100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 30, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SING

ecutives- of an advanced nature. While the
anch man- actuarial and mathematical phases of
1 superin- insurance are primarily emphasized,
nployment the training thus secured frequently
in charge leads to secretarial, managerial and
iese posts executive posts. There is a large de-
particular- mand for students, both men and wo-
important men, adequately trained in the field
I the stu- of actuarial mathematics, and there
has been are unusual opportunities for advance-
s of prac- ment.

cap-

the

University Training Demanded .
The demand for university training
in business administration has come
very largely from the business com-
munity; even our so-called slf-made
men are now realizing that the busi-
ness leadership of the future will rest
in the hands of men who have re-
ceived systematic professional train-
ing and enjoy a broad cultural back-
ground. Men possessing such training
and background generally make more
rapid progress than their fellows who
have been compelled - to rely solely
on actual experience, and there is
practically no limit to the possibilities
for advancement. Modern business is
in the process. of readjustment. It
must- gain in productive efficiency, and
it must harmonize the acquisition of
private rights with the development
of public welfare. Its greatest need
is for men-for men of natural capac-
ity, of adequate training, of keen vis-
ion, of constructive imagination, of
social outlook, of public spirit. An un-
limited future awaits the business ad-
justments now in ferment; and unlim-
ited opportunities lie ahead in the
business world for men of brain, of
action, and of character.

Graduates of several ordnance cour-
ses in the University are now train-
ing at Camp Hancock, Augusta, Ga.,
according to information received
here. The apparent reason for the
discontinuance of the various school
and arsenal classes is to concentrate
all such classes at one camp, and in
the future, all ordnance men in the
army will receive instruction at Camp
Hancock, where a large ordnance
training camp has been constructed.
More than 20,000 ordnance men will
t ain in this school.
There are many men who took the
ordnance courses in the University
at the camp. Recently, those who
took the fifth course at the Univer-
sity have been stationed at Camp Han-
cock, where they were ordered at
the completion of their work at the
arsenal. They were transferred to
this camp from Camp Jackson.
Instructors at the arsenal who have
been tranferred to Camp Hancock for
the new school are enthusiastic over
the plan for the large school, and be-
lieve more will be accomplished in
this manner than by courses conduc-
ted at the various universities and
arsenals over the country.

rolling officer for this
United States public
'Men of 21 years and
roll in the latter.
Under the public
men may enroll for
the coming summer.

and also for the
service reserve.
beyond may en-
service reserve,
shipbuilding for
Under both this

Men up to 21 years of age may en-
roll at the Union, beginning Monday,
May 6, in the United States boys'
working reserve, for work during the
summer. Frank Bacon, '02, is the en-

I ~~-lm

and the boys working, reserve, stu-
dents may enlist for farm work dur-
ing vacation.
Watch The Daily Classified column.
MJESTIC
T HE A TER

Tues-30-Vio
(Ret.) and
Wed- i - mni
Game." (
toon, '"i
Screed Te
Splcndid
-0
It

CO MINC

Thursday- Friday
Saturday
May 9, 10, 11

to gain
i the in-
. domes-
nelusion

give

ons, in or-
Ily pursue
r of allied
value of
fields has
y financial
he Nation-
iproviding
the train-
hese lines
confidence
in the sup-
d men in
mns of bus-
ge respon-
ning avail-
necessary
[nistration
administra-
mts to en-
,rtments of
of federal
ins, and to
id anrais-

FORESTERS PLAN
ANNUAL FIELD DAY
Forestry students will go to the
forestry farm this week end for their
annual camping trip and field day.
The party will leave the Natural
science building at 12:30 o'clock Fri-
day, all supplies and equipment pre-
ceeding them by motor truck.
Field day will be held on Saturday,
and guests are invited to witness the
contests and look over the farm.
Events will consist of a base ball
game between the freshmen and sopho-
mores, and the juniors and seniors.
Besides the games, and chopping and
sawing contests, demonstrations of
packing a horse, paddling a canoe,
heliograph signaling, and the use of
field telephones will be shown. The
two latter demonstrations will be
given under the direction of Prof. P.
S. Lovejoy.
Saturday evening will be taken up
in singing and in informal talks by
the professors in charge, and camp
will be broken Sunday afternoon.

* * * *
*AT T
*
*
*
"Lord
* Garrick.
*
*
*
* Majest
Heart of
* Wuert
* ria in "T
* Eagle's F
Orpheu
* "Barbary
Eve.
* Arcade
* Jeans."
s

HE THEATERS

and Lady Algy," at the

* * * * * * *

a
*i
r-
*

TODAY

ic-June Caprice in
f Romance."

"The *

of P
rac}.

II

h-Maciste, hero of Cabi-
The Warrior." Also, "The
Eye."
jn -- Elsie Ferguson in
y Sheep." Also Eagle's

*
*-
*
*
x:
,:

!

Eue

le,-Viola Dana in
Also Pathe News.

"Blue *
*

BOOKINGS F
Tues-30--Elsie F
Sheep." Also
(Ret.)
Wed-Mav i-Do
"Man f:rom Pa
"ragle Eye," Nc
'11 urs-ri--2-3-Pa
nocent's Progrc

* 04 * * * ,* * * * * * * I~

AT THE MAJESTIC

1 or vocational as-
Iministration. While Engineers to Hold Yellow Button Ball
unt of actual exper-
for the attainment "Yellow Button Ball" is the name'
)nsible posts in the of the second freshman engineer dance
ping in fundament- of the season, to be held at 8:30 next
vided in the univer- Friday night in Barbour gymnasium.
railway economics, Ike Fisher will furnish the music
on, operation, and and refreshments are promised by the
timing almnost indis- committee in. charge. Tickets at 50
seeking a career in cents a couple are on sale at the Busy
portant transporta- Bee.
in connection with
._, __ ____ __ (lr Mrnh~t A'ctrticrc ~nra~wt

rance is de-
intend to en-
ion, either in

uur merenant Advetisers represent
the progressive business men of Ann
Arbor.-Adv.
Patronize our advertisers.-Adv.

I

!__

Lunches

Did you ever watch a musical come-
dy, with its two-score of chorus girls,
in rehearsal? It is just as interest-
ing as it sounds. Several scenes in this
activity are incorporated in "The
Heart of Romance," in which June Cap-
rice is appearing at the Majestic to-
day.
To make certain of obtaining an
absolutely correct atmosphere, Harry
Millarde, who directed this William
Fox. feature engaged real chorus
girl-members of one of the best known
burlesque houses in New, York City.
He succeeded, to an amazing degree,
in bringing to the screen the excite-
ment and the hustle of the modern
play rehearsal. The stage, upon
which the girls are seen practicing
their steps and songs, is a setting
built at the Fox studio.
W. A. EWING, '64-'68M, HEAD
OF BELLE VUE HOSPITAL DIES
Word has been received here of the
death of William Alexander Ewing,
'64-'68M. Dr. Ewing was born at
Dexter, and entered the literary de-
partment six months before the out-
break of the Civil war. He was gra-
duated in 1864 with the degree of A.B.
and received his doctor's degree four
years later.
Upon graduation, Dr. Ewing enter-
ed service at the Bellevue hospital
in New York, and at the time of his
death was in complete charge of the
institution. He was also in the em-
ploy of the corporation operating the
elevated and surface lines of the city,
his arl!c? . -i. ig sght i inc adjst-
Idcnt of damage suits.
Dr. Ewing is survived by his son,
Dr. Thomas Ewing, who for many
years has been a prominent physician
of California.
HAWAIIAN PAPERS PRAISE
PROF. TRUEBLOOD'S READINGS
Hawaiian newspapers are commend-
ing very highly the recitals from Mark
Twain's works which Professor -C.
Trueblood, of the department of ora-
tory, has been giving recently in var-
ious cities throughout the Islands.
The Maui News states that Professor
Trueblood was received with over-
flowing houses and that heads of the
universities where he spolre paid him

-- ill--

'The Heart of

MAJELSnTI

A story of a rich girl and a
poor young man.

Seats on Sale
Saturday May 4

-Also -

"Wild Algy of
Comedy

THE SUNSHIN

JUNE C.

I

SHOWS - 3:00 7:00 8
20c = - Includinu 2c

YI1

Ir.
IO

-----

I

r1

TUESDAY and

Oi

6C

Be Ce

See "C
~St

great compliments.
blood is on his way
tralia where he has
antipodal summer.

Professor True-
back from Aus-
been during the

U

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan