100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 01, 1916 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


U

I

E1, I

rY BASh1E

A iL

iL

I
AIST BELLE' ISLE'
FOR MICHISAN
'ARROLJ1 RUNS THIREE ANI) ONE.

would not have changed the result
of the meet in the slightest.
This win makes two victories for
the Wolverines out of the four pos-
sible chances.. Of the other two races,
one was a clear defeat at the hands of
the Syracuse veterans and a place in
the Intercollegiate cross country run
which showed a marked improvement
over last year. Coach Farrell is well
satisfied with the team's record.
CORNELLIANS 23-s
Slivrek's Toe and Red Team's Line
Fall to Hold Mr. Rmvardt
Berry

ItALF SMILES
AND 17

IN 19 M1INUTES
SE CONDS

ANNEX CUP PERMANENTLY
MIicidg an .len Take First Three Places
and Sev en Out of First 11
Places
Michigan wound up the 1916 cross
country season yesterday by winning
the Belle Isle race, by the lowest pos-
sible score, six points. Eddie Carroll
took individual honors easily, running
three and one-half' miles' in 19 min-
utes and 17 seconds.
Michigan captured the first three
places in a row, FTox and Sedwick fol-
lowing Car roll past the tape in handy
style. Benson, of the Finnish athletic
club, of Detroit, ran fourth, with Cap-
tain Kuivenen taking fifth. Bachtel
of the Wolverine team placed sixth
with Harbin, of Albion, taking seventh,
followed by Bouma of the winning
team with the Detroit Y. M. C. A.
spearing ninth and another Albion
runner getting tenth. Fuess, of Mich-
igan, finished eleventh. Out of the
first eleven places Michigan took sev-
en, including the first three.
The cup offered by the Detroit "Y"
was permanently annexed by the Anti
Arbor delegation yesterday, the .vic-
tory making the third consecutive win
in the Detroit "Y's" Thanksgiving Day
event. Three wins were required to
take away the. troply. In addition
to the main award, seven out of the
13 cups .offered for individual show-
ing were brought back to Ann Arbor
by members of the Maize and Blue
team.
Albion college took second in the
meet with the seventh, tenth and
thirteenth places to their credit, a
total of 30 points. Michigan thus had
a margin of 24 points to win. Only
the first thr~ee places counted for each
team.
Owing to another meet held at
Grand Rapids yesterday a great many
of the Michigan institutions failed to
enter the race at Detroit. The teams
running strongest in the Belle Isle
classic were Michigan, .Albion, De-
troit Y. M. C. A., Finnish athletic club
of Detroit, and Detroit Central.
Addington, the Albion harrier who
ran second to. Carroll in the state meet
ot East Lansingr nearly three weeks
ago, was not entered in yesterday's;
affair. His running might have low-
ei~ed the Albion score somewhat, but
Watch for the ;rand opening of Ann
Arbor's Finest Floral Shop. Nickels
ArcAde. 34!
FOUR HAYS UNTIL
JIICIIANENSIAN SUB SCRIPTION

RECORD

CROWD SEES

GAME

Franklin Field, Philadelphia, Nov.
30.-Ofn the ,totem pole at the niver-
sity of Pennsylvania a Cornell scalp~
was hung this afternoon for the first
time since 1912. Under furious smash-,
ing by a lighter team playing on a*
sodden, marshy field, the Ithacans
went down to defeat at-the-hands of
the Red and Blue team by the score
of 23 to 3. Despite the size of the
score it was one of the hardest fought
games ever seeu here.
It brought to Franklin field the larg-
est crowd on record, 32,000 persons,
filling every bit of available space, It
was the football classic for Penn and
Cornell. Cornell's~ vaunted line fell
like tissue paper until the third period
when 'it stiffened<.
Shiverick after th2e first five min-
utes of play, i could" not get within
reach of ,Penn's goal\ with hils famous
toe. Howard Berry; the, Penn full-
back, workled liike a wizrd and was
given mu~ch of jhe credit for the vic-
tory.
SECOND DEFATLESS.ThAR
Pittsburg, Nov~. .The tUniaty
of Pittsburg comJpleted its second year
withou~t .a single defeat- he= he
soycity eleven smothered~ Penn~
State College under a 31 to 0 scor'e
this afternoon. At no stage of the
game was State College dangerous,
Pittsburg finding no difficulty in keep-
ing the ball always in alien territory.
Use The Michigan Daily Want Ads
for results.

Would the Court. Game Succeed
As a JiajorSport at Mlichigan,
Now are come the ielanchaoly days. The football season is over. The
last game has~ been played, the last cheer has been given, the letters have
been awarded. Ina a few~ days next year's captain will be elected anld then
the campus will resign itself to th~e dilbusiness of evistence unitil spring
bringsbaseball, and rlif
Winter at Michidgani is a drab sort or an affair. Thera is~ no point at
whichi all campus. interests meet. In the fall the student body gets to-
gether at the football gwnes and yells in concert its commendation of the
team's work~. In the spring, the studlents once more gather oni Ferry field
and give vent to unanimnousi appeals to Brandell for a two-bagger' or to Ead-
die CarrolIl for a little extra spurt. But during the 'Winter there is no such
commingling ~ of interests. The campus is ice-bound 'within and withot.t:
Each petty organization has its o'-n affairs uppermost. T'his club gives a
dance, that society- gives a smoker, but the hearty interest in some common
line of en deavorjs is missing.
Many remnedies for this condition hav.e been suggested. Class athletics,
have been deveoped to a hi h degree but they mus~t necessarily fail to
produce a campus .wvide. attention. Indoor track has attempt~ed to fill. the
aching void between November and April but Michigan's indoor track £
schodul~e is not one clculated to elici'. any wild enhuism,
-THEME IS ONLY ONE JREMEDY 11031.JTHIS STATE OF AFFIRS AiD
THAW TIS VARSITY BAS$KETBALL -MICHIG'4N IS THE ONLY COLLEGE
IN THE~ WEST WITH1 ANY- ATHLETIC. PRETGE WHATEVER THA
ITOES NOT HAVE A~ VARSITY BASK Y'BALL TEAM.
.The-only objection that has been raised in the' past against, the" stahlish~
ment of a Varsity basketball team was that the gymnasium. woildn ot ac-
commodate the spectators. With the remodeled Waterman giizasm,
ready for use in a few days, that argument cann-olonger hold force. _Thre
will be ampile room to accommodate the spectators a, t a baetball anie,
Officials of .the intramural athletic department state that ther'e .,i'mre
interest in basketball than in any other inter-elass sport. Last winter tle~
were 17 teams centered in the class basketball league," using during te
course of the season a total of over 200 players.'The intramural offilcials
are also responsible for the statement that the quality of-play illt the bask- ..
etball league is above that of the play in any, other intexclass sport. Thie
all-campus team of last year could have gone onto the flor without havig
practiced together and given the aver^,ge college l ive the battle of itS lit
It would no1 be difficult to secure competition1 for, he~ teamn. For the irst
year or so it might be necessary to bock gamnes enitirely with teams - h
minor college division but until the sport was firmlJy 'stablished heav; eoz
petition would not be desirable. There are- scores of middle,-western col-
leges with good reputations in the court ga.me who-would be more than glad-
to have a Wolverine game on their schedules. .-.Besides these there are the',
big colleges of the east, south, and Missouri yale-ywit~h whom r'elation,
might be established. Then there are indepenfdent teams in thils section ci
the country that are counted among the strongs in America. Teams of
this type are the Y. M. C. A., the Rayls, and the Burro ughs,~ of Detroit; a1dl'
the Buckeye Paints, of Toledo. M. A. C. su~,eeed in fillin~g a scheduile of 1
from 15 to 20 games every year, and there is to rea son wh y Michigan, witli
h er greater preptige and her eastern athletic aflliances could nopt turn the1
tripk much easier.
MIlICHIGAN ALUMNI ARE WONDERING WHY THEA UNIVERSITY IS NOTI
GETTING MORE PREP SCHOOL STAR1S. ONE REASON YS THAT TWO-
SNORT MEN, TJHAT IS, MEN WHO PLAY BOTH FOOTBALL AND BASK-1
F'TBALI1, WILLI NOT COME TO A SC1OOL- WHERE Tn EY CANNOTc
COMPETE IN BOTH SPORTS.
It is known beyond a shadow of doubt thaat Mi~chigan has lost many men
for this very reason. The average football player makes a goo'd basket-
ball player. Many of the same qualities are demanided of participants in'
both games and the football-basketball comibination is a common one among
prep-school boys. It is only natural that a ~boy~, finding himself adept in both _
sports, should give his preference to a college where he could compe te int
both. Many of the brighest stars of the gridiron are also basketball play-,

ers. Elmer Oliha~nt,called{ by ~some
the greatest halfback of the decade, isa t ra h o r a e at rs
coll, w~hose sensational playing brought
Northwestern into the runnier-up pos-
ition in the western conference, is also
team. Nels jorgren and Paul lDesJar-
(liens;9 .OfChiago, Gene van Gen~t and
Jumbo Stiehm, of Wisconsi, George.
Gauthier and the Miller brothers of M.
A. C., these a-re. only, a few of the
great players who have graced both
gridiron an~d court.~
Michigan~ wants a Varsity basketball
team, first, because the student body
has shown by its interest in the class
gamhes that it is ndeeded; second, be-
cause the athletic void between foot-
-ball and baseball should be filled by
some Varsity sport and basketball is
the only one that i's practicable; and,
thrd, because the 'sport will aid in
b~ringin~g prep-school athletes to the
Un~iversity. In opposition, there seems
to be no objection that cannot easily
be met.-
COLGATE SWEEPS 28-0D
ITURY FRO0M BROWN',
Puutes Star for Bothi Teams; Pol-
lards Crack Negro Player,
Smotihered-
Providlenct," R. L, No~v. 30.-Colgate
overwhelmied the much heralded-
Broom eleven here today, 28 -to 0.
Bro~wn was powerless against the
sjhifty drivinig attack of Colgate which
swept dow the field "despite -ankle
deep mud and a steady downpour of
rain. At ev~er4y departmen't of the
game the brilliant Hadmilton -eleven
outplayed ' Bro'&i1
Pollard,- the dusky Brown star,
failed to shine and was 'smothered-
ev~ery~ time he took the ball. The fist
Colgate touchdown c-amie within five
m~inutes after: the whistle blew~ starting
the game, and from then on Colgate
persistently threatened the Brown
goal. ~ Aderson, Spencer,'WWst; -and
Hubbell, who did the punting for Col-
gatestarred f~or the, winnetrswhile
Hillhouse's punting was -the -one re-
deeming feature of Brown's playing.
FOUR tDAYS IUNTL
M1ICHIGANENSIAN ITBSCRIPTJ)N
CA-11ArN. SATE 50 CE.NTS
Any Arbo9r's progressive merchants
use the. Michigan Daily, as their adver-
#singI, medn. -

T"HOU, G T
We will -give five
pounds .of

Try a Michigan Daily Want Ad
5 lbs.Cand

J0ra

For' the best

I: of six linesora ver!

in parody on

Poe'sRaven
Recommending

3 lbs.

for second best.
(Post by m~ail seal

envelope.

CLOSING DAT1

DEC. 7

±Committe. from

det

Public;

will give the

sion.

1 _ .

SPECIAL

ASS EMB:LY

GET BUSY

AT AKMORY
Big Music

Saturday Night

Same Price, 75c

BUYR.

"IKE" FISHER AND HIS SEVEN BEST MEN
Here TheyAre " :: Fser"rd Kn-"e" lrih-"uryDai

CAMiPAEGN. SAVE 50 CENTS ' 5E L
U U I

BE

THANKFUL

We have too many ready-made O'coats in stock and
reason we have placed our entire ready-made stock on
one week at the following reduced prices.

for that
Sale for

4

$ 22.oG reduced to $ 19.100
$20.0o reduced to $17.00
$18o reduced to $15.00

1_
- '
Y..'y
'. t'::.,. .
' ..
{If /J
4 1 f\
. I T
°T
u l
I'Ili I
., ,

i
4
i ' ,I
II I;'J
i j l j1!I !

. 1: "{ 6
:i "x"1 r1.
Li '/'
1'
... II ^

4

and several odd sizes at $12.00 while they last. We will re-

serve a coat for you on payment of $ 5.00. These gars
made in the new pinch balks and narrow shoulders,
field full of style, and the tailoriag is equal to any i
wear coat up to $25.00.

ments are
chester-
ready-to-

p,

J. K. Malcolm
604 E. LIBERTY ST.

y1

LIBERTY

THE MALCOLM

THE

rip-

1.,

Friends

r.

.4

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan