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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 30, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-30

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,11

UL

& 'IA-'

GH morale and neat appearance are
nseperable - in business and profess
onal life as well as in the fighting
orce.
You men who control the destiny- of
ndustrial America will find the qaal-
ties you need-the snap of youth, the
ignity of age, the refinement of ex-
>erience and the acme of value-best
:xpressed in
mart othes

WAR STIMULATES U. S.
MANUFACTURE OF DRUGS
PROF. H. KRAEMER SAYS COUNTRY
HAS ABUNDANT SUPPLY
OF DIGITALIS

BRIlISH RULE IMPROTES
PALESTINIANCONDITIONS
GENERAL ALLENBY ESTABLISHES
RELIGIOUS TOLERATION
FOR ALL SECTS

Early Spring Showing

.

Society Brand and
Hickey-Freeman Suits

ENSCHIM IT &APEEL & C

s

WE R'S

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7 i rl 1 '^..-' r .
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Cr 3 l ...-.
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21S E. LIBERTY

ANN ARBOR GARAGE
DEALERS IN
lUB BRTHERS

MOTOR EAR.

4
/

PHONE 1101

" ,....

777-"'7

CASCO - 2/3 In.
CLYDE-- 21/8 in.

CA O LL . S
FOR SPRING
Cluett,Peabod/ (3 CaInc. AVakers
The Literary Critic Says
[CKY VAN," by Carolyn Wells, J. B.
ippincott company, Philadelphia.
arolyn Wells has one predominant
racteristic, the ability to be startl-.
She seems to have attained to
height of this in "Vicky Van,"
ich is a surprising story of a double
sonality. Its best feature is a
.racter portrayal, which, in a novel
such nature, must of necessity be
ellently done in order to be any-
ig but a complete failure. She has
ceeded in this, and her Vicky Van

and Ruth Somers are very cleverly
drawn.
But it seems too bad that MissI
Wells should rate her ability so low
as to waste it on a novel of this type.
She can be clever, and she has proved
it, but she seems to have forgotten
that in the writing of "Vicky VanK she
has devoted her attention to the un-
winding of a much-knotted thread, and
she has done so very creditably, but.
she has permitted herself to wade in
the mud of the yellow-covered detec-
tive story. The book is melodramatic
and overdrawn, and certainly not a
credit to its brilliant author.
F. B. DEVINE IS CANDIDATE
FOR PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
Frank B. DeVine announced yester-
day that he had decided to become a
candidate for the republican nomina-
tion for county prosecuting attorney
in the primaries. He acknowledged
that;,he had been contemplating this
decision for some time, having been
persuaded recently to do so by a
number of his friends.
DeVine is one of the. prominent at-
torneys of the city, and has secured
this prominence because of his con-
nection with city affairs in the cap-
acity of city attorney. He has been
successful in connection with the
Steere farm water cases, in which the
city was successful.

That the Germans made a mistake
when they believed the war would
handicap or inconvenience this coun-!
try in regard to drugs, is the state-
made by Prof. Henry Kraemer, of the
pharmacognosy department. America
did not engage in the manufacture of
drugs for several reasons, he says, one
of them being that it would have meant
a big investment in a lot of little
things.
Importance of Drugs Realized
"Since the war, however," continues
Dr. Kraemer, "we have come to real-
ize the importance of making our
drugs ourselves. German manufac-
turers have had all the special priv-
ileges for their manufacture, due to
inadequate tariff protection and also
to the action of the patent office. But
congress has fully grasped the sit-
uation now, and will see to it that
henceforth American industries will be
encouraged.
Service Committee Assists
"Had it not been for the American
Drug Manufacturers' association,
which organized a war service commit-
tee that rendered prompt assistance
to the government when called upon,
the country would have suffered more
than once from unexpected delays in-
cident to the securing of certain
drugs, which were widely distributed
throughout the country in small quant-
ities among retailers. Manufacturers
of medical and surgical supplies also
offered their services to the country,
and greatly benefited the nation."
U. S. Has Quantities of Drugs
Many drugs which were formerly
imported from Europe, and which it
was thought could not be obtained
in this country, have been found in
great quantities and practically un-
touched," says Dr. Kraemer. He cites
the digitalis as an example.
Digitalis Abundant Here
"With the beginning of the war, the
nation's supply of digitalis, practically
all of which had been imported from
Germany, was shut off. It was a ca-
lamity. There is, however, a sufficient
amount of digitalis growing wild in
the western part of the state of Wash-
ington to supply several times over the
entire demand for this drug in the
United States. It is abundant, too, in
Oregon and British Columbia. Be-
fore the war this digitalis was-. allow-
ed to go to waste, and practically all
that was used was imported. Since
last fall there has been received at
the University of Washington alone
approximately 1,200 pounds of dried
digitalis leaves, collected by patriotic
organizations in Washington, and do-
nated for use in army medical sup-
plies.
New Jersey Grows Licorice
This Is only one example in which
the United States is coming into her
own in the procuring and manufactur-
ing of drugs," concludes Prof. Kraem-
er. "The growing of licorice in this
country is another important step.
Formerly all the licorice was import-
ed from Russia and Spain. It has been
found that it can be grown just as
well in the state of New Jersey. The
castor oil industry, also, is rapidly
being developed in Texas and Florida,
and the government has discovered
that the oil makes a good lubricator
for airplanes using a rotary motor.
D. Kraemer predicts that the drug
industry will be a very important one
in the United States in a few years,
and that America will discover other
natural resources just as profitable.
UNITED STATES HAS 27 CITIES
NAMED BERLIN; FOUR IN OHIO
The United States is dotted with
Berlins, says Capper's Weekly, there
being 27 towns of that name in the
country. Four of them are in Ohio
alone.

Besides these, there are 20 Ham-
'burgs, 8 Bremens, 11 Dresdens, 22
Hanovers, and Wisconsin and Mos-
souri each have a Kaiser. But evi-
dently few people care to live in these
two towns because their populations
are so small that they are not listed.
The Daily's specialty is service to
every one. Let us serve you.-Adv.

London, April 2.-(Correspondence of
' The Associated Press)-Conditions in
Palestine today are In marvelous con-
trast with those which prevailed be-
fore the British General Allenby set
up a military administration in Jeru-
salem, writes an American resident
of that country to The Associated
Press. The correspondent adds:
Religious Tolerition Established
"The removal of the old Ottoman
regime which had for its primary ob
ject the setting of one class against
another, the complete respect for the
feelings and rights of all religious sects,
the establishment of really equitable
judicial tribunals, and the excellent
behavior of the British troops, have
already had a marked effect, not only
on the people of the towns but also
on the wild nomad Bedouin. All
through the liberated districts the
British authorities have been afforded
every possible assistance by the peo-
ple, and the British methods of deal-
ing with thorny religious questions are
in general approved by the various
religious communities.
Moslems Hospitable
"The Moslems have shown an excel-
lent spirit. Recently the Military
Governor of Mejdel was invited to at-
tend a religious ceremony by the
Mohammedan notables of the town,-
a great concession. In another case,
a party of troops sent to collect arms
from a village near Hebron was in-
vited to take shelter from the cold
of a rainy night in the village mosque.
This was a remarkable piece of hos-
pitality.
"On all sides, in short, it i evident
that the new administration is re-
garded as a great relief after the tyr-
annous corruption of the Turk. The
British tribunal established in the
sacred city of Bethlehem, for exam-
ple, is giving general satisfaction, and
has the support and backing of the
notables and headmen. People who
have always endured injustice rather
than submit themselves to the cor-
rupt Turkish courts are now freely
availing themselves of the new tribu-
nal.
Oppose Turkish Rule
"In the Mejdel area, the local chiefs,
in a petition urging that the British
employ no former Turkish officials in
their administration, said: "The Brit-
ish administration is like a sword, but
it is straight, has a true edge and is
no respector of persons.'
"The population of the grain-pro-
ducing country between Gaza and
Beersheba is delighted at the promise
of prosperity which they see in the
linking up by railway of Palestine and
Egypt, which affords them a perma-
nent market for their produce."
G. P. c)MAHON, '18L, SPEAKS
ON EXPERIENCES IN FRANCE
George P. McMahon, '18L, delivered
an address on the subject "The Church
of the Future," at a meeting of the
Plymouth Round Table, of the First
Congregational church, Sunday even-
ing.. His speech was founded upon his
experiences with the Y. M. C. A. in
France, together with his impressions
and convictions as a result of those
experiences.
McMahon went to ,France with the
first Y. M. C. A. workers, and had
charge of the Y. M. C. A. hut even
before the hut was built. He landed
in France in last July 4. He had '
charge of the first Y. M. C. A. hut]
which was erected at the principal
port of entry and army camp, and re-
mained until November, when he re-
turned to Ann Arbor. He plans to en-
list after graduation for service in the
army.
Lieut. Williams, '14E, Dies In France

Lieut. Charles S. Williams, '14E,
killed in an airplane accident in France,l
is the first Owosso man to die in ser-
vice. He was employed in Detroit
when he went to the first officers'
training camp at Fort Sheridan. He
transferred to aviation and sailed in"
January.
His mother, who survives, is in
California.

Also just received a line-of Spring Hats and Caps

Your Spring Suit

Will gieyu at well-od essed appearance
if made by
A, FM ARQU./ ARDT & CO.

1002 S.
Cousins & Hall UNWV.AVE.
Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association
YOUR SPRING SUIT
will be carefully tailored of the new de-
pendable fabrics.
New Models distinctly our own.

JFW FhL.

Between the Theatres

FOR FLOWERS
of every description

STYLES OF THE NEWEST DESIGNS
FABRICS OF THE FINEST QUALITY
OFFICE S' UNIFORMS

GOLF SUITS

RIDING BREECHES

516 E. William St.

Phone 1922-j

See

6 Fi J

D. E. Gre
The Custom Tailor 606 E. Libert

FRATERNITIES

Arrange for Your

GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS

Unsurpassed Accommodations

PHONE 948-W

619 E. LIBERTY

re Copy
at
r's and
I Delta

L/ERTIS ING

Leave CopY
at
Students'
Supply Store'

LOST
ST- Friday, Waltham open face
,ilver watch. Last seen on table in
)ren's Cafeteria, South University.
leturr to W. A. McLaughlin, 315'
4lm St.
ST-Pair of Champagne Slippers on
Aberty St., Friday night. Reward.
3ox G, Daily.
ST-Belt for overcoat. Vicinity of
?ackard Academy. Finder please
all 906.
ST-Will the party who called Har-
Id F. Robinson about his slide rule,
lease call again and leave his

WAJTID
WANTED-Refined young lady during
summer Vacation for educational.
work. $225.00 for 3 months. Phone
359-M.
WANTED- Curtains, table linen or
any kind of fiat work to launder.
Phone 1163-J.
WANTED-Pre-Festival coupon cov-
er. Call 468-M.
,03 BALEa
FOR SALE-Cheap-An 18 foot canoe
with paddles and in fine condition.
Used one season. Storage paid up to
May 15. Can 'be seen at Saunder's
Canoe Livery.
FOR SALE-One May Festival cover
coupon. Call 2118-M.

It 's A Gay Life
If You Hold Out
Do you think you can be a soldier?
Then listen to what the men at Camp
Logan, Houston, Tex., have to be able
to do.
They must be able to take a pint
of -water, a square foot of wood, one,
and only one, match, a knife and in
ten minutes dig a fire pit and have
a fire going in any kind of weather.
.They must also be able to run 100
yards in 20 seconds with a 60 pound
pack, including a gun, stripped to their
backs; be able to chin themselves 15
times; scale a 5 foot wall three times
in succession; place a 100 pound
weight on a 6 foot wall; and climb
a 20 foot rope in 20 seconds.
These are only some of the minor
requirements at Camp Logan. Every
foot soldier must be able to do all of!
them, and a lot more, or he is not on-
sidered efficient. It is said that every
prairie divisioner who came to this
camp with his regiment last summer
is able to do all the stunts required
of him.
It's a great life, if you don't weaken.
Our Merchant Advertisers represent
the progressive business men of Ann
Arbor.-Adv.
Patronize a Daily Advertiser once
and you will patronize him again.,

Saturday, May 11, at 11 a. m. in the
office of the Chairman of the Board
in West Hall, for the purpose of choos-
ing a business manager and managing
editor for the following publications:
The Michigan Daily, The Gargoyle,
The Inlander, The Michiganensian,
The Students' Directory, and The Ath-
letic Program. It is the policy of the
Board in filling the positions on -the
publications under its control, to
award them on the basis of merit to
those who have served in minor pos-
itions on 'the publications to which
the positions pertain.
It sometimes happens, however, that
no one who has served on the pub-
lications during the year is eligible
or capable, of filling one of the lead-
ing positions for the ensuing year.
When such circumstances arise, the
board finds it necessary to consider
outside candidates. This notice should
not -be considered; as an intimation
that these circumstances will arise
this year.
All applications for these positions
should be in the hands of Professor
F. N. Scott, on or before May 8, in
order to be considered. Each ap'plica-
tion should contain a statement of
the experience of the applicant and
should be accompanied by any let-
ter of recommendation which he
may have.
BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT
PUBLICATIONS.

NO
The Board in
Publications will

)TICE
Control of S
hold a meet

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger, and many other makes.
The world's famous Pianola Player Pianos, Victor
Victrolas. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
GRINNELL BROS.,' 116 S. M ast.

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