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October 31, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-31

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ANN ARBOR-
RAIN AND
WARMER

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D ILY

UNITED PRESS WIR
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER I
ANN ARBOR

4

CXVTTNn 24

} 1l, IN U. Zff.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENT"

PRIE FVE_ N'

&V a

IOLENT COUNTER
DHIVE ON SMME
LMOUS BERLIN AND BRANDEN-
BURGER TROOPS MAKE
FIERCE ATTACK

.._

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Bryan Neutral
on Lodge Charge

I - -

TALENTFOR BOOST

t I

Ex-Secretary of State.Safe
Can Answer for
Himself

...O

FRENCH LOSE NEAR PERONNE
On Eastern Front Cetrail Allies Con.
tinue to Gain on Transyl-
VanIani Border
London, Oct. 30.-Berlin and Brand-
enburger troops, famed for. their fight-
ing at Verdun, launched one of the
most violent counter attacks of the
whole battle against the line south of
the Somme last night. The French war
offte admitted this afternoon that the
Germans penetratcd La Maisonette
farm west of Peronne, but claimed the
repulse of other heavy attacks.
The German war office reported the
capture of La Maisonette and all the
French positions extending from the
farm to Bianches together with 412
prisoners. British gains in the fight-
ing north of the, river were admitted
at Berlin.
Along the Transylvania frontier the
Austo-Germans and Romanians are en-
gaged in a series of battles. The Ger-
man war office announced the capture3
of several heights southeast of the
famous Red Tower Pass but conceded
a Roumanian victory southwest of;
Svurduk pass. Unofficial reports
from Petrograd declared that Falken-
hayn's forces had been pushed back
three miles by the Roumanians northt
of Kimpulung. In Dobrudja a fresh1
battle is believed imminent. The Ber-
lin official statement .declares that
Mackensen's pursuing detachments1
are now in touch with the retreating j
Russo-Roumanian infantry and cav-

Cedar Rapids, Neb., Oct. 30.-"Why
should I discuss what is purely a
cabinet question? Why should Bre.k-
enridge? It is a matter for the pral-
dent. If he has any reply to make
he is perfectly able to make it." This
was William Jennings Bryan's reply
when asked today regarding the Lodge
charge, that the president appended a
very tame postscript to the "strict ac-
countability" note to Germany in the
Lusitania case.
Ashbury Park, N. I., Oct. 30-Ae.
companied by his full staff in brilliant
oriental uniforms, Viscount Sato, the
new Japanese ambassador to the
United States, today presented his
credentials to President Wilson with
formal greetings, and expressions of
hopes for a continuance of the friendly
relations existing between the two
governments.
Melbourne, Oct, 30.-With the tes
of Australian soldiers abroad un-
counted, returns from Saturday's ref-
erendum, otherwise complete, showed'
the defeat of the conscription measure
by a majority of 86,000. While the
soldiers' vote is expeoted to be over-'
whelmingly in favor of conscription, it1
is not believed it will offset this, ma-
jority. The "ayes" numbered 851,000
and those opposed 937,000.-

Eight Features Planned for Frio
Night's Band Entertain.
ment
WOMEN TO APPEAB IN CA
Sallies of wit, tuneful melod1
fantastic posing by aesthetic dance
and the production of a mirth-provc
ing pantomime were some of t
salient features of the first Band Bo(
rehearsals which took place in Sar
Caswell Angell hall last night.

day
rs,
the
ost
ah

Berlin, Oct. 30.-The death of Cap-
tain Boelcke, Germany's greatest air
hero, was confirmed by the semi-of-
ficial news agency today. During an
engagement Saturday, Boelcke col-
lided with another aeroplane and died
as he landed behind the German-lines.
The day before he had landed his
fortieth enemy plane.

Among the eight features promised
by Manager Walter R. Atlas, '18, for
next Friday's entertainment, are sev-
eral musical acts said to be of excep-
tional merit. J. H. Stevens, '18E, and
his mandolin will hold the stage for
one number, J. L. Lundberg, '18D, and
C. A. Rebentisch, '16D, both members
f the band, will figure prominently
with their cornets. Arthur L. Murray,
School of Music, is on the program for
several rollicking melodies, and L. A.
Emmerman, '18L, "Michigan's Al Jl-
sen," late leading man of the Sock and
Buskin club of Western Reserve Uni-
versity, will follow suit. -
A dancing act with a cast of 13
women, headed by Helen L. Champion,
'17, was unable to conduct its rehearsal
but it is said that the feature will be
in the nature of a surprise in the way
of classical terpsichorean portrayal.
All will be in readiness, however, for
the first dress rehearsal which is
called for' Wednesday evening.
Members of the committee for dis-
posing of the tickets have been actively
engaged. Chairman H. C. Garrison,
'17, has appointed the following men
to assist him in the capacity of sub-
chairmen: C. W. Neuman, '18, H. D.
Sturtevant, '17, K. L. Wehmeyer, '18,
James S. Schermerhorn, Jr., '18, R. M.
SchiUer, '18, T. F. McAllister, '18, C.
F. B6ss, '18, A. V. Livingston, '18E, C.
K. Reichart, '17E, W. G. Johnson, 'ISE,
H. H. Whittingham, '17E, S. G. Pratt,
'18E, H. W. Collins, '18E, E. A. Thom-
as, '17E, J. M. Hopkins, '17D, J. W.
Thomas '17L, Jerome Zeiger, '19M, and
L. W..Nieter, '17. These men have
ten others working for them for the
purpose of covering the campus.
Marian Wilson, '18, has been ap-
pointed women's sales manager and
with a corps of 18 assistants is sell-
ing tickets among the sororities,,
league houses, and dormatories. P. C.
Pack, '18, has been selected to take
care of the city sales.

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,

for some time was held last evenin
in the School of Music auditorium
Most of the men out were in the clu
last year.
The hour was spent mostly upo
some of the favorite campus songs
including the "Victors." According t
Theodore Harrison, who has charge o
the club, prospects for this season ar
even brighter than they were last year
From the 250' tryouts who have ap
peared during the last two weeks
there has been abundant materia
from which to choose a winning club
The names of those in the club no
appearing below will be given ou
later in the week. The following men
hav.e been chosen and were out fox
practice last evening.
First tenor: H. L. Davis, '17, T. S
Bernett, '18M, H. K. Kenna, '19, Harry
Liebeskind, '18, L. H. Scott '18, C. F
Watson, '17, Rex R. Cherryman, '19
G. K. Bolenger, '18D, J. L. Driscoll
'18, D. P. Wood, '19B.
Second tenor: F. W. Grover, '18
C. C. Bailey, '17, Prescott Smith, '17
A. T. Heuer, '18, C. E. Hardy, '17E
Joseph Palma, '18, F. W. Sullivan, Jr.,
'18, James A. Dorsey, '19.
First bass: C. B. Sikes, '17, R. R.
Dieterle, '18, W. S. Westerman, '17, E.
L. Ziegler, '19L, D. J. DeButts, '18E,
M. S. Ballard, '20H, Richard Hardy,
'17, P. Wilcox, '18.
Second bass: H. L. Haag, '17, R. J.
McCandliss, '18, L. A. Lundquist, '19,
G. Fischbach, Jr., '17, E. F. Hagen,
'17E, C. F. Weaver, '19E, W. L. Kemp,
'18.

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GLEE CLUBD PICKS
THIRTY-THHREE MEN
Theodore Harrison Says Prospects
Are Brighter This Year
Than Ever
250 TRYOUTS HAVE APPEARED
One of the most spirited initial re-
hearsals that the Glee club has known

gineering fraternity, has elected 12
senior engineers to membership.
These men were all picked from the
highest one-fourth of the class in
scholarship. This makes the second
and last election from this class.
The men who were honored by the
election are as follows: Melvin D. An-
derson, Louis F. Dieterich, Stanley H.
Emerick, John B. Franke, Dick B.
Gardner, William F. Gerhardt, Lamar
M: Kishlar, J. Hawley Otis, James R.
Pollock, Thomas W. Sheehan, Harold
A. Taylor, Ralph S. Scott, -and Tom
Tobey.
The initiation and banquet will be
held Nov. 22, at the Union.
LE GAL1IENNE WILL
GIVE LECTURE NOV. 2
Distinguished English Poet to Come
Under Auspices of the Orator-
ical Association

Elect Thirteen
to oTau eta Pi
Tau Beta Pi, national, honor en-

2
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- WILTON PLEADSUiLTY
TO BURROUGHS ROBBERY
Henry Ford Visits Young Bandit; Re-
fuses to Discuss Purpose
of Interview
Detroit, Oct. 30.-James Walton,
leader of the trio of bandits who
robbed the pay car of the Burroughs'
Adding Machine company of $32,500
here last August, pleaded guilty to
robbery while armed, when arraigned
before Police Justice Stein. He was
held to the next term of the Recorder's
court for sentence under $10,000 bond.
The 23-year-old bandit showed un-
concern during the brief court pro-
ceedings. He was unshaven, and his.

New York, Oct. 30.-Wall street
tickers this afternoon reported that
about $18,000 was placed on the elec-
tion today at odds of ten to nine on
Hughes.
HUGHES REPLIES TO WILSON
Tells 10,000 That American Laborer
"Is Not to Be Deluded"

DONALDSON LINER
SUNK BY U-6T
W1THOUTWARN/NI
SHIP'S CREW NOT ALL ACCOUNTE
FOR; TWO LIFE BOATS
MISSING
TWO AMERICANS ON "MARIN
Rowan More Sunk While Attemptin
to Escape From Sub-
marine

EIGT STATES FOR W I LSON

I1

Mi

cCormack
Votes

Says President
During Past Two
Weeks

Gains

News has just been received by the
.Vniversity Oratorical association that
Richard Le Gallienne, the distingu-
ished English poet, will be in Ann Ar-
bor to lecture on Thursday, Nov. 2,
of this week. Mr. Le Gallienne is
now quite as much favored in this
country p.s in England. He is to all
intents and purposes an American au,_
thor. For the greater part of the year
he makes his home in New York. His
three latest books have been brought
out by New York publishers-Putnams
and the Harpers.
Mr. Le Gallienne was born Jan. 30,
1866. He started life in a business
office in Liverpool, but abandoned this
to turn author. After quitting his
ledgers, he went up to London where
for some months he acted as secre-
tary to Wilson Barrett, famous Eng-
lish actor. This prepared the. way for
his genuine literary de ,Awith the
"Book Bills of Narcissus; r4h in the
estimation of many criticy remains one
of his most. charming works. The
book at once established Le Gallienne's
reputation, which was presently con-
firmed by his "George Meredith," a
just and subtle appreciation. The
range and quality of his general critic-
ism are well represenited by "Retro-
spective Reviews" (2 vols., 1896).
As a poet. Mr. Le Gallienne is now
recognized as one. of the captains of
song. He is perhaps best known asi
a lyric poet, whose place was' fixedv
many years ago. His strong yet deli-t
cate art entitles him' beyond a doubtd
to the rank of the greatest livingA
lyrist. This is. easily apparent to
those who have read his latest volume,«
"The Lonely Dancer." Here one finds
fragrance and color, charm and mel-a
ody, performing the mystery of songa
on every page.
Mr. Le Gaienne is the author of t
more than 30 books of verse and prose,Y
nearly all of which have received highp
praise from\Phe critics, the public andn
his fellow-poets. He counts nearly alln
the writer, of Europe and Americans
as friends and admirers. He was a b
close friend of Swinburne, Georger
Meredith, Ibsen (whom he often vis-
ited), and other famous writers. S

Washington, D. C., Oct. 30.--The
Donaldson liner, Marina, flying the
British flag, was sent to the bottom
without warning by shell fire from a
German submarine Saturday after-
noon, about 100 miles west of Cape
Clear, according to reports from.-
American Consul Frost, at Queens-
town.
There were two Americans and five
Fillipinos in the crew of 104. Of this
number, 34 have been landed at Brook-
haven, while life boats numbers one
and three are missing.
While attempting escape from a sub-
marine, the Furness freighter, Rowan
More, sailing from Baltimore to Liver-
pool, was attacked and sunk. The
ship, according to a report from Con-
sul Frost, attempted to run away for
50 minutes. Her steering gear was
shot away, and the master brought
the vessel to a stop, signaling that he
was abandoning her. The submarine
continued shelling, and shelled the life
boats after they had cleared. There
were, however, no casualties.
Reports of the destruction of four
other ships have reached London in
the past 24 hours. They were the
Danish steamer Sif, the Russian three-
master Ingersoll, the Norwegian bark
Regina, and the Greek steamer An-
gheliki. The Marina was a steel screw
steamer of 5,204 tons.
BRECKINRIDGE HURLS
"LIE" AT SENTOR LOOS

light gray suit was badly wrinkled as
a result of two nights in the police
cell block, and of the long railway
journey from Dallas,tTexas, where he
was captured more than a week ago.
Walton was returned to police head-
quarters immediately after his arraign-
ment. He and his bride of seven
months are penniless. The girl slept
at the women's detention home last
night, because she had no place to go.
Henry Ford visited Walton at his
cell today, but he did not make his
identity known to the prisoner. Later
Walton was questioned about the in-
terview.
"Was that Henry Ford?" he asked
in surprise. "Yes, he was in here. He
looked me over, shook his head, and
said, 'Uh, huh, you'll know better the
next time.' I guess he's a pretty food
fellow at that."
Ford told reporters he did not care
to discuss the purpose of his visit to,
the bandit's cell.
HUNDREDS SEE VISION OF NEW
UNION AS BIG TRACTOR DIGS'

By Perry Arnold
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
East Liverpool, Ohio, Oct. 30.-Ten'
thousand assembled in the open air
to hear nominee Hughes vigorously de-
clared that "the American work-
ing man is not to be deluded by the
suggestion that we now have a satis-
factory prosperity." He -quoted Ed-
ward M. Hurley, chairman of the fed-
eral trade commission to back his pre-
diction that America must redouble
her efforts if she is successfully to
compete with Europe after the war. It
was direct answer to President Wil-
son's Cincinnati speech.
"The present campaign is an import-
ant one" Hughes asserted, "because
it involves the future of American
labor. It was only 20 months ago
when, we had hundreds of thousands
of unemployed workmen throughout
the land."
MICHIGAN DAMES CELEBRATE
AT WIERD HALLOWE'EN PITT

M
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HEALTH SERVICE WARNS
STUDENTS OF.-SMALLPOX

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Four Cases of Disease Reported
Ypsilanti; To Give Free
Vaccination

Chicago, Oct. 30.-President Wilson
will be given a majority in Illinois,
New York, Ohio, Connecticut, New
Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and West
Virginia, according to Vance McCor-
mack, chairman of the Democratic na-
tional committee who was here today
for a party conference. Indiana can
also be regarded as a Wilson state, he
says.
"It looks likce a landslide," Mc-
Cormack said, "I find conditions all
over the country improving over what
they were when I was here two weeks
ago. New York is for the President
and for him big. Newspaper tolls and
private advices all go to show that the
President is making gains steadily."

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"Trouble, trouble, boil and bubble,"
were the words of the witch as she
began the fortunes of the husbands of
Michigan Dames at the Hallowe'en
party yesterday evening. Wierd ob-
jects, evading the touch, ghosts, with
clammy hands and dark witches on
the verge of flying off on their broomsi
sticks, all lent interest to the merry
group.
A burning caldron, from which flow-
ed sweet cider, and hanging baskets
filled with doughnuts were fitting
"eats" for the occasion. The air was
filled with fun making, and all the
jolly Dames and their fortunate hus-
bands made merry at the first social
event of the Michigan Dames.

Says Note Attacking Wilson Is "Be-
neath Contempt"; Calls Inform-
ant "Scoundrel"

Four cases of smallpox were report-
ed in Ypsilanti yesterday afternoon.
Warning has been issued by the Tgni-
versity health service advising that
students be vaccinated at once in ord-
er to check a spread of the epidemic.
In compliance with this report, the
University health service department
:issg*d a statement last-night that free
vaccination will be given attheir head-
quarters today between the hours of 8
to '12 o'clock, and from 2 to 4 o'clock.
In addition to this the department re-
commended that those students who
have not been vaccinated within the
last five years take another treatment
in order to be secure from getting the
disease.
No definite information could be se-
cured last night as to the origin of
the epidemic, and whether it would ne-
cessitate the closing of the educational
institutions of that city. The author-
ities of the health service are offer-
ing free vaccination today to avoid a
spread of the disease in this commun-
ity and students desiring treatment are
urged to take advantage of this precau-
tion.

TWO CLASSES ELECT HEADS

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Fresh Lits to Choose Officers Today in
Corridor of Library

k

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Two classes held their elections yes-
terday for the purpose of choosing of-
ficers for the coming year. Fresh lits
who were to have held their election
yesterday will choose their heads to-
day from 1 to 5 o'clock in the corridor
of the general Library. The results
of the balloting were as follows:
Sophomore medics: President, W.
A. Johnston; vice-president, Catharine
Acklen; secretary, T. P. Lee; treas-
urer, H. E. Bozer; athletic manager,
C. E. Badgley.
Fresh homeops: President, J. H.
Cobane; vice-president, M. S. Ballard;
secretary, W. F. Weinkauf; treasurer,
H. J. Hyde; athletic manager, H. J.
Brisbois.

CANADA BARS PUBLICATION
BECAUSE OF RECENT ARTICLE
New York, Oct. 30.-Pearson's Maga-
zine of this city announced yesterday
that it had been barred by the Cana-
diau censor from circulation in the
dominion. The October issue of Pear-
son's had an article characterizing the
refusal of Great Britain to allow-
American supplies to pass to the starv-
ing Poles under practicable conditions
as the blackest crime against human-
ity in the whole war.
Yale Team Preparing for Colgate
New Haven, Oct. 30.-There is no
rest for the weary Yale team. Cocky
today after their impressive victory
over Washington and Jefferson, the
blue players prepared to go into
strenuous preparations for their game
next Saturday with Colgate..
Freshman Medics Gain Seven Students
The freshman medics gained seven
new students this year, making a total
of 115 attending classes in the course.
The number attending last year were
108. About 30 were conditioned or
failed to pass the examinations.

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New York, Oct. 30.-Henry C. Breck-
inridge, former assistant secretary of
war, yesterday denounced the attack of
Senator Henry Cabot Lodge on Presi-
dent Wilson as "beneath contempt."
Mr. Breckinridge also characterized
Senator Lodge's alleged informant as
"a scoundrel."
The statement of the former assist-
ant secretary of war is in the form of
a telegram which he sent to the Phila-
delphia Ledger, which called his atten-
tion to Senator Lodge's declaration
hat President Wilson had added an ap-
pendix to the "strict accountability"
note to the effect that its contents were
not to be taken seriously and that he
suppressed it only after several mem-
bers of the cabinet had threatened to
resign.
Mr. Breckinridge's telegram is from
San Mateo, Cal., and is as follows:
"Any one who quoted me to Senator
Lodge as represented in your telegram
as quoted is a scoundrel. No member
of President Wilson's cabinet ever
hreatened him on any subject. The
malice that would seek for partisan ad-
antage to emasculate the potency of
one's government in a vital interna-
ional affair by the mongering of back
tairs gossip is beneath contempt.
"HENRY C. BRECKINRIDGE."

PROFESSOR IS HERO OF SOM

E. M1. Lebard, Long Instructor
University of Wiscoxsin, Wins
Honor in France

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BAD WEATHER HANDICAP TO
ITALIAN FRONT OPERATIONS

"Some little digger, eh boy ?"
Hundreds. of passers-by on State
,reet every day say this, or some-
ling like it. And each one has a
uiet little smile on his face as he
ops for a moment and watches the
ank" tractor tear great furrows into
.e ground, and lift the damp, black
rt into the wagons as fast as they
'e loaded.

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Mount Clemens Club to Initiate Four
The Mt. Clemens club will initiate
four new members Friday evening in
their club rooms, making a total of 19
new members this year. Mt. Clemene
is a sectional club which i 25 years
old, and has recently received official
"m^" iin

Armenian Card Day Get $300 for Fund
A report made by the University Y.
W. C. A., in charge of the Armenian
card day, shows that the amount of
money received on Saturday totaled
$300. Contributions are still coming'
in, and on account of this the fund will
be left open until the end of the week.

1

Rome, Oct. 30.-Unfavorable weath-
er conditions on the Austro-Italian
front are interfering with operations
and only artillery activity is reported
in today's war office statement, which
reads as follows:
Artillery duels took place yesterday
in the Adige valley, in the region of
Monte Cauriol, and on the Julian front.
Bad weather prevails throughout the
theater of operations.

Madison, Wis., Oct. S0.-Prof. E. M.
Lebard, French citizen, though long an
educator in American schools, and who
was head of the department of ro-
mance languages at the state univer-
sity when the European war started, is
in a French hospital with severe
wounds, but wearing the French cross
of honor for bravery. He was form-
ally decorated by a general officer in
his cot in a French hospital after a
gallant fight on the Somme front. This
is the word received by some of his

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