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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 01, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


d_,

CT& K, KNARPPAELT ANWDOBBS HATS 1TRAwSHATS

TRA W HATS

0

Bring in your old hat and we will allo wyou Sac toward a
new one. From $2.00 up.

We have the Stiff or Soft Sailors,
also a large selection of Panamas

Ask to see our sport coats from $8.50 to $10.00.
Flannel Pants from $5.00 to $6.00.

White

and Leghorns

s

:

0

Wadhams & Co.

J. F. WUERTH CO.
Next to Orpheum
ANN ARBOR. MICH.
FOR ELECTRIC REPAIRS
OF ALL KINDS CALL
Washtenaw Electric Shop
The Shop of Quality
-i-t- not Right we make it Right
Phone 273 200 East Washington St.

U

I

State Street

Main Street

SUSPENSION CASES ARE
CIE N IN HONOR REPORT

Your Floral Needs=-
Are BEST SA-NSFIED By Us
PHONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION
=COUSINS & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Members of Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
SystemI
PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Go,
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

I

COLLEGES DROP INSTRUCTORS
AS WAR ECONOMY 31EASURE
Pecreasing Income Results from De-
parture of Students
for War
Princeton, N. J., May 31.-Many col-
leges throughout the country are drop-
ping professors as a war economy
measure; according to the Princeton-
Ian, the student publication of Prince-
ton university.
Educational institutions face a fi-
pancial crisis as the result of the
withdrawal of students, especially
those institutions who depend on tui-
tions for their maintenance. In some
cases loss of dormitory rentals and
other undergraduate payments add to
the seriousness of the situation.
Princeton will decrease the staff of
instructors next year, and drop those
whose terms of service end with the
present year. The 800 or 900
men who are expected to return next
year will be provided for by those
professors who are on permanent ten-
ure.
Browi university will follow a
similar course of action. Elementary
work will be done by older men, and
all appropriations for books and other
supplies will be curtailed. Other dras-
tic measures of economy will be in-
stituted,
Measures of a similar character will

TYRONE 9'2Y8 f.
'OARROW
form-fit
COLLAR
TOPS AND RANDS ARE CURVE CUT.
TO FIT TUE SHOULDERS. 2 for 306
CUFTTPEABODY&CaIff4ciAIR$
be adopted by New Yorl university,
Delaware college, and Bryn lawr,
which faces a deficit of $40,000 if the
expenses of the college continue at
the present rate, has gone so far as
to request all students to notify the
hall warden when they are going to
be absent from a meal so that the
food will not be wasted,
TO HOLD COMEDY CLUB TRYOUTS
Candidates Will ive Readings or E;-
temporaneous Talks Tomorow

THREE STUDENTS ARE GIVEN E'S
AND SIX DENIED PRIVILEGE
OF SYSTEM
Four men were suspended for a sem-
ester or longer, who were not only
found guilty of resorting to dishonor-
able methods during examinations, but
also used false statements in their de-
fense, according to the report of the
student honor committee of the eng-
ineering college for May 31.
Other cases considered and decide.]
upon are:
Seven in which there was insuffici-
ent evidence for conviction; one case
in which two men were found acting
against the principles of the honor
system in a class blue book and re-
ceived zero in the exercises; two cases
in which men immediately confessed
as having given aid in examinations
and were given warning which will
weigh heavily in the event of future
offense; three cases in which men im-
mediately confessed to having receiv -
ed aid in final examinations, and were
given, E in the course; and six cases
in which men were found guilty of
receiving aid either from fellow stu-
dents, or from "cribs," and were pro-
hibited from future examination under
the honor system,
According to members of the com-
mittee, great impetus has been given
to the idea of honor in examinations
and class room work during the last
year.
One whole class composed of 50
juniors pledged their future support
to any person who should uphold the
standard of honor in spite of the dis-
agreeable duty of reporting or warn-
ing a man, and it is' this spirit which
the honor committee, according to the
report is striving to develop.
Michigan to Have
Big Aviation F ield

APPOINT FACULTY MEN
AS DRILL UNIT OFFICERS
1 OUIR RANKING COLONELS AND A
MAJOR WILL COMMAND
ORGANIZATIONS
Appointments of members of the
faculty to officers in the numerous
student drill organizations by Major
Charles W. Castle, U. S. A., have been
approved by President Harry B.
Hutchins and by -the deans of the de-
partments concerned.
They are as follows: Mr. Philip G.
Bartelme to be brigade adjutant with
the rank of colonel; Mr. Philip E.
Bursley to be commandant of the lit-
erary companies with the rank of
colonel; Major Clyde E. Wilson, M. N.
G. retired, to be commandant of en-
gineering companies; Prof. Paul H.
DeKruif to be commandant of the
medical companies with the rank of
colonel; Prof. Horace I. Wilgus to be
commandant of the law companies
with the rank of colonel.
All schedules and rules that have
been prescribed by University author-
ities regarding cadet organizations
will remain in effect, and all existing
appointments of students acting as of-
ficers and non-commissioned officers
will also remain in effect, though they
may be subject to change by proper
authorities.
The arrangements of the companies
and appointments of officers are pro-
visional, applying only to the current
semester.
CANDIDATE CAN TAKE EXAMS
FOR LIEUTENANCY JULY 23

s

"'

SPECIAL ORDER JEWELRY
JEWELRY REPAIRING

WATCH REPAIRING
OPTICAL REPAIRING
EYE GLASS LENSES GROUND IN OUR OWN SHOP
PROMPT SERVICE
HALLER & FULLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS

Concerning Accessories
The better dressed a woman is, the more, she appreciates the in-
portance of the right sort of neckwear and blouses and handbags and
such things. And the more certain she is to appreciate the HUTZEL
Shop's accessories.
Hutzbyls's
Main and Liberty, Streets

STRAW HATS

Tf'

"YOUNG'S

STRAWS" and "PANAMAS"
The New Shapes

Varsity
1107

To gery,
S. University Ave.

Shop

m

Successful
With

Examinees Begin
$1,70 Salary, Plus
Allowances

Duty Nix on

< < 27ritz

Spring tryouts for admission to thej
Comedy club will be held from 9 to 12
o'clock tomorrow morning in the aud-
itorium of Newberry hall. Candidates
will be required to give a short ex-
temporaneous talk or read a brief sel-
ection. The committee of judges will
select the new members within a short
time after the tryouts have been com-
pleted.
Another film play probably will be
given under the auspices of the or-
ganization in the near future, "Skin-
ner's Dress Suit," which appeared at
the Arcade theater last week was
given under the direction of the club.
Gilbert's, Morse's box candies. The
Delta.-Adv.
Delta Cafe open Commencement
week.- Table d'hote service, Special
parties by arangements,-Adv, 30

A merican Flying Corps Will'
Over Lake St.
Clair

'Traiun

Joy aviation field, scene of action
for the American flying corps, will be
a fully equipped city within 60 days
on the shore of Lake St. Claire, three
miles from Mt. Clemens, Mich.
Since the government took over the
field from Mr. Henry B. Joy of De-
troit, roads have been started, ground
has been broken for the construction
of barracks and hangars, stations pro-
vided for receiving supplies, water and
sewerage systems are being laid, and
the Grand Trunk railroad has starte'
an extension from Mt. Clemens to the
new city.
"As a spectacle, the training camp
will be the greatest show that we have
ever staged," said Henry B. Joy in
discussing the camp.
The field is a broad level plain about
a mile square, offering both land and
water courses where the aviator may
practice bomb dropping without in-
jury to the Great Lakes traffic or to
the surrounding land.
"The development of this industry
means something more than great ec-
onomic opportunities," Mr. Joy said
further. "I believe that next to the
Britsh fleet, the aviation motor will
prove the determining facto.r i the

Examinations for commissions as
second lieutenant in the regular army
will take place on July 23. Candidates
must be within the age limits of 21 to
27 years, unmarried, and citizens of
the United States. Those who are not
yet 21 years old can enlist in the army
and take the examination after one
year of service.
Successful candidates begin duty
with $1,700 pay a year, and several
hundred dollars in allowances, and are
placed in regular line of promotion in
their branch of service.
More than 1,000 vacancies will ex-
ist by July 1, and in case the regular
army is expanded to full war strength
the number of vacancies will exceed
4,000.
Graduates of universities sometimes
can obtain exemption from the sub-
jects prescribed for examination.
Those desiring to obtain complete in-
formation should write to the adjut-
ant general of the army, Washington,
D. C., and ask for a copy of general
orders number 64, war department,
1915, and for a blank form to use in
applying for permission to be exam-
ined.
Go to Wilkinson's for your Trunks,
Bags, and Suitcases, where luggage is
good and prices are right. Opposite
Wuerth Arcade, 325 So, Main St.-
Adv. tf

- It's "Heinyey
London, May 31.-"Heineys" is the
new name applied by the Canadians to
the Germans. With many units it has
superseded Fritz, Boche and Hun.
"The preliminary barrage," said a
Scottish Canadian N. C. O. in describ-
ing an assault, "Sounded like some-
one slithering his hand up the notes
of a piano and down again. The guns
must have set the Heineys' teeth rat-
tling like peas in a box.
"Before the attack we spotted a
sentry in a sap and were told to get
him. We went a long way around,!
but he must have heard us splashing
in the mud. for he beat it down a dug-
out. When we got up to the sap, we
found it had a little dinner bell hang-
ing to a wire. He was supposed to
ring it when a raid started. But he
was an oldish guy with glasses and
he didn't think there was time to do
It. There wasn't another soul in the
front line."

SOLD BY

THE

SPRUNK

ENG RAVING

Co.

Has Moved to

Hamilton Business College

City News

LOST
LOST-At Ferry field tennis courts, a
green Borcilino hat Wednesday
morning. Call at 717 E. Huron or
phone 1022-R for reward.
LOST-Conklin pen between 615 E. U.
and Tappan hall, May 31. Finder
please return to above address. Re-
ward.
LOST-Conklin pen May 28, on the
campus or southeast of campus.
Telephone 781-R.
LOST-Round-Up Pin, owner's name
on the back. Call L. J. Richards,
1884-W and receive reward. 1-2
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Ninety law books includ-
ing 33 volumes of Michigan Reports,
also book case and two phaetons at
911 Forest Ave. Phone 1463. 27-2inc

WANTED
WANTED-Two men with previous
selling experience preferred. To
represent a high class educational
library during vacation or perman-
ently. Big money to right parties.
Phone 1231-W olr call 819. E. huron,
12 to 4 Saturday.
WANTED- Four experienced Dining
Room girls for a first lass spmmer
resort. Apply stating experience.
Address Box L. M., Daily.
MISCELLANEQUS
AN INTELI4GENT person may earn
$100 monthly corresponding for
newspapers; $40 to $50 monthly in
spare time; experience pnnecessary;
no canvassirg; subjects suggested.
Send for partielars. National Press
Bureau, Room 2558, Buffalo, N. Y.-
USb Daily Want-Ada.

Camp
sale at
House.

and canoe Victrola outfits for
Schaeberle & Son's Music
110 S. Main St.-Adv.

Delta Cafe open Commencement
week. Table d'hote service. Special

war"
fLET US

parties by arrangement.-Adv.

30

The Unitarian Students' society will
hold a business meeting at 6:30
o'clock Sunday evening in the church
parlors. Officers for the coming year
will be elected at this time.
R. B. James, Ypsilanti, was fined $5
and costs for speeding on the Ypsilanti
road Wednesday.
Prof. Arthur Whitmore Smith of
the physics department of the Univer-
sity won his suit against Scheffer and
company, brokers, in the circuit court
here yesterday. The brokers failed to
sell certain Russian war bonds plac-
ed with them by the professor when
they were instructed to dispose of
them. After the bonds fell in price,
Professor Smith sued for the differ-
encein value. A verdict was rendered
in his favor for $412.90.
Ann Arbor commandery, Knights
Templar, will attend the state con-
clave at Kalamazoo Tuesday, leav-
ing here by special interurban car at
6 o'clock.

700 Marquette Bldg.
YARDS FULL OF DESTROYERS
STATES SECRETARY DANIELS
Washington, May 31.-America is
building as many destroyers as her
ship yards can accommodate, accord-
ing to an announcement today from
Secretary Daniels.
Miss Reichenbach to Lecture Today
Miss Nellie Reichenbach, head of the
investment department of the Macca-
bees of Detroit, will deliver the sec-
ond lecture of the series on fraternal
insurance companies at 3 o'clock to-
day in room 401 Mason hall. Miss
Reichenbach will discuss the invest-
ment of the mortuary fund and th-e
statutes of the various states apply-
ing to this fund.
Get your Canoe Lunch for the Re-
gatta at the Delta. Phone 817-M.-
Adv. *1-2
There is opportunity in The Michi-
gan Daily Adst. Read them.

SEND YOU.I

I

AN ASSORTMENT OF VICTOR RECORDS
on our twenty-four hour approval plan! Select a dozen numbers, you
would like to hear in your own home. Phone us, 1707, and we will
send same,
VICTOR VICTROLAS FROM $15.00 TO $300.00
CONVENIENT PAYMENTS!I
GRINN EL L BROTHERS
116 SOUTH MAIN STREET

i

i

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