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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 01, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHI

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Treat Yourself To A
Nel Suit
or overcoat for Xmas. Come in to-
day and select te cloth from our as-
tortment of elegant and exclusive fabrics
from the very best mills. The cost
will not be unreasonable. And our
reputation is a guarantee that the
style and tailoring will be irreproach-
able.
G.L. Wild Company
Leading .Merchant Tailor State S

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You will

always get a

PER ECT SHAVE
if you use one of our guaranteed
Old Style Razors
L.,SWITZER Co
State St. Hardware
J'ust Received'
Sshipment of
LAVNDRY CASES
* Slator Book Shop :-

ANDAIL
Official newspaper at the University of
Mrugan. Published every morning except
M nday during the university year.
Entered at thepost-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
0 SM As Arbwr P ow Building. Sub-
oriptions: by carrier, $2.$0; by mail, $3.00.
Want ad. stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of tke
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at :30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
Lee F. Joslyn...... ......... City 'Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Verne F. Burnett..........Associate Editor
Golda Ginsburg............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade........Statistical Editor
Marian Wilson ............. Literary Editor
J. Campbell....Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Emery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horne.. Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau...Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter... Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
. I,. Stadeker E. L. Zeigler
C. M. Jickling H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney L. W. Nieter
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumgarth
Reporters
WV. A. Atlas Allen Shoenfield
H. C.Carrison C. L. Roeser
C. W. Neumann T. F. McAllister
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood
R. H. Fricken G. O. Brophy
B. 1. Millar F. A. Taber
). II. Cruttenden M. C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
A. L. Wood
Business Staff
Bernard Wol 3. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Win. M. LeFevre
Don M. Lillie Seymour B. Wilson
Jackson W. Smart
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1916. r
Night Editor-H. C. Garrison
GROUP DISCUSSION.
Several men may be sitting in a
room, blue with smoke. With feet on
the table, they often sit late into the
night-just talking. Such talks start
with gossip and either degenerate into
questionable stories or develop into
serious, discussions of real problems.
It is out of this latter sort of discus-
sion that the greatest and inmost
spirit of the American university life
breathes.m
In a group of several men, just one
of them can turn the tide from ordi-

PRESENT UNION PLANS
RESEMBLETHOSE OF '07
Dean H. 3. Bates, Prof. J. F. Bursley,
Homer Heath, Planned Build-
ing Nine Years Ago
Nine years ago a committee compos-
ed of Dean Henry M. Bates, Prof. J. F.
Bursley, and Homer Heath drew up
plans for a Union building adapted
particularily to the needs of the Un-
iversity of Michigan. The other day,
Mr. Heath received the original of
these specifications from Pond and
Pond, architects of Chicago, who drew
up the actual plans for he Union
building. "t is surprising, said Mr.
Heath yesterday, "how similar those
old plans are to the ones we are using
now. With the exception of arrange-
ment, they are practically identical.
The committee studied the project
from every conceivable angle, and the
final result was a building as perfect
as could possibly be made."
"Many people look aghast at the
million dollar project. They think we
are going to build a gilded palace of
some sort. But this conception is en-
tirely erroneous. The new Michigan
Union will not be a place that will
cause any man to be ashamed of his
own home. The place has been es-
pecially designed to convey the atmo-
sphere of home. Comfort is the up-
permost thought in the minds of the
building committee.
"We are going to give Michigan men
a place where they can do anything
they desire, and the costs of doing
these things are not going to be so
high as to cause any man, in whatever
straitened circumstances he may be,
to forego them. Our endowment fund
is for this very purpose. The dining
rooms, billiard and bowling facilities,
the dance and banquet halls, the mon-
ster plunge, the rooms for alumni and
visitors-all these will be at the dis-
posal of Michigan men as cheaply as
is possible to make them.
"The foundation work is well under
way. By April 1 the concrete nder
structure will be finished. Immediate-
ly afterward, the shell of the building
will be begun, and we expect to have
all the rough work done by next fall.
The walls, floors, doorways, and win-
dows and the roof will be completed
by that time. About Dec. 1 of next
year the interior work will be begun,
and we have no doubt that by April 1.
1918, Michigan will have completed
the finest building of its kind in the
world.

GO AND SEE

DAIE

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Time's Flying-
- Order Them NOW-
PERSONAL GREETING CARDS
The samples this year are much more artistic
than usual-Ask to see them-Leave your
order with us for CHRISTMAS ENCRAVIIC.
Man Stat,
- -
UNIVERSITY 0 TO EM
: 1111111 1111111111111 J I lllllll lll hllll l llii J Raei0 i rI Ii 1I111111111111 iI

ABOUT YOUR

MICHIGA NENSIAN

.---..

qmmmwxmmm

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PHOTO S.

kll n'ew shoes are stitched with Goodyear Welt machines
We use same machines for repair work. We believe we
have the most modern equipped shoe repair shop in Ann
Arbor. You'll get high class work and courteous treatment
it this shop and we think you'll find us worthy of patron-
ige. Our call and deliver service is at your disposal. Use it.
Famous Shoe Repairig Co.
PHONE 807 301 S. State St.

WE GRIND EYE GLASS
L E NS ES
IN OUR OWN SHOP

HALLER & FULLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS

ANNOUNCEMENT

SAM BURCHFIELD

& CO.

Gives you the best Tailoring service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

BUY
NYAL HUSKIES
for throat and
PAPER VESTS
for warmth
at
game
QJUARRY DRUG CO'S.
Prescription Store
Cor. State & N. University

k

Winter Wear
FOR MEN
Varsity Toggery Shop
1 107 So. Univ.

106 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO

E

12 -2 Special Tea and Rice Served
-PLAIN
OP SUI- Y 25c
.y Special 12-5 - - 6oc
en meal with soup, celery, olives,1
bread and hot roast pie, Oolong
ffee and milk.

Alarm Clocks
3q, ~ER s(0 RI 13. $1.00 up
tiSFountain Pens-
Waterman and Conkin
U. of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried
WAR HOLDING UP COMPLETION
OF AERODYNAMICS LABORATORY

,an Inn 611
Telephone 948-R

E. Liberty

W~omen

I

its written and presented by
inae will feature the Women's
ae party this afternoon in Bar-
gymnasium.
ecutive board of the Independent
club will hold an important
ing Saturday morning at 9 o'clock
rbour gymnasium to plan for the
r in honor of new members.
'Is expecting to stay here during
ion and wishing work should
ter at Dean Jordan's office.
est tickets for the Freshman
,d may be secured at Dean Jor-
office for 50 cents. No spectator
s will be sold.
>se wishing theses typed should
hone to Dean Jordan's office.
doing this work have registered

The European war has temporarily
held up perfection of the plans for
an aerodynamics laboratory at the
University of Washington. An aero-
dynamics balance, which is the cen-
tral instrument in the study, can not
be purchased because the manufac-
turing firm supplying the balances has
refurnished their plant to manufacture
war munitions.
A study of the theory of aeronautics
was made possible at the university
through W. E. Boeing, a Seattle cap-
italist and aeroplane enthusiast, who
gave the school an endowment to be
used in building a laboratory.
Congress recently appropriated
$11,000.000 for the construction and
maintenance of flying stations for the
aviation .branch of the army. Prof.
Eastweed of the engineering college
believes that if one of these were
placed near the university the twof
branches might co-operate and bene-
fits would be derived from the consoli- .
dation.{

nary piffle, and keep the tone of th
conversation high. By developingi
discussion into something valuable
the best in student life is often ex
pressed. From the ordinary studen
rocker in the top story of a roomin
house may be' expressed in college
slang, truths which are as great a
any which were exhaled from th
Greek oracles. Students thus decid
to their own satisfaction some of th
fundamental questions which other
wise they might never have figure
out. A wealth and variety of experi.
ences, and a healthy difference of opin
ion, all of these do much to sweel
away the trivialities and bashfulness
of college life, and in the quiet famil.
iarity of the small group, allow the
real things to shine forth. In thlF
light, ideas can be stimulated, and
destinies shaped.
The problem is nearly as old as
man, and it will last as long as man
endures. It needs always to be re-
garded. To develop the group discus-
sion means the cultivation of truer
friendships and more real education.
WINTER WALKING.
Winter weather diminishes greatly
the time spent in the open air by those
who ride in automobiles. It comes
near putting bicycles out of use. From
steamboats to canoes, there is almost
entire cessation of water outings.
All of which means that more walk-
ing instead of less ought to be done in
cold weather. There is no other way
of moving about in the open air which
keeps a healthy human being's feet so
warm and brings such a glow of
warmth from the body itself. If the
pedestrian is properly clad, especially
in respect to keeping dryshod, all of
the effects of winter walking should
be beneficial.
With a little care and discretionl
such exercise can be made as agree-
able as it is wholesome. Usually there
is no dust. Often the temperature is
neither too low for comfort nor too
high for vigorous exercise without
weariness or lassitude.
Rightly timed and kept within
bounds, winter walking is a good pre-
caution against the ill effects of
sedentary life and too much indoor
air.-The Cleveland Leader.

Each Person in Chicago Test Exists
on 332-3 Cents Food Daily
Chicago, Nov. 30.-The diet squad
undergoing a two weeks' test to helpl
establish an economical standard of
living and to prove that palatable and
nutritious meals can be served at a
cost not to exceed 40 cents a day, has
been fed for a week at a net cost for
food consumed of 33 2-3 cents a per-
son each day. On this diet the squad
has gained a total of 27 pounds.
The first week of the test was fin-
ished tonight. A statement of food
consumed, purchased at random at re-
tail stores in the downtown district,
shows that the total cost for food for
12 persons was $28,08. Of this $2.13
war for fruit, mostly fresh apples,
'range3 and dried fruits.
Vegetables cost $4.10, the chief item
being a peck of potatoes at 59 cents.
Staples, including flour, molasses,
tea, coffee and breakfast cereals, cost
$7.72, of which $1.55 was for 20 pounds
of sugar and $1.35 forone-eighth of
a barrel of flour. Three pounds of
coffee cost 81 cents. Butter, eggs and
,heese cost $4.52. Fish added $1.07.
The most expensive article of diet
was the meat, of which $10.08 was
purchased. Twenty-four loaves of
bread cost $2.40 and 35 quarts of milk
brought the expenses up to $3.15. '
There are $6.89 worth of supplies
on hand, making the actual cost of
1ood consumed $28.28.
T. W. U. A. THANKSGIVING PARTY 3
BRINGS REAL HOLIDAY SPIRITf

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON'
GIVEN VALUABLE COLLECTION
Seattle, Wash., Nov. 30.-Two valu-
able collections, one a set of Indian
relics, the other a group of historical-
ly- interesting ores, were recently giv-
en to the University of Washington
museum.
The Indian collection was obtained
by Curator Frank S. Hall from the
Swinomish tribe, whose home has
been on Fidalgo island, near La Con-
ner, as far back as is known by the
tribe. In this collection is an Indian
basket, which was handed down
through the generations of one family
for 100 years.
The ore specimens were presented
by Mrs. E. W. P. Guye, a pioneer of
Washington and a noted mineralogist.
The minerals are particularly valu-
able, for they are the first specimens
ever collected in Snoqualmie Pass
county.
NORWAY ADMITS SHE'CANNOT
RESTRICT GERMAN SUB-BOATS

MOVING PICTURE DRAMA TO
All) IN TUBERCULOSIS FIGHTI

DIET SQUAD LIVES

CHEAPLY

MODERN BARBER SHOP
332 Slate St.

'

A Particular Place
for Particular People.

FRANK C, BOLICH, Prop.

:ONSTR A TION FOR CONTROL
OF TUBEICULOSIS PLANNED
amingharm, Mass., Nov. 30.-The
anal Association for the Study
Prevention of Tuberculosis will
aence a three year health demon-
ion in an effort to produce the
"spotless town" in the United
s. The association will seek to
that tuberculosis can be con-
d as well as other infectious dis-
, if the right methods are em-
d. The fund for conducting the
nstration has been donated to
irganization by the Metropolitan
Insurance company.
:h grade Kodak Finishing at Bug-

New York, Nov. 30.-The National
Association for the Study and Preven-
tion of Tuberculosis is making one of
the most extended campaigns this
year ever attempted by the organiza-
tinon. The latest plan to aid the fight
against consumption is the release of
a moving picture drama, "The Great
Truth." The picture aims to show the
people that tuberculosis is not inher-
ited and that it is curable. The film
will be circulated through a number
of state and local associations affiliat-
ed with the society, and will be shown
in theaters, churches, schools, and

Making up in friendliness and en-
nusias~m what they lacked in num-
brs, 4) university women enjoyed the
Thanksgiving party given by the Y.
W. C. A. yesterday afternoon at New-
lierry hall. Some danced, some played
games, and others sat about chatting
infor;inally. A real holiday atmos-
p' re was evident throughout. "A
peach of a time" was how one of the
girls characterized it. The party was
such a complete success that it will
probably become an annual event.
The Michigan Daily for service.
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
use the Michigan Daily as their adver-
U asug medium.

C
t
t
1i

London, Nov. 30.-An Amsterdam
dispatch to the Exchange Telegraph
company quotes the Berlin Lokal
Anzeiger, in commenting on the re-
port that the Norwegian govern-
ment has conceded that its sub-marine
restrictions cannot be maintained, as
follows:
"It may be supposed that a final
agreement will soon be reached- but,
in addition to the- submarine ques-
tion, there also is the economical ques-
tion and the position of Norway as an
independent to be considered."
Spotlight Vaudeville Complete Success
According to UnioAh officials, the
"spotlight vaudeville" given in Hill
auditorium Tuesday night, was a suc-
cess from every point of view. The
show itself was well received by the
audience, and in addition to the large
ticket sale, - practically every Union
nember attended the performance.
FOUR DAYS UNTIL
WICHIGANENSIAN SUBSCRIPTION
CAMPAIGN. SAVE 50 CENTS

U Takes Pictures
Develops Films
makes Prints
and Enlarge-
mnentIs,
713 E. VNIVERSITY
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Anr Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:zo a
n. and hourly to 7-:-10 p. in., 9 : xo p. in.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-.8:48 a. in. and
every two hours to 6: p. m. . ; to Lansing,
8:4 p. im.
Jackson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. ni. and every two hours
to 7:48 P. m.
Local Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. in , 6:40 a.
gn., 7:05 a. m. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
in., 8:05 p. i., 9:05 p. m., 10:50 p. n. to
Ypsilanti only. 9,:2o a. tn., 9:50 a. m., r2:05 P
:a1., 6:05 p. mn., 11 :45 P. in., 1:1o a. in., 1: :c
a. in. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound.-6: 5 a. m., 7:50 a.
mn., to0:20 P. in.. 12:20 a. ni-
We Offer You
SECURITY- - SERVICE - -LOCATION
Resources $3,800,000
Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office--
Northwest corner Main and Huron
Branch Office- -
707 North University Ave.
The Farmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY - - - EFFICIENCY
Convenient and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
Be Pleased With Our Service. Two offices
101-105 S. Main St. 330 S. State St.
TYPEiWRITERS of all makes
Sale or Rents Cleaning &
Repairing. TYPEWRITING &
MIMEOGRAPHING, SUPPLIES
322 S. State 582-J

I

c
i

elsewnzhere.

A bit of a compliment to the folk at FOUR DAYS UNTIL
home, were a giftie of somthing niftie MICHIGANENSIAN SUBSCRIPTION
from the James Foster House of Art. tf CAMPAIGN. SAVE 50 CENTS

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