
Yarrowdale prisoners have been
leased, as reported in present
patches, the state department n
known late today. The note cont
ing a demand for the release of
prisoners, which was prepared -
terday by the department, is be
held, pending a reply from the
perial government to the inquiry s
today.
Washington, Feb. 16.-All Gern
sailors in this country who were t
porarily placed in custody while
formation was being secured show
attempts to sink German vessels
block American harbors, have I
released, except in those cases wh
actual violation of the criminal
tutes has been reported, it was oflic
ly announced this afternoon.
WEBSTER DEBATER
ELECT OFFICE]

contests of the Northern Oratorical I Iron to

league have been announced. The
juniors will speak in room B of the law
building at 4 o'clock on Monday after-
noon. The speakers are: F. W. Cone,
Lois May, C. J. Watts, Verne Lay-
ton, E. F. Gasar, and N, T. Bolles.
The sophomores will speak in room
B at 7:30 o'clock on Tusday evening.
Their speakers are: Herbert Parzen,
Frank Rowley, W. P. S' ndford, D. R.
Hertz, Kelsey Guilfoil, Vernon Lan-
caster, and P. E. Chollette.
The following seniors will speak at
7:30 o'clock Wednesday evening in the
same room: S. Katzuizumi, George W.
Miller, C. H. Hsiu, R. M. Carson, Olive
Hartzig, Eva Sharrow, C. H. Schulte,
C. S. Toplon, O. P. Lambert, C. A. Frye,
and H. B. Teegarden.
Following these preliminary contests
two seniors, two juniors, and one
sophomore will be chosen to compete
in the finals which will be held on
March 2 in University Hall. One man
will then be selected to represent
Michigan in the Northern Oratorical
league contest.
DISCOVER PLOT TO SMUGGLE
OPIU3I INTO UNITED STATES
San Francisco, Cal., Feb. 16.-Evi-
dence of an international opium smug-
gling ring with its base in Mexico and
connections in Shanghai, Honolulu,
~ Chicago, and New York, and other
American cities, was uncovered here
today, according to United States gov-
ernment agents, who said the state de-
partment would be asked to help break
it up.
Within a year more than 30,000 cases
of opium have been shipped to Mex-
ico, according to government repre-
sentatives. Most of this went to a re-
fining plant in Mexico City, Justus
Wardell, collector of the port of San
Francisco, said. Two men were un-
der arrest.

Be Sworn in at Next
of Organization on
Friday

The Wel ster Debating society h
its semiannual election of officers l
evening in the society's room in t
law building. Oliver Phillips, '1
was elected president; Arthur
Bogue, '18L, vice-president; John
Colden, '18L, secretary; Robert
Tucker, special, treasurer; Jacob
Tolonen, '17L, parliamentarian, a
Jas. P. Clark, '17L, sergeant-at-arr
These officers-elect will be sworn
at the meeting next Friday even!
when the term of the presentoffic
expires.
BRITAIN RECEIVES $150,000
LOAN FROM CHARLIE CHAPI
London, Feb. 16.-Charlie Chap:
America's movie star, is a $150,
contributor to England's "win
war" loan, subscriptions for which
Closing today in a whirlwind fini
The man whose movie antics ho
brought him a fortune, cabled his si
scription from Los Angeles today,
was announced.
GETS FOUR MONTHS IN JAIL
FOR LIBELING WASHINGT
Tacoma, Wash., Feb. 16.-For h
ing written an article libeling
memory of George Washington, P
H. Haffer today began serving
sentence of four months in the cou:
jail. Costs in the case, which he v
probably also serve, amount to seve
hundred dollars.
Railroad Men to Prepare Waf Pl
New York, Feb. 16.-Washington :
called upon the railroad men of
country to prepare a plan of milit,
transportation and communication
use when necessity arises.

t

Catholic Students' Club
Will Meet At
Packard Academy
Saturday, February 17th
2:30-5:30

' .

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