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June 01, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-06-01

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DAILY

a 1

Queries Arising Relative
o Reasons for Entering
Conflict
OF SLRIES Of ARTICLES
UTEN BY STUART H. PERRY

Arguments Showing
>r Our Lending Aid
to Allies

Cause

article, the firet of a series
by Stuart H. Perry, and first
d in the Adrian Telegram and
ieously in the Detroit Free
vill be followed by other ar-
om time to 'time.)

Over and over again these questions
ave been asked: Why should we not
emain strictly neutral in the Euro-
iean war? How can we justify our-
elves in helping the allies defeat Ger-
rany?
These were fair questions, and-those
Who asked were not necessarily pro-
aerman, anti-British or un-American.
These questions will be answered in
series of articles of which this is
lhe first. They' will aim to make clear
he reasons why neutrality was neither
afe, fair nor prudent, and why it was
ct only our right but also a duty and
necessity that we lend our aid to the
Lefeat of Germany and the success of
he allies.
Three Reasons Outlined
One nation joins another against a
hird power for some one or more of
hese three reasons:
1. The two allies may have a com-
non Interest to protect; or
2. They may be confronted by a
ommon danger; or
3. One of the two allies may be
threatened by some special danger of
ts own and therefore may be willing
. ally itself with a friendly power
or mutual advantage.
All three of the above reasons exist
n the case of the Un'ited States toda.
First we will take up the subject of
he interests that we have in common
with the allies, but which we do not
hare with Germany. These are four
n number.
Common Interest in Democracy
1. The first, and in the long run by
'ar the greatest of these, is the com-
non interest that we have with France
ind England in the principle of demo-
3ratic government. England was the
'mother of parlianents," the first na-
ion to establish successfully a true
Oovernment of the people'.
As England discovered and created
ree representative government, and
planted it in the new regions of the
World, so France rediscovered human
iberty and gave it to the oppressed
eople of the old world. It is to Eng-
and that North America, Africa, and
dustralia owe their liberties; but it is
o France that continental Europe
wes such liberties as it possesses,
nd it is to France as much as to
Ragland that South America owes its
epublicanism.
Europe Owes Much to France
By a mighty effort which will always
hine as one of the most glorious
vents in human history, France
hook off despotism. On all sides
hrones tottered, Italy, Spain, Norway,
nd Sweden, Belgium and Holland,
'reece and the Balkan states, all owe
heir constitutional governments, and
ome of them their existence, to
'rance. Russia is the latest and great-
st to imitate her. France taught Eu-
ope that despots can be got rid of,
nd that a nation can be great and
owerful as a republic.
Prussia and Austria, on the other
and, stand for the old order-despotic
ule by divine right. They hate
'rance, England and the United States
ecause all three of them are living
xamples of successful and victorious
epublicanism.
Hold Interest of Independenee
2. The second interest that we hold
4 common with Germany's enemies
s the right of every nation to exist
s an independent, self-governing
ower, bowing to no alien master,
eading its own life and working out
s own destiny. This right is as
atural and as sacred as the right of
ndividual liberty recognized in our
)eclaration of Independence. Ger-
nany is the living negation of that
flea. Her aim, interpreted by her
reatest writers and reflected in all
er actions, is to bring the world un-

er German hegemony.
Free Access to World Market
3. The third interest that unites us
Sunday evening luncheon Delta
afe balance of school year.-Adv.
Have your shoes full-soled in oleath-
r -or Neolin. We speciaUse in this
rork. O. G. Andres. 230 So. State. -134

with the allies is the principle of free
access to the world's markets. We
believe that American, French, Ger-
man, Japanese or Dutch merchants
should have a free and fair field in
selling their goods or investing their
capital in the undeveloped regions of
the earth-that they should compete
freely and get as much as their skill
and ability can win. The German idea,
on the contrary, is to make commer-
cial conquest through political con-
quest; or, in other words, to use the+
political influence of a dominant Ger-
many to stimulate German trade and
smother foreign competition in weak1
or undeveloped lands.,
Monroe Doctrine Enters as Factor
4. The first three interests are
common to America and to all of the
allies. The fourth common interest
concerns only the United States and+
England. These two nations control
all North America. Territorially, Eng-
land is as much an American power+
as the United States. Our Monroe'
doctrine was announced at England's
suggestion, and on the whole it has
been strongly supported by England-
a support which was not in the slight-;
est degree affected by two or three'
small quarrels that we have had with.
England over boundaries and other
minor matters. For a hundred years
the British navy has been ready to
help us prevent Russia, Germany or
any other power from getting a foot-'
hold on this side of the water; and
during all that time we were ready
to resist any similar effort to con-
quer British territory in or near North
America.
Our common interests with the al-
lies, therefore, are few but very clear
and vitally important. They are not
reasons of sentiment, but reasons of
business, of security, of self-preserva-
tion.
The next article in this series will
treat of the dangers that are common
to America and to the allies.
KAISER BILL COMPLIMENTS
MERMAN HIGH SEAS FLEET
Amsterdam, May 31.-Kaiser Wil-
helm played a glowing eulogy today to
the German high seas fleet, commem-
orating the anniversary of Skagerrak,
naval battle. Admiral Scheer was
specifically complimented, and with
members of his fleet given special dec-
oration. The fleet was complimented
upon its "continuously successful ac-
tivity."

CONDITIONS IN GERMANY
TOLD BYMRSREDMAN
DETROIT WOMAN ADDRESSES WO-
MEN'S LEAGUE FOR CON
STRUCTIVE SERVICE
Some facts about the conditions in
Germany during the last three years
of the war were told by Mrs. M. L.
Redman of Detroit, in an informal
talk before the Women's league for
constructive service, which met yes-
terday in Newberry hall. Mrs. Redman'
spoke from personal knowledge, hav-
ing lived in Berlin from the springt
of 1914 until August, 1916. .
When the news of the assassination
of the Austrian crown prince, Charles
Joseph, flashed into print, an omin-
ous hush overspread the entire city'
of Berlin, according to Mrs. Redman.
"We Americans do not realize what
the assassination of a member of roy-
alty means in Europe," the sepaker
continued, "but the Germans felt in-
stinctively that the lowering war
clouds would have to break. The army
was quietly mobilized, and the grim
business of war )bas begun.
Use Bread Cards After First Year,
"The distribution of bread cards was
begun at the end of the first year
of the war," said Mrs. Redman, "and
soon butter cards, appeared. Meat
products were gradually restricted.
and the potato ration cut down to five
pounds a person for ten days. The
government regulated all prices, and
the cost of living was fixed at a uni-
form minimum all over Germany."
One of the causes of greatest suf-
fering among the civilians of Ger-
many according to the speaker, is
the lack of fats, which causes the hair
to fall out, the skin to dry, and tub-
erculosis to set in. Due to the scar-
city of food, nine infants out of every
10 die, or are killed by half-crazed
mgthers.
Women Fill Men's Places
"Women in Germany have assumed
the places of the men just as
France and England, and do their
work with characteristic efficiency,"
said Mrs. Redman, "even to the build-
ing of subways."
When asked what is the general
sentiment of the people regarding the
war, she replied that all Europeans,
except the few belonging to the war
party, are unanimous in the desire
to have the war stopped at almost any
price. French and English prisoners

display great joy at being able to get
out of the fight for a time. They are
kindly treated by the Germans and
well paid.
"Among the most horrible aspects
of the war," said Mrs. Redman, "are
the mental and moral wrecks, and the
incurable diseases due to the use of
gases, and liquid fire."
The socialist and conservative part-
ies are constantly growing accord-
ing to a statement made by Mrs.
Redman, and they hoped that by their
concerted action the war may be soon
brought to an end.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* *
* AT THE THEATERS *
* *
* TODAY
* _ _*
* Majestic - "E n l11lg It t e n Thy *
* Daughter." *
* *
* Arcade-Viola Dana in "God's *
Law and Man's." Also Drew *
* comedy.
* «*
Orpheum--Mouse Peters and *
* Myrtle Stedman in "As Men *
* Love.' Also Triangle comedy *
* and Paramount pictograph. *
* «*
Wuerth--William Desmond in *
* "Blood Will Tell." Also Key- *
* stone comedy, "Villa of the *
* Movies." *
* «*
Rue-Blanche Sweet in "The *
* Clue." Also. Mr. Jack com- *
* edy. *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

TECHNI ,C SUBSCRIPTION
EFFORTSEND TONIGHT
TWO TEAMS THAT CARRIED ON
CAMPAIGN WILL DINE AT
DELTA CAFE
At 6:30 o'clock this evening the sec-
ond annual subscription campaign, of
the Michigan Technic, official publica-
tion of the engineering college, will
be formally closed with a dinner at
the Delta cafe. Members of the en-
gineering faculty and the blue-tagged
campaigned workers will be present
to make final reports on the success
of the project.
The campaign for subscriptions is
held each year at this time among
those graduating from the engineer-
ing college, in an effort to establish
the Technic as a medium between
them and their Alma Mater.
Yesterday was faculty day and the
committees were highly pleased with
the generous response of the faculty
of their college. In the evening a
house-to-house canvass was made of
all senior engineers, who by joining
the engineering society receive "a
year's subscription to the Technic.

Due to the number of seniors who
have already left school, and to the
present uncertainty of affairs, the
campaigners do not expect to equal
last year's record of 100 subscriptions.
The two campaign teams are: R. H.
Earley, '18E, captain; M. R. Norcop,
'20E; A. E. Dyment, '20E; L. K. Fer-
ris, '19E; G. C. Dunn, '20E; W. C. Bab-
bitt, '19E; M. K. Ayers, '19E; R. M.
Woodward, '18E; F. I. Sheahan, '18E,
and H. J. Cotton, '20E, captain; A. F.
King, '20E; F. W. Parsons, '20E; L.
Cantor, '19E; J. T. Dickinson, '20E;
H. O. Trerice, '18E; C. A. Hart. '18E;
J. J. Kilmer, '18E; W. H. Dow, '19E.
VERNON CASTLE HAS PUPIL
KILLED IN AIR ACCIDENT
Toronto, Ont., May 31.-W. E. Frazer
of Winnipeg, Canadian aviator cadet,
was killed, and Lieutenant Vernon
Castle, dancing and aviation instruct-
or, miraculously escaped injury at the
aviation training grounds at Mohawk
camp, it became known today.
Castle and his pupil were just as-
cending for flight when something
went wrong with the engine and there
was an explosion. The machine fell
on a roof. The cadet was burned in
the aeroplane, but Castle was not bad-
ly hurt.
Banquets given particular attention.
Delta Cafe.-Adv.
Try The Daily for service.

Get
gatta
Adv.

your Canoe Lunch for the Re-
at the Delta. Phone 817-M.-
1-2

omm. mu

AT THE MAJESTIC

Our curtains are dis-
tincptive on workman-
ship, materials and
quality and made to
measure.

"Enlighten Thy Daughter," the
screen morality-drama at the Majestic
now is the story of two families with
different views of life and of distinct-
ly different temperaments. The
daughters of the two families form the
contrasting elements in the play, the
one being carefully brought up, the
other allowed to grow up in ignor-
ance.
The cast consists of Frank Sheridan,
Zena Keefe, James Morrison, Kather-
ine Kaelred, Marie Shotwell, Arthur
Donaldson, Violet Horner, and Rubye
De Remer.
Get your Canoe Lunch for the Re-
gatta at the Delta. Phone 817-M.-
Adv. 1-2

t ~iT

Pilbeam& Marz Co.
301 No. Main Street
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Phone 2380

720 Peter Smith
Bldg.
Detroit, Mich.

6404 Utica Ave.
Cleveland, Ohio

1

I' I

NEW MODERN HOUSES FOR SALE

Six rooms, sleeping porch, oak floors and finish, large lot, one block
off street car, five minutes west of Main St., cheap at $4000; 6 room
house on Vaughn St.. nearly new, finished in oak, with hardwood floors,
a very fine home one-half block off Packard St., price $4100 with
$1600 down; six room house on the west side, new and modern, price
$3000; another new house for a small family, 5 rooms and modern,
price $2350; a fine 7 room house on a good street, strictly modern, lot
40x132 feet, price $4200; house on the west side with large lot, room
for three more houses. a bargain at $3000.

A few lots In the Boulevard Gardens are yet for sale.

JOHN F. WAGNER
22 Ann Arbor Savings Bank Bldg.

D. S. McCOMB
Phone 1027-J

MILLEN'S JUNE WHITE SALEI

Welcome as the June Roses !

49c Sale Night Gowns, Corset Covers, Drawers, Muslin
Petticoats.
75c Sale Night Gowns, Skirts and Drawers.
98c Sale Dainty Envelope Chemises, Night Gowns, White
Petticoats.
300 Yards Curtain Scrim, values up to 20c, Sale 9c.
The New Nemo Corsets-The June Special $2.00.
Women's Silk Gloves 69c.

... .~
I

VISIT THE SECOND FLOOR DUR-
ING THIS SALE
Choose from Spring Suits worth up to $25.00,
Saturday for ..................$15.00
Choose from New Spring Coats worth up to
$20.00. Saturday for ...........$10.00

300 White Voile Waists, values up to $2.00, at.........98c
BUY NOW, THIS SALE IS FOR YOU

I AS.

S. A ILLEN

THE BUSY STORE

P7!

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