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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 31, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

G. H. Wild Co.
Leading Merchant Tailors
State St.

GR-P

STU]

tlttlrtrllrtllill1lllrlllllnllulllllnllllll!!11%i
U-FANOLAS
FOR
DENT'S ROOMS
$ 12.5 0
WHY PAY MORE?
INGER MUSIC SHOP
122.E. Liberty St.
'i r11111i1111111t11111111111ItIll llIlI lI 1ll lll I111i llll III

Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan. Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier, $2.50; by mail, $3.00.
Want ad. stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed joo words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily if left at the office in the
Ann Arbor Press Bldg., or in the notice box
in the west corridor of the general library,
where the notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock
each evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn................City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Verne E. Burnett..........Associate Editor
Golda Ginsburg............. Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade t ... Statistical Editor
J. E. Campbell...Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Emery.. Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horne. .Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. -Rau....Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter... Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
L. S. Thompson a E. A. Baumgarth
L. W. Nieter J. L. Stadeker

a

"Y" Emp
ment Bux
HOURS:-
3 to 6 p. m. 1
9 to IS a. m.
Telephone 823

' { 1!1 1!1 11{ 111 l 11f8itll fl 11 11 11 11 1 11i lll i ti ll lli l itl{ 1 1 {l {!11111;,i
READ
The World for Sale, $1.35.
- Cilbert Parker.
Tish, $1.50.=
loy- -
Mary Roberts Rinehart.
reau :What Is Coming, $1.50.
II C. Wells.
Daily
sat.NB K
--r
NIVERSITYBOOKTORr
H111{{111111{llllllltlTliili~ lil11ifll~ llllltl~ llllt

ALLM END
one 1692

I. P. Note Books
Yo'.r Name in, Gold on Cover
Free of Charge
SSlater Book Shop T:-:

U

DETROITL NITED LINES
en Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
run on astern time, one hour faster
,al time.
it Limited and Express Cars-3:1o a.
hourly to 7: i0op.im., 9:10 p. mn.
iazoo Limited Cars--8 :4 a. m. ,and
No hours to 6:48 p. Il.; to Lansing,
Mn.
on Express Cars-(Local stops west of
bor)-9:48 a. m. and every two hours
p. ml.
Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m, 6:4o a.
; a, m. and every two hours to 7:05 P.
i p. n., 9:05 p. 11., 10:50 p. n. to
only. 9 :ao a. in., 9:50 a. in., 2:05 p.
5pn1,II:45 p. in., 1:1o a. in., I:20
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Cars. Westbound-6:o5 a. in., 7:50 a.
zo p. in.. 12:2o a. in.

.

We Offer You
SECURITY - - SERVICE - -LOCATION

Resources $3,8oo,ooo

Ann Arbor Savings Bank,
Incorporated 1868
Main Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
Branch Office- -
707 North University Ave.

Farmers & Mechanics Bark
Offers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY - . - EFFICIENCY
,nlent and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
eased With Our Service. Two offices
105 S. Main St. 330 S. State St.
Y"WRITERS of all makes-
ale or Rent. Cleaning &
airing. TPEWI IN G &
IMEOGRAPHING SUPPLIES
02 D M 91

SI. Stbate

-lm!-

582-J

EORGE B BiSCIIOFF
FLORIST.
ioice Cut Flowers and Plants
Chatpin St. Ariz Arbor, Mich,
PHONE 809 M,
STOP AT
T U TTLE'S
338 S. STATE
for sodas and lunches

GIRLS? buy tickets at Beauty Shop and
save $.50 Onf $5.00. Souvenir with
every 5oc purchase of cosmetics.
Miss Mab le. Rowe
5o3 First National Bank Bldg. Phone 2402
FIRST NATL. BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $ oo,000 Surplus and Profit $65,000
DIRECTORS
Wirt Cornwell Waldo M. Abbott
Geo. W, Patterson Harry M. Hawley
S. W. Clarkson Harrison Soule
Fred Schmnid D. B. Sutton,
E. D. Kinnie
After the Show stop at
SUGAR BOW
109 S. Main St.
We make our own Candies and
Ice Cream in our Sanitary Shop

Reporters
B. A. Swaney C. W. Neuriiann
W. R. Atlas C. C. Andrews
R. L. Zeigler 11. C. Garrison
Allen Schoenfield C. G .jickling
Marian Wilson D. . Rood
Business Staff
Bernard Wohl J. E. Robinson
PaulF_ E Choette Harry R. Louis
E. Reed Hunt Harold J. Lance
FEarl F. Ganschow Walter R. Payne
Harold Makinson
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1916.
Night Editor-B. A. Swaney.
News staff and try-outs meet at
12:40 o'clock today in reportorial
rooms.
There are two open places on The
Daily sport staff which will be open
to competition starting today. New
men may consult the sport editor in
The Daily office at 1 o'clock today.
PEANUT POLITICS
The senior law class at Michigan re-
cently held an election for class presi-
dent, and fortunately a tie vote pre-
vented a choice. Fortunately, because
it was found in arranging for a re-
election that peanut politics had been
employed. The student council has,
therefore, ordered both a renomina-
tion and re-election.
Peanut politics in college means
personal solicitation of votes; political
organizations among students; bri-
bery by offering desirable committee
appointments. Peanut politics is the
smallest thing in college life. It may
bring place, but not honor. It is hoped
that the student council and student
body at Michigan will forever fight
peanut politics. Clean politics seems
to coincide with the spirit at Michigan.

An unofficial and approximate canvass
recently showed an overwhelming
sentiment on the campus against pea-
nut politics, and numerous specific ex-
amples have proved that attitude.
Thus a certain student ran for class
treasurer once and won it through
manipulation; and although his pros-
pects for a "campus career" had been
rosy, as soon as his methods were dis-
closed he became practically unknown
for the remaining three years of his,
stay at college.
Public opinion in the United States
generally detests bribery when it is
disclosed. And non-college people un-
deniably look for the development of
cleaner political conceptions in the
modern universities.
"HUMANITY FIRST."
Foreign students in Michigan have
decided to publish a series of articles
upon their native lands. These articles
are to be educational, economic, so-
cial, and geographical in subject matr
ter. They omit political discussions
as futile. They say "Humanity First."}
They are strong for developing them-
selves and their native lands; they
also grow into- the spirit of the Am-
erican school or college they enter,
and they are strong for America. But
chief of all they strive to live up to
the ideal of "Humanity First." The
English-speaking guests of these
foreigners, who are often the cream of
the nations they represent, have a
great opportunity as their companions.
The foreign students can give to the
American youth flashes of insight
into the facts and characters of other
nations. The American student has
the chance to prove that our vaunted
democracy is real, and not the non-
democracy which is limited to one
sector of the map. There are thous-
ands of little ways in which students

tops can't be
mist. Aimany
mb isa-
ears in ;a cloud o
Velvet smoke.
11U 1111i 1111111111111111111111111llili |11f f1i! 1 ii.:iRl t C9lfl1 lll 1f1 11~-
H Hom e Candies
Strictly fresh and of the best quality. Pure cream walnut caramels, as-
sorted nut chocolates in .lb. boxes, 35c. Bitter sweet and chocolate creams
all fresh. Special ice cream sundaes.
THE FOUN TA IN of YO U T H
State St Cor. Libeaty
1111111111111111111111111i . x.1.r P, 1 @ PC119tlilli , ili 1Yi i e1 11i~l 98811i 11111 1111

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gg , k
tiro Ott + F v

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-~ ; ,.. > b, : ---x, =-.. ,_ ... r _-te,

_ 1
> ,.
>. ,
.
i . 5
i
i!i.t ins ,.

- for
CORle Melt
These are two of the
24 popular shapes in
which you can get the
Stratford
7$c and up
W D CHnd Made
$1.00 and up
Each a finepipe,
with sterling silver ring
and vulcanite bit.
Leading dealers in
town carry a full as-
sortmenty Select your
favorite style..
WM. DEMUTH & CO.
New York

213 E Libety S. Phoh 29
- 1511111
Illll
TiC eIfll
11
Detroit, Mich
213e.FLieS A rtPhone re I~
lulll
Another reminder not to forget us when in need of Flowers or any
Occasion Roses, Violets, Sweet Peas, Orchids, Carnations, Chrysan- jj
themums and Potted Plants. Corsage; Work a Specialty. III
Member'Florist TelegZraphi Delivery 'Service. II
--_= =___ __ 'JIra
ANNOUNCING
rAn Exhibi ton
Of
FineOilPafintings
From 1
The Collection of
Jas. E. Hanna& Bros.
206 David Whitney Bldg.
Detroit, Mich.
Del"ries AtStore
Ann Arbor, Mich.
October 30th to November 4th, 1916
i1 1111 111111 11111 1 1iiili x~~cll .~ l ld dii lY ill . I1 111 91111 1E11V

Genuine
French
BBriar

The leather heel has outlived its usefulness. It is
doomed! Hard, nail-studded leather heels are not
adapted to the pavements of this "Concrete Age."
The impact of heel on stone wears down the leather
heel in two or three weeks. The constant jarring caused
by leather heels hurts your nervous system.
Save your heels, your shoes, and'yourself by wearing
O'Sullivan's Heels of New Live Rubber.
They last twice as long as leather heels and keep your
shoes in shape much longer.

MWIMM."

ANAM

1 I

WJ~omen

I.

Glee club will rehearse at 5 o'clock
this afternoon in Sarah Caswell
Angell hail.
Treasurer of Deutscher Verein will
receive dues from 1:30 to 3 o'clock
this afternoon in the Verein room.
- Schedules for indoor gymnasium
work and election blanks for swim-
ming and basketball will be posted to-
day in the gymnasium. Freshmen and
sophomores sign up at once for swim-
ming, as schedules are rapidly fill-
ing up.

INTEREST SHOWN IN FACULTY
1.NCE ASSURES BIG SUCCESS
That the members of the faculty
have not entirely forgotten the days of
their youth is evident by the interest
evinced in the faculty dance at the
Sion tonight. One hundred tickets
have been placed on sale and they are
nearly all gone.
The dance, which is to be formal,
will take place in the big hall under
beautiful autumnal hangings of leaves
and boughs. Favors have been pro-
vide-d, and to rest the minds and
bodies wearied with the unwonted di-
version, Caterer Donovan has prepar-
ed an elaborate intermission lunch to
be served in the dining room.
Dancing will be from 9 until 1
o'clock.
Alarm clocks, $1.00 up. Chapman,
Jeweler, 113 South Main St. tues-sod

When you buy your new shoes,
buy them O'Sullivanized.
Insist on O'Sullivanized shoes; the
new live rubber heels give the
greatest wear with the greatest re-
siliency.

\
p.

Copyrgkt 1916., O'S. R. Co.

"".

w
U

of our colleges can treat the foreign
visitors more like the human beings
and the equals which they are, and
thus help all concerned. The morale
of a student body has sunk low indeed
when the accusation of snobbishness
towards foreign students is proved.
Take with you to the show some
night a man from the Orient, and learn
of his waking, multitudinous people.
Walk with a Hindu and learn of
Rama, of the poetry and power of
Indian thought, and the tremendous
latent possibilities of his race. Hear
from a South-African the truth about
the Boers, and their present stand in
the international conflict. Let a Latin
American spread before your mind's
eye the teeming southern republics as
they really are. And so on, till the
much sought liberal education is more,
truly attained. Thus the idea of uni-
versity approaches more nearly to the
greater idea of universe.

CLASSICAL CLUB MEMBERS WILL
PRESENT PLAY FROM EURIPIDES
At a recent meeting of the Classical
club;.arrangements were made for the
play which the club has decided to
present. Last year the production met
with great success, and with this as
an incentive, the members intend to
give Euripides' "Iphigenia Among the
Tauri." The date for the presentation
has not been announced as yet, but
will appear later with additional in-
formation.
During the course of the meeting,
Prof. H. A. Kenyon and Dr. O. F. But-
ler .gave talks upon the culture and
civilization of the Greeks. The form-
ing of committees, the outlining of
plans, and initiation. constituted the
remainder of the business.
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. 18-tf

0 ~
o00

-

----

STRAND
BLK. N? 605 TAN

BY PHA
Wagner & Co.
STATE ST. - At the Head of LIBERTY ST.

ior advisors pay 50
ed Harrington, '18,

cents tax to
or at Dean

B. J

ordan's office.
n spread tax of $1.00 should
once to Olive Wiggins, '19.
1 Jordan's office,

N? 505

a

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