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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 19, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

f =-- ....

m

,.

All Sits and Overcoats

Calkins

MARTHA WASHINGTON

I

ALL

CANDIES

SOCIETY BRAND

1-4 ff

Drug

Carried in stock at our

Suits and Overcoats

Co2

South University Ave. Store
Cor. Church St.

Blues and Blacks
Bath Robes
Odd Trousers

. 20% off
20% off
. 20% off

1-4 Off

I

W adhams & Co.

Nickels Arcade
State St.

Wadhams Corner
Main St.

smaam

J-HOP ROVkhS, OF COUUSE----
there isn't a more important thing in view on the campus than
the J--(op-,- unless it be examinations!
The dresses we've chosen for it are perfectly beautiful-
beautifully perfect!
TiLE SHOWiNG IIERE IS TO LAST ONLY A FEW DAYS

Hutzel 's

M~AIN IN!) LIBERTY

Your Floral Needs==
Are BES T SA ISFIED By Us
P1IONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION

American and Spanish Systems of
f Porto Rican Government Compared
Galo W. Blanco, grad., writes of the executive, judicial and legislative de-
government of Porto Rico in the first partment. The chief executive is the
installment of the second article of a governor appointed by the President
series about that country apearing in of the United States for a term of
The Daily. four years with the advice and con-
sent of the senate. The first civil gov-
Before passing on to a consideration ernor of Porto Rico was Hon. Charles
of the present government in Porto H. Allen.
Rico under the American rule, it The President of the United States
would be well to give a hasty account also appoints an executive council
of the government of the island be- consisting of eleven members: a sec-
fore 1898. retary, an attorney general, a treasur-
Porto Rico was under the control er, and auditor, a commissioner of the
of Spain for 350 years. In 1870 it was interior, a commissioner of education,
made a province of Spain instead of a and five other persons of good repute.
colony. The supreme local authority At least five of the members of the
was vested in a governor-general, who executive council must be natives of
reported to the Spanish king or queen. Porto Rico. At present seven Porto
He controlled all civil and military Ricans and four Americans are mem-
affairs, made the laws, and acted as bers of the council. Each of the mem-
judge in interpreting them. bers of the council is at the head of
There were four courts: the ter- certain departments such as the de-
ritorial, or surpreme court, and three partment of labor, charity, and cor-
criminal courts. Each department into rections.
which the island was divided had a The executive council is similar in
military commandant, and each vil- many respects to the United States
lage an alcalde, representing the gov- senate. Corresponding to the United
ernor. There was also a central ad- States house of representatives there
ministration for collecting taxes. For is a house of delegates elected by the
administrative purposes the island people. It consists of 35 persons, five
was divided into seven departments, chosen from each of the seven dis-
including seventy villages. tricts into which the island is divided
In 1897 Porto Rico received the sys- according to population. The executive
tem of autonomy. Under it the is- council and the house of delegates to-
land had a premier and a house of rep- gether make up the legislative assem-
resentatives, and the other forms of a bly of Porto Rico. This assembly
republican government, but they were manages the civil affairs of the island.
all in the hands of a Spanish oligarchy, A bill may originate in either house.
which controlled the island when it It oan not become a law until it has
was still a colony. passed both houses by a majority vote
On Oct. 18, 1898 the American flag of the members of each house and has
floated over the legislative hall of San been approved by the governor with-
Juan for the first time. For 19 months in ten days thereafter. The legisla-
the island had a military government. ture does not pass appropriations.
Porto Rico is neither a state nor a The President of the United States
territory. It is a possession of the appoints a district judge, a district
United States and its government is attorney, and a marshall for each dis-
regulated and controlled by congress- trict. These are at the head of the
ional acts. The Foraker act provid- United States district courts. There
ing for a special form of government are five judges in the supreme court
was passed by congress in 1900. In of Porto Rico. Three of these are
May of the same' year civil govern- Porto Ricans and two Americans.
ment was established in Porto Rico. There are 32 municipal judges ap-
The Foraker act provided for an pointed by the people.
MORE COLLEGE STUDENTS C im r
TAKE BUSINESS COURSES Iie
-- Factor in Trade
A striking feature of the annual re- a
port of some of the great universi- Washington Professor Urges Greater
ties of the country is the large in-1.4.

J. F. WUERTH CO.
New Day Light Store next to Orpheum

AT

Clothes and Accessories
THE
Varsity Toggery
SHOP
1107 S. University Ave.

Electric Auto Heater-Keeps Your Engine Warm
Costs very little to operate

Typewriting
Multigraphing
Mimeopraphing

Washtenaw Electric Shop
The Shop of Quality
U its net Righit we make it Right

f Hamilton Business College
* State and William

J-HOP

TYPEWRITERS
For Rent or Sale

Phone 273

200 East Washington St.

F

MORE MEN WANTED FOR
AMBULANCEFIELD l-WORK
OVER 200 CARS ALREADY BEING
DRIVEN BY AMERICANS
IN WAR ZONE

RUSSIA HOLDS KEY TO
WHOLE WAR SITUATIl

=COUINS & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.

SOMETHING LIABLE TO
AT ANY TIME AND
CONFLICT

BLOW
END

GRUEN' NVERITHIN
WATCHES

$25.00 UPWARDS

HALL ER &FULLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS

U.

hi

The
Cyc-Corpus ins
System

PUBLISHEDBY
The American La Book Co.
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

A TALBOT a
W RROW
FormNCOLLARS
are curve cut to fit the
shouCerS pefc sey a.
Cktett, Peabody &Co:lnce.9%aker

Prohibition E outest Held in March
The annual oratorical contest of the
Intercollegiate Prohibition association
will be held early in MViarch. At this,
time a representative will be chosen
to go to the state contest, which will
be held in Kalamazoo in April. The
local contest is open to any student
in the University. All those expect-
in; to take part should notify at once
either 11. 1. Teegarden, '17, or L. S.
Rauisdell, '17.
Cvilegioe AluiniCa-e to Meet ikwrrIw
7Memnbers of the Association of Col-

Wisconsin Sends Five Men to Front
Myadison, Wis., Jan. 18.-The ambu-
lance corps in the European war zone
will soon have five men from the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin. Three sailed this
month.
A movement has also been started
among students at the university to
raise funds to send an ambulance to
France.

The American ambulance field serv-
ice with headquarters at 40 State
street, Boston, has just sent out an
appeal to Michigan men for volunteer
service as ambulance drivers in
France. The organization is now on
the point of greatly enlarging the
service in France and a considerable
number of places are available. These
places will be filled as far as possible
by men from the leading universities
of this country.
This service has already more than
200 cars driven by American volun-
teers, mostly university men, grouped
in sections which are attached to di-
visions of the French army. These
sections have served at the front in
Flanders, on the Somme front, on the
Aisne, in Champagne at Verdun, in
Lorraine and Alsace. One of the vet-
eran sections has received the signal
tribute from the French army staff of
being attached to the French army of
the Orient in the Balkans.
Americans have reason to be proud
of the chapter which these few hun-
dred youths have written intohthe his-
tory of the time. Each of the several
sections of the American ambulance
field service as a whole and 54 of their
individual members have been dec-
orated by the French army with the
Croix de Guerre or the Medaille Mill-
taire for valor in the performance of
their work.
The American ambulance service has
recently been described by a member
of General Joffre's staff as the "Finest
flower of the magnificent wreath of-
fered by the great America to her lit-
tle Latin sister." The appeal just sent
out adds that there are surely many
more of the sterling youths of Amer-
ica who would like to add their little
to that wreath.
Information as to the requirements
and qualifications are available at the
Boston headquarters.

crease in the number of students tak-
ing technical or business courses, as
compared with those studying to
qualify themselves for what were
once considered the only professional
careers, divinity, pedagogy, law and
medicine, says the Seattle Post-Intelli-
gencer.
The Yale report for example, shows
that between 1904 and 1916 the num-
ber of law students increased 27 per
cent; the number of medical students
increased 20 per cent, and the number
preparing for the ministry increased
10 per cent, while there was 29 per
cent increase in the number preparing
to teach.
In the studies leading to a business
or an industrial career the increase
was 99 per cent. In the engineering
courses alone the increase was 160
per cent. The number of students in
this university now taking courses
leading to business or industrial
careers is almost exactly equal to the
number studying for professional
work.
Japanese Books in Library
An exhibit of ten books, handsomely
bound, and containing hand colored
photographs of the gardens, flowers,
and costumes of Japan, has been ar-
ranged by Prof. F. D. Goodrich and
is now on display in the exhibition
cases of the Library. The books are
bound in the Japanese style with dou-
ble leaves. They are published by T.
B. Millet of Boston.

Familiarity with Oriental
Language
Seattle, Wash., Jan. 19.-The good
will of the Chinese for Americans is
of the great value to our business men
if they will recognize it in time and
energetically and understandingly en-
ter the oriental field of commercial en-
terprise, according to Professor Macy
M. Skinner, who for several years was
engaged in educational work in China.
He is now assistant professor of Ger-
man at the University of Washington
and also teaches the Chinese lang-
guage.
An understanding of the language
of the Chinese people is an essential
factor in successful trade relations, he
says. He points out that an evening
course in Chinese was offered for Eng-
lish business men in Shanghai{ last
winter. The Germans in Shanghai
have long given such courses.
"Not only will there be a need for
graduates from our commercial
courses but also for our engineers for
constructing railroads and developing
the mines and industrial plants," said
Professor Skinner in discussing the
need for the new course in the Chi-
nese language to be opened at the
university Feb. 1.
"Our west coast will profit espe-
cially by the enormous trade that is
sure to be developed with China, and
men trained not only to handle our
various manufactured products but
familiar with the Chinese language
will be urgently needed.'

i
1
l
t
1
1
l
t
f
t
t
z
i
t
I

Washington, Jan. x8.-"Keep your
eye on Russia; there is a seething vol-
cano," is the advice of the Cologne
Gazette. In this advice also is to be
found the interpretation placed by the
best informed Germans in the United
States on the constant pressure the
central powers are exerting against
Russia, with a threat against Odes-
sa and the possibility of an attempt to
roll up the Russian line on the Aus-
trian front, are regarded as a part of
the German plan to bring about a sep-
arate peace with Russia.
"Armed with accurate information
as to the internal affairs of Russia, one
begins to gain a fair perspective of
the possibilities there," said Dr.
Barthelme. ,
"The situation is delicate and -the
lid may blow off at any time. To be-
gin with, you must know that in Rus-
sia there are two parties with widely
different objects in view. One party
looks to the west, the other to the east
and south. Two months ago the party
of the east gained the ascendancy and
deposed Premier Stuermer, on the
ground that he was of German an-
tecedents and disposed to make a sep-
arate peace with Germany, looking
perhaps to the establishment of a Rus-
sian warm water port on the Indian
ocean with the assistance of Germany,
Austria, Bulgaria and Turkey.
"The party of the east thereupon
placed in power as premier Mr. Tre-
poff on the theory that the future of
Russia was to be found in the far east.
His party was in the ascendancy when
Russia came into collision with Ja-
pan. His party was the one which
sought to make of Dalny in Manchuria
the great warm water port of the Rus-
sian empire. His party is the one
which is in closest communion and
sympathy with the entente allies, and
committed to the theory that by coali-
tion with those allies Russia is to ob-
tain what she seeks, whether in the
far east or in Turkey by the capture
of Constantinople.
"But here again we have evidence
that there is serious disturbance in
Russia as to thernature of which we
can only surmise. For in less than
two months we see Trepoff retired and
Russia shaken by a series of events
which speak of the most drastic action
on the part of the ruling oligarchy.
"I refer to the nomination of Prince
Golitzin for the office of premier and
the assassination of Rasputin, the
priest, who had secured such an in-
fluence over the czar and also over
certain members of the oligarchy.
Prince Golitzin is a pronounced reac-
tionary. He is the leading advocate
of the old order. His creed is 'To
hell with the duma and with represent-
ative government.' He is, I may say,
the biggest reactionary in all Russia."
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
use the Michigan Daily as their adver-
tiaig medium.
The Michigan Daily for service.

Students Ann
Another desertio
bachelorhood occ
when Harold D. K
I d i Mi Vthrvr

rieu iiss amryi
legiate Alumnae will meet at 3:80 of Music,, in Deti
o'clock Saturday alternoon in the are well kliown
home of t!rs. 11. ate-. 1"21 Camn-groom belonging
bridge road, to discuss ousiness of Kappa fraternity
great importane. A fun attendance a member of the
is (lesired. rority.

ounee Marriage
on from the ranks of
urred last Saturday
oonsman, '17E, mar-
n Thompson, School
roit. The principals
in Ann Arbor, the
to the Phi Sigma
and the bride being
Mu Phi Epsilon so-

Leave Copy Leave Copy
at at
Quarry's and Students'
The Delta Supply Store
ADVERTISING

EDUCATION THE PREPARATION
FOR WORLD-FORCE CONTACTS
"Education may be defined as put-
ting one's self in condition to make
contracts with the forces of the world,"
said Judge Victor 11. Lane in his ad-
dress on "An Essential of Education"
at the Y. W. C. A. vesper service yes-
terday afternoon. "You will want to
use these forces for yourselves and for
others, so it is necessary that you see
what they are and how you can make
the contact with them.
"A large proportion of the wisest
people believe that contact with the
spirit of Christianity is the greatest
force making for good in the universe,"
the speaker concluded, "and you can-
not afford not to think about your re-
lation with this greatest force."
Miss Norah Crane Hunt of the
School of Music gave several musical
numbers.
Regular Assembly at the Armory
Saturday night. 18-19

LOST.
LOST-To avoid arrest, two students
rtaining my black bull pup will
i eturn bo immediately. I mean
business. 19
LO-T-Tau Beta i'i key on campus or
State st. Mesterday noon. Finder
leave at iPaily office and receive re-
ward. 19
LOST-Don't wish for that lost article
--Recover it by an ad in The Daily.

IISCELLANEOUS
A J-HOP OPPORTUNITY- For Rent
-A Buick 7-passenger machine
with driver. By hour or trip. Ad-
ress B. E. G., 110 12th St., City.
18-19-20
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Set of Harvard Classics
-Dr. Elliott's Five Foot Shelf. Call
A. A. Kimberley at 906 or write to
1824 Geddes Ave. 14-20incl

SPECIAL AFTER INVENTORY SALE
Musical Instruments, Cases etc.
We have a number of New and shop worn VIOLINS-MANDOLINS
GUITARS - BANJO MANDOLINS - CASES etc., which we
have REDUCED TO A REMARKABLY LOW FIGURE! These
bargains must be seen to be appreciated. Look them over.

11

Grinniell Bros.

116 S. Main t.
PHONE 1707

t' 1'

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