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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 10, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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I

T H p A PEFRS SAY
VING TO THE SCARCITY OF DYES AND THE EM-
RGO ON WOOL, THERE IS GOING TO BE A SHORT-
AGE OF GOOD WOOLENS FOR MEN'S CLOTHES.
This is true, BUT our showing for Fall and Winter
does not evidence it. We have the best assortment of
all wool fabrics for men's Suits and Overcoats that we
have ever displayed-and at prices within reach of all.
Our $25.00 line will be a pleasant surprise to you.
What is even more vital to you is, that in this entire
line of over five hundred weaves there is nothing but
all-wool fabrics. These, when hand tailored to your
individual measure, will give you zoo cents value for
every dollar expended.

l11 L"YN DO

719 N. Uiversity

THE ONE PHOTOGRAPHER
Who delivers the Goods and has
been delivering them for 12 years
right here among Michigan Students

Just

Rece

Kodaksa
and
Supplies

Oxuaranteed
Amateur
Findshig

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1 1

TEUTONS TO STRIVE FOR
INTERNATIONAL PEACE
Chancellor Bethmann-Hollweg De-
After War

Mat.
Wed. 4& Sat.

GAR RICK
DETROIT

Week of
Nov. 6

A New Supply
of Laundry BOX .es

"A KING OF NOWHERE"

i

J. K. MALCOLM

E. Liberty St.

Malcolm Block

Phone 1713-M

._

I

SENIORS
Sit -early for your "jMiclilganensian"

Picture at

MAIN STUDIOS
1546-48 Broadway

New York,

- N. Y.

:".mow
t

Also at

Ithaca, N. Y.

619 E. Liberty St.

Ann Arbor,

ich.

West Point, N. Y.
-Princeton, N. J.
No rthampton, Mass.
Hanover, N. H.

Perfect Portraitures=
Uusurpassed accommodations for
group photographs

Lafayette, Ind.

{

WHAT'S GOING ON
Today.
4 o'clock-Newberry Residence stunt
regular Women's league party, Bar-
mur bymnasium.
4:15 o'clock-Northey lecture in
aphitheater of chemistry building.
7 o'clock-Meeting of the upper
aff men of the Technic in the En-
neering society room.
7 o'clock-Dr. Warthin lectures on
rgiene, west amphitheater medic
Gillding.
30 o'clock-Meeting of Alpha Nu and
mtral Debate tryouts in Alpha Nu
oms.
8 o'clock-Hobart guild holds mem-
rship dance at Harris hall.
8 o'clock-Ernest Stanton lectures in
itural science nuilding auditorium.
8 o'clock-Thomas A. E. Weadock
dresses Catholic student smoker at
. Thomas hall.
Tomorrow.
2 o'clock -- All-Fresh-Heidelberg
ime, Ferry field.-
U-Notices.j
All band men must be at University!
il at 6:30 tonight. Bring baggage,
d if berths have not been received
ey may be secured at that time. All
nd men having money or tickets be-
nging to band bounce must turn
em in by tonight. Truck will be
i hand to carry baggage to station.
LAN 10,000-MILE AIR RACE
AROUND COUNTRY NEXT YEAR
San Diego, Cal., Nov. 9.-Plans for a
,000-mile national aeroplane race
ound the country next year, starting
d ending at the United States army
litary aerodrome here, have been an-
unced by Arnold Kruckman, former
rector of the Aero Club of America,
d an authority on aviation. Leading
ilitary, naval, and civilan aviators
ll be invited to compete, according
Kruckman, who expressed confi-
nce that the war and navy depart-
ents and the Aero Club of America
ould support the proposition.
Riese Collection (oes to IndianaI
The University of Indiana will haveI
e next opportunity of examining Dr.
L. Riese's collection of manuscripts,'
hich are on exhibition at the Library.
he collection will remain in Ann Ar-
r until Nov. 15.

-FIRE DOES $1,000 DAMAGE AT
RESIDENCE OF DR. H. WILSON
Duplicating a blaze which broke out
three months. ago, fire did a damage
estimated at $1,000 -to the residence
of Dr. Harold Wilson, Geddes Heights,
yesterday afternoon.
The fire broke out at 3 o'clock. Mrs.
Wilson had gone upstairs about 15
minutes previous and did not notice
anything amiss. When she returned
a few minutes later the fire had gained
considerable headway.o
The water pressure in this part of
the city is only about 15 pounds, but
this difficulty was overcome by the
high pressure pumps of the motor
truck. Chief Andrews was at a loss
to account for the cause of this and
the previous fire. Defective wiring is
suspected.
The firemen were hampered in their
work by an autoist drivingthis machine
between them and the hydrants. Po-
lice say that arrests will follow. Dr.
Wilson maintains his practice in De-
troit.
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS LEAVES
TO ATTEND MEETINGS IN EAST
President Harry B. Hutchins left
Ann Arbor yesterday for Worcester,
Mass., where he will attend a meet-
ing of the Association of American
Universities today and Saturday. Dean
A. H. Lloyd, of the Graduate School,
accompanied the president.
From Worcester the president will
leave for Washington, D. C., where on
Monday and Tuesday next he will at-
tend the annual meeting of the Na-
tional Association of State Universities.
President Hutchins will leave Wash-
ington for New York City, where he
will arrive Wednesday. While in the
metropolis he will meet with the ad-
visory committee on summer military
training camps, of which he is a mem-
ber. The committee is composed of
heads of a number of prominent uni-
versities and colleges. President
Drinker, of Lehigh Iniversity,swill
tender the members of the committee
a luncheon in New York.
If your window shades need renew-
ing call 237, C. H-. Major & Co. 5-16
F. S. Jacobus' Five-Piece Orchestra
for dances, entertainments and con-
certs. 520 N. Fifth Ave. Phone 1487.

Berlin, Nov. 9.-Germany will throw I
all her influence into the organiza-
tion, after the war, of an international
league to preserve peace, Chancellor
von Bethmann-Hollweg announced to-
day in a speech in the reichstag. The
chancellor replied to a recent inter-
view of Lord Grey with foreign news-
paper men, in which Grey declared
the original of the present war must
influence peace conditions and that
Germany would be entitled to ask for
guarantee against future attacks as
the present war were really forced
upon her.
"The action which made the war in-
evitable was the Russian mobilization,:
during the night of July 30 and 31,"
said the chancellor. "Russia, England,
France and the whole world knew this'
step made it impossible for us to wait
any longer."
FIRST WARTHIN TALK TONIGHT
Freshman Lecture on Sexual Hygiene
Given in Medical Building
Dr. A. S. Warthin will deliver the
first of his lectures at 7 o'clock this
evening to freshmen on sexualihygiene,
in the west amphitheater of the med-
ical building. Some of the 400 tickets
to be issued for tonight's lecture are
still to be had at the "Y" office and
it is hoped that these will be taken
at once.
As these talks are for freshmen
only, and it is in many cases difficult
to distinguish the first year men from
the rest of the students, freshmen are
requested to wear their fresh head-
gear when applying for a ticket. Each
student can secure only one ticket.
DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE
RETAINS OFFICE FOLLOWING
STIRRING ELECTION RACE
(Continued from Page One.)
war. Only England's back-down in
the first instance, and Germany's in the
second, has maintained peace. The
election has proved that no other
American statesman will ever again
dare to alienate the hyphen votes."
The Morgen Post, after qualifying
bulletins regarding the election fol-
lowing Reuter's first flat announce-
ment of ex-Governor Hughes' election,
said: "The dispatch saying the elec-
tion remains in doubt is not true, be-
cause Washington has already officially
notified Secretary Grew of the Ameri-
can embassy that ex-Governor. Hughes
is elected.
"In view of Hughes' reported en-
dorsement of Colonel Roosevelt's state-
ment that America should have pro-
tested against German occupation of
Belgium, it is difficult to see how the
German government helped to elect
Hughes."
San Francisco, Nov. 9.-Completion
of the counts in a few Los Angles pre-
cincts and revision of figures in Son-
oma and Butte counties this after-
noon reduce Wilson's lead over Hughes
in the presidential race to 2,345 votes,
according to returns from 5,712 pre-
cincts. The totals for these precincts
were: Hughes, 457,127; Wilson, 459,472.
New York, Nov. 9.-A divided con-
gress was forecasted by incomplete re-
turns gathered by the United Press up
to noon today. These returns tended
to support Republican claims that the
house will be Republican, although

ARCADE
Shows at 3:00; 6:30; 8:00; 9:30
ioc Unless Otherwise Specified.
Phone 296-M.
Fri.-io-Lionel Barrynore in "The Brand
of cowardice" and Drew Comedy.
Sat.-ii-Robert Edeson in "Fathers of
Men"-cearlie chaplin in "The Pawn-
shop," 15c. Children's Matinee, 2p. m.
"Midnight ride of Paul Revere",
"Buster and His Goat", "A Night in
Dreamland", "Royal Gorge"
Mon.-13-William Gillette in "Sherlock
Hom e s" "(Ret.)
- - - - -

/,

Orpheum Theatre
Matinees, 2:00-3:30; Evening, 6:45,
8:r5, 9:30.
Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Friday io - Mae Murray in "The
Big Sister." Also Bray Cartoons.
Sat.-ir-Bessie Barriscale in"Hone "Also
Triangle Comedy, Fay Tincher in
"The French Milliner." live. 1rc.
Sun.-Mon.-12-ia-Louise Huff in "The
Reward of Patience." Also Holmes
Travels.
PHONE
1321 or 170-M
FOR FLOWERS
A full line of plant and
cut flower baskets
Goodhew Floral Co,
225 E. Liberty Darling Bldg.

I

1;

No Two of Us Alike

f

I

Some short, some tall; some large, some small-each
with a physical difference which requires individual
attention in making correctly fitted clothes.
Be Your Own Model
and have your clothes tailored to fit you-YOU alone.
We'll measure-Today.

C. W. GRAHAM, Mngr.

"

SEEH'

1 W-

I

FRED W. GROSS

count will show them still in control
of the lower body. That the present
Democratic majority of 21 will be
Democratic leaders insisted the final
deeply cut, however, is certain.
Returns on the senate fight are
nearer complete. They tend to show
the Democrats still in control, there
being a probable majority of 12. The
entire membership of the house was
voted on.
Estimates based on claims of state
committees of both sides show any-
where from 210 to 220 Democratic con-
gressmen elected, and from 218 to 210
Republicans chosen. One of the big
features of the congressional fight is
the seeming election of a woman for
the first time in the nation's history.
St. Paul, Nov. 9.-The St. Paul Daily
News printed an extra late today an-
nouncing the election of Wilson.
Boston, Nov. 9.-The Boston Travel-
Lr, which has been supporting Hughes,
announced Wilson's re-election this
afternoon, granting him 273 electoral
votes.
Indianapolis, Nov 9.-The Indian-
apolis News, strong Hughes supporter,
this afternoon stated incomplete and
unofficial returns from California, New
Hampshire and North Dakota indicated
the re-election of President Woodrow
Wilson.
San Francisco, Nov. 9.-In an extra
issued at 2:30 this afternoon, the San
Francisco Bulletin declared that Wil-
son had carried California and claimed
his re-election as president.
St. Paul, Nov. 9.-Corrections on
four big counties' figures from county
auditor's office put Hughes in lead by
646 in Minnesota. Totals now: Wilson,
170,634; Hughes, 171,270.
Los Angeles, Nov. 9.-A mechanical
defect in one of the adding machines
in Registrar McAleer's office resulted
in the loss of exactly 2,000 votes to
Hughes, in Los Angeles county returns,
according to McAleer this afternoon.
New York, Nov. 9.-The Evening
Mail which has supported Hughes,
late this afternoon issued an extra

309 S. Main

814 S. State

FINE TAILORING

declaring Wilson's re-election, and
giving him 269 votes.
New York, Nov. 9.-"I believe there
will be recounts in California; New
Mexico, North Dakota, and Minnesota,"
Republican National Chairman Wilcox
declared this afternoon following a
conference with Charles E. Hughes.
"We must safeguard our interests in
these states," Wilcox added.
Asked if he still believes Hughes had
been elected, Wilcox said he did. He
said he had not discussed the ques-
tion with Hughes, but that from the
latter's attitude he judged that the
candidate was still believing this. Wil-
cox said he did not contemplate mak-
ing any statement tonight and did not
plan to see Hughes again.
George W. Wickersham, who was
also present at the conference, had no
statement to make. Previously Everet
Colby had intimated several contests
were planned.
New York, Nov. 9.-At 4:50 Demo-
cratic Chairman McCormick announced
"We have got the thing sewed up.
President Wilson is re-elected with-
out a doubt."
FIGHTING MAIZE AND BLUE
SQUAD GETS BIG SEND-OFF
(Continued from Page One.)
team from the top of several empty
coal cars directly opposite the station.
At 10:58 the team entrained amid
the rousing cheers of the students and
the strains of "The Victors" played by
the band. The team will not go di-
rectly to Ithaca, but will go to Ge-
neva, N. Y., where they will arrive
early in the morning. Today they will
practice on the field of Hobart Col-
lege. Saturday morning the team will
leave for Ithaca.

lkiJJE STIC
3 - 7:30 - 9:30
Now Playing
"The Luck "Totm"
Mary & Jack
""All Wrong"
VON HAMPTON & SHRINER,
FOX & INGRAHAM,
ARTHUR FARRFIL,
"I"S THE ONE BEST BET."
JUBILEE 6 ACTS 6
BILL T
GET YOUR TICKETS FOR
THE MILKMAN'S MATINEE
SAT. NOV., 18. 10:30 A. M.
DR. NORTHEY, DETROIT EXPERT,
LECTURES ON BIOLOGY TODAY
"Biological Products" is the subject
of a lecture to be delivered'; by Dr.
Northey, associated with Parke, Davis
& Co., of Detroit, at 4:15 o'clodk this
afternoon in the amphitheater of the
chemistry building.
Dr. Northey has a nation-wide repu-
tation as an expert along biological
lines and has charge of the important
department of biological investigation
at Parke, Davis & Co. He will illus-
trate his lecture with lantern slides.
The lecture is given under the
auspices of the Prescott club of the
College of Pharmacy and is open to
the public.

r

Leave your film at the Delta. 24
hour service.

[d

High grade Kodak Finishing
en's.

at Sug-

FOX -

TROT

LIBERTY AT 606

BALL
ARMORY

FRIDAY NIGHT

AT

Golf

D. E. GRENNAN
Real
rs*OT .Tai1orin1
* Riding
LIBRITY AT 606 Breeches

KFTHAT SAME BIG MUSIC"
IKE FISCHER'S ORCHESTRA

DANCING 9 TO 1

TICKETS AT BUSY BEE

LIMITED TO 125 COUPLES

.

L13li./1 , ,. i .c i s v y w

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