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November 10, 1916 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

We are ready to show you the
Best Line of Men's

Suits,

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Furnishings

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SI S C IM
ADVANCE VE U 1 312
National Secretary Sees Increase of
400,000 Votes Over Last
Election

WADHAMS & CO.
MAIN ST.

State St. Store
Nickels Arcade

Your Floral Needs--
Are BEST SATISFIED By Us
PHONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION
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1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.

This Store aims to Serve it's

PATRONS WELL=,
To give the best value possible
for the lowest price possible is the best service any store can
render.

Women's and Children's Apparel

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Main and Liberty Sts.

I

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
System

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law ook Co

27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

U

enemma

CHOP off a few
minutes and eat some of
GEORGE'S AMW EY n
WAX KINGP 1OE
314 S, State Si, Phone 124 4-M

1N TERCOLLEGIATES

MARLEY 2fr3 IN.
DEVON 2f IN.
ARROW
Ct0OLLAR S
i ots. each, 6 for 90 cis.
CLUETT. PEABODY & CO., INC. MAKERS
Cornell: In order to check the social
abuses which have arisen of late
years, bringing down considerable
criticism on the university, steps
have been taken to stop the military
hop at 3 o'clock instead of 5 as in
former years. In addition to this no
liquors can be served at any of the
clubhouses during the festivities and
all parties will be formal with no
"cut-in" dances. If any of these
rules are disobeyed it will mean the
abolition of the military hop perm-
anently, say those in charge.
Purdue: A student in the university
has just computed that he has danced
1,893 miles in his social career.
Minnesota: A special campaigndhas
Just been started to put an end to
all "jumpers." A "jumper," accord-
ing to Minnesota students, is one
who takes unusual liberties in the
cafeteria at Shelven hall. Tilis
privilege is only granted to pro-
fessors.
Oregon: A plan to put a practical
course in ethics into the compulsory
course for freshmen is being con-
sidered by university authorities.

DE BS DEFEATED FOR CONGRESS
A 20 per cent increase over the vote
of four years ago, or approximately
1,300,000, as against 97,000 in 1912, is
claimed for the socialists in Tuesday's
election by Adolph Gerner, national
secretary of the socialist party. He
said:
"We are very well satisfied with the
vote of 1916. We figure we have gain-
ed a comfortable increase over the
vote in 1912 and would have been given
at least 2,000,000 had it not been for
the bitter opposition of organized lab-
or, which took many votes to the Dem-
ocrats.
"Some high hopes were shattered,
however, by the defeat of Eugene Debs
for congress in Terre Haute, Ind. We
did not think there was a chance for
Debs to lose. In the Chicago fight for
the Chicago state's attorney's office we
also miscalculated. The battle be-
tween State's Attorney Hoyne and the
Thompson administration we figured
would swing many democrats as well
as republicans to the support of Mr.
Cunnea. This did not work out, for
the democrats have certainly stood
handsomely behind Mr. Hoyne."
The uncertainty of the national elec-
tion puts the counting of smaller re-
sults, among which are the socialist
winners, in the background. Returns
are therefore being received very slow-
ly at the socialist national headquat-
ers.
Following are offices which are
claimed by the socialists and others
which they say are in doubt:
New York-London, Hillquist, Ship-
lakop and Whiteshorn to the legisla-
ture.
Vermont-James Lawson, first so-j
cialist ever elected in the state, to thea
legislature.-
California-George W. Downing and
two others to the legislature.<
Milwaukee - Berger for mayor,
doubtful; Zabel, state's attorney; two<
senators and five to seven members oft
the house in the legislature.
Oklahoma-Gain in votes indicatesE
state and national vote of 90,000. Con-
stitutional amendments carried by of-f
ficial count by 3 to 1. Winterburg for
state senator, doubtful. One hundrede
township officers elected.t
HARVARD THEOLOGICAL REVIEWr
TO INAUGURATE NEW SERIESc
Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 9.---The Unit-
ed States has become the clearingc
house for the fruits of scholarly re-t
search since the war has made it im-e
possible for the foreign countries tot
publish educational journals and Har-a
vard has reaped especial benefit from1
this state of affairs for there is to ap-s
pear a new series called the "Harvards
Theological Studiqs," printed as an
extra number of the Harvard Theo-c
logical review. The chances seem goodl
for this country to act not merely ast
temporary receivers for the productss
of European culture, but to assume a1
position that will be permanent in the
field of world learning.
PITY THE POOR DAILY SCRIBE;
HE HAS TO WORK NEXT DOORI
Are school of music students noisy?
What do you think of these recently
compiled statistics?
In ordinary piano practice a studentn
strikes the keyboard 750 times a min-o
ute or 45,000 notes in an hour. Int
practicing four hours a day he strikess
180,000 notes. There are about 200f
taking piano lessons and all togetherp
they strike 36,000,000 notes a day in

pursuit of the perfect technique. Thea
average note on the piano can be1
heard for 100 yards, and all piano stu-t
dents make enough noise each day to t
be heard 21,783 miles.p
Prof. Rankin Lectures in Kansas
Prof. T. E. Rankin, of the rhetoricf
department, left Thursday for Topeka,o
Kansas, where he will deliver a lec-o
ture before the State Teachers' asso- t
ciation. b

I LECTION PAALEL
KAYES -TI LOEN RAC
176 Struggle Ended in Deadlock; De
cided in House of Rep-
resentatives
Demands for recounts are anticipat-
ed following the returns from 13 states
where either Hughes or Wilson were
winners by a bare majority. Cali-
fornia, Minnesota, New Mexico, Ore-
gon, Delaware, Idaho, Kansas, Wash-
ington, North Dakota, West Virginia
and Wyoming all returned close
counts, and the race is the closest
since the historic Hayes-Tilden con-
troversy of 1876.
Tilden and Hendricks, the democrat-
ic candidates for president and vice-
president, received 184 uncontested
votes, one less than a majority of the
electorial college. Hayes and Wheeler,
republican candidates, received 165
uncontested votes and 20 votes were in
doubt.
In South Carolina the republicans
received an apparent substantial ma-
jority, but the democrats charged gross
fraud in the handling of the election.
In Florida and Louisiana the demo-
crats seemingly won the victory, but
republican election officials, alleging
intimidation of Negro voters and other
Irregularities, threw out enough votes
to gain the election.
The democrats contested one elec-
toral vote in Oregon on the ground that
an elector was a postmaster at the
time of his election, although not at
the time he sat in the electoral col-
lege.
Senator Zachariah Chandler, of
Michigan, as chairman of the nation-
al committee, was the leader in the bit-
ter battle which the republicans wag-
ed to turn all of these contest their
way and thus wil the election. Rival
election boards in each of the contest-
ed states returned a list of electorals
and the contest was as to which return
should be recognized.
With the situation in deadlock a
joint committe of the house and sen-
ate finally reported a bill creating a
special commission of five senators,
five representatives and five justices
of the supreme court to determine the
issue. Three republican and two dem-
ocratic senators, three demo'ratis and
two republican representatives were
selected. Two republican and two
democratic justices were agreed upon
and the four empowered to select the
fifteenth member of the commission.
Justice Joseph P. Bradley was chos-
en and his vote (the committee split-
ting eight to seven) seated republican
electors in all cases of contest and
made Rutherford B. Hayes president
of the United States.
The law of 1887 was the direct re-
sult of ten years of bitter agitation
of the question as to the justice of
the Hayes decision and it was design-
ed to prevent similar contests in fu-
ture. In effect it requires the acept-
ance by congress of the electral vote,
where a tribunal is empowered by
state law to finally determine the re-
sult.
In case of dispute between officials
of the same state, both claiming to
be legally empowered to make the re-
turn, it provided that only such votes
shall be counted as are agreed on
by vote of both houses of congress.
iVIATION SECTION ADDED O
UNIVERSITY NAVAL DIVISIONS
Reserves to Operate Curtis Hydro.
Aeroplane at Detroit; 24

Men in Corps
Word has been received from the
navy department that among the units
of the naval reserve division which is
to be formed here, will be an aviation
section. There will be 24 men chosen
from the engineer's corps for this pur-
pose.
During the spring a Curtiss hydro-
aeroplane is to be attached to the
naval reserve ship Don Juan de Aus-
tria at Detroit. The local squad will
take frequent trips to Detroit for the
purpose of taking part in drills with
this machine.
A meeting of those members of the
faculty interested in the organization
of the naval reserves is to take place
on Saturday morning at 9 o'clock in
the lecture room of the economics
building.

New Fall Neckwear, Hats
and Vnderwear

COUSESIN FLYING I VEN
BY FOUR UNIVERSITIES

l
. w
1

I

Yale: Yale has started a novelty In
the form of baseball practice in the
fall, 50 candidates having turned out
to get into shape for the spring
work. The coaches believe that the
rough edges can be worked off this
fall and in this way they will be
able to pay more attention to in-
dividual faults during the spring
practice.
Stanford: One hundred undergrad-
uates have already signed up for six
months or more of work in France
under the American ambulance
corps. The proposition is being fi-
nanced by a group of wealthy San
Franciscans.

II DON'T

II

Michigan Department Offers Twenty-
two Hours of Work in
New Science
Within the last few years the science
of aeronautics has developed so rapid-
ly that only a small number, four to
be exact, of American universities
have included courses in this subject
in their curriculum. Massachusetts
Institute of Technology and Michigan
were the pioneers in establishing
courses in this branch of engineering.
The Boston school first gave work
in aeronautics in 1913. The local en-
gineering college has been giving a
complete four year course since 1915.
Pennsylvania and Illinois are the lat-
est schools to enter the field, both giv-
ing a small amount of elective work
to seniors.
The aeronautic department of the
engineering college is constantly ex-
panding, and beginning with the next
semester it will have a well equipped
laboratory at its disposal. A wind tun-
nel with which to test the effects vari-
ous shaped wing sections and propell-
ers and their resistance to the air will
be constructed. Another machine will
test the strength of struts and other
wood used in the building of an aero-
plane. Apparatus for testing wire and
cables will also be provided.
In conjunction with the aeronautical
laboratory the naval tank can be used
for experimenting with pontoons for
hydro-aeroplanes, and the automobile
laboratory can be used for investigat-
ing motors. With this splendid
equipment, the college will undoubt-
edly become a center of aeronautical
research work.
At present work in aviation amount-
ing to 22 hours of credit is given in
the 14 courses of the department. The
faculty are Profs. H. C. Sadler and F.
Pawlowski and Mr. J. M. Munson.
Professor Pawlowski is considered an
authority in aviation circles, his ad-
vice having been sought by the Army
and Navy departments on several oc-
casions.
Brazilian Gold Discovery Rumored
-Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Nov. 9.-De-
finite accounts are still lacking here
concerning the extent of the gold dis-
coveries reported on the Baracatu riv-
er, in the municipality of Entre Rios,
state of Minas Geraes. The news from
Bello Horizonte, capital of Minas
Geraes, was to the effect that the
river was discovered by accident to
be washing out gold. It was asserted
that a rich bed had been found under
the stream.
Beakes Carries District by 157 Votes
Congressman Samuel W. Beakes, of
Ann Arbor, seems practically assured
of re-election as representative from
the second district. Nearly complete
returns show a vote of. 26,728 for
Beakes, and26,571 for Mark R. Bacon,
of Wyandotte. Wednesday, Bacon
seemed sure of victory. Beakes is a
Democrat.
Cow Detective Finds Lost Necklace
Temple, Tex., Nov. 9.-Little Ida
May Hunt lost a gold chain and lav-
alliere in the river near her home sev-
eral weeks ago. Her father started to
milk the family cow recently and dis-
covered the ornament twisted around
the .cow's leg. The cow had picked it
up in wading the river.
Some dance! That spot light ball
at the Packard, S'aturday night. And
"Ike's" orchestra, too! 9-10-11 1

At The

J .F. WUERTH CO.
New Day Light Store next to Orpheum

J

$35.00

Sheep Lined Coat
And
Patricks Mackinaw

It is made of the Finest Black
Unfinished Worsted. It is silk
lined, silk sewed and hand
stitched throughout.
It is tailored with Distinguish-
ed Grace, as the picture shows.
Come in and try it on. We are
quite puffed up over this value.
It is getting us talked about
among young men who know
"what's what" and where to
get it,
Making a specialty of Even-
ing Clothes we are in a position
to assure you getting the right
Haberdashery when you select
from our showing.

WE DO

VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP
1107 So. Univ.

TYPEWRITING
MULTIGRAPHING
MIMEOGRAPHING
Typewriters for sale or rent.
Hamilton Business College

To Get Your

FORGET

Jtandard 9u/llr,j.
Brandegee- Kieidn Clothes
WE SELL A
"Heaping-Value
Dress Suit at

V

LOST
LOST--Slide Rule in leather case with
name on flap. Also I,. C. S. pamph-
let and E. E. II mimeographed notes.
Lost Fri. or Sat. Nov. 3 or 4. Find-
er please call Fishleigh, 960 or 566.
Reward. 10-11-12
LOST-Gold cuff link, initialed "J. P.
C." Reward. Call 2220. 7,8
WANTED
WANTED-Students wanted as book-
keepers in Ann Arbor Savings Bank,
forenoons or afternoons, either of-
fice. Apply in writing. 10-11
WANTED-If you are in need of any-
thing, The Michigan Daily can help
you get it through its Classified De-
partment.

IMISCELLAINEOUS

TYPEWRITERS of all makes
bought, sold, rented or ex-
changed. Expert repairing,
factory service. Sole agent Under.
wood & Corona. TYPEWRITING,
MIMEOGRAPHING & SUPPLIES.
0. D. IORRILL, 822 S. State St.
(Oyer Baltimore Lunch). 582-J.
SUMMER WORK-You will find many
good propositions on the campus for
summer; before you decide, see the
Barnum Company's, 721 N. Univer-
sity, Dr. Ritter's office, F. E. Ritzen-
heim. 7.8,9,10,11,12
FOUND

Tinker Company
Cor. State and William St.
CLOTHES, FURNISHINGS
and HATS
Rise in Price of Cigars Predicted
St. Paul, Minn., Nov. 9.-Six cent
cigars are almost a certainty in the
very near future, the St. Paul retail
cigar dealers association today pre-
dicted. High prices of all other com-
modities was assigned.
Northwest Fears Coal Shortage
Duluth, Minn., Nov. .9.-Coal men
here today abandoned all hope that the
present reserve of coal would supply
the Northwest's demand for the com-
ing winter. Duluth and Superior furn-
ish nearly all the Northwest's coal.
Their admission of their inability to
get sufficient coal while navigation
was open is fair evidence that there
will be a coal shortage this winter
when thermometers register around
50 below zero.
Illinois:-Students polled a very
heavy vote during the recent election.
Hughes led in all university precincts.
Have those rooms decorated now.
C. H. Major & Co. Phone 237. 5-16

November Victor Records

Are On Sale Today!

Phone us your order for Approval!
Try them out in your home.

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Mals 83t.
PHONI 1707

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