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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 05, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUE

MIBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
sociated Press is exclusively entitle
e fr republication of all news dis-
tedie d to it ortnot otherwise credit-
is paper and also the local news
hterei.
newspaper atthe University of
Publlised everymorning .except
durng the univrsity year.
d at the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
as8 matter.
Ann Arbor Press Building.
Business. 96o Editorial, 2414.
nications not to exceed 300 word
tor ntices of "evets will be pub-
The Daily, at the discretion of the
left at the office in the Ann Arbor
1g., or in the notice box in the west
ethe general library, where the
are 'collected at '^:3 e ''cock each
McDonald. Managing Editor
Emery...": ....Business :Manager
rth Robisn.Acting Business Mgr.
tor ..............C. S. Clark, Jr.
r ...........Herbert G. Wilson
litor....James Schermerhorn, Jr.
LEIditor.........Brte A Swaney
Editor ........Mildred C. Mighell
Editor .........Margaret H. Cooley
akinson.......Advertising Manager
Cholette.......Publication Manager
woh.........Circulation Manager
. Smnith........CreditManager
NIGHT EDITORS
Barnes C. M. Campbell
s. Jr. W. R. Atlas
C. Roeser Mark K. Ehibert
REPORTERS .
lpine Paul A. Shinkman
din x HoraceE. Hunter
V. Fox Rilla A. Nelson
. Patterson Iilip Slomovitz
th *Frances Broene
rden Ida E. Mines
M~. Price Samuel Lamport
PnceEdgar L. Rice
Sergeant H David B. Landis
K.Frances Handbo
BUSINESS .STAFF
Ieitinger Harry D. Hause
ress L. A. Storrer
ttle Katherine Kilpatrick
-isten Agnes Abele
miedeskamp Frances II Macdonald
Cadwell, Jr. Francis I. Case
ESDAY, MARCH 5, 1918.
i Editor-Philip Slomovitz
lg of news staff and try-outs
in reportorial rooms
[GAN'S NINE MAN TRACK
TEAM
;an scored more points in the
fnnual relay carnival at Illin-
any oter Conference team.
ame time the basketball team
fourth game of the season by
g M. A. C. Saturday appears
surface to have been one of
i's biggest days of the year in
n thank nine men for our vic-
Urbana. But that is not the
aificance of the meet. Mich-
6 of the largest schools of the
ce, was without teams in the,
d four-mile relays, and the
s. Coach Farrell entered no
because he had no material
His nine men couldn't go
the events and expect to plac4
may be no solution to the
ificulty this year. What ma-
out may be all that Mich-
atains equal to the task of
g points in fast competition.
'arrell is willing to commence
future teams now. If more
thletes .had presented them-
ast year Michigan would have
an a nine man team. today.
MAGAZINES WE READ"
this caption the Ohio State
ifrquires:
it the girl with the big
r fan, on the cover, or the
of contents in a less pictur-
book which you buy?"
are, in short, the two types
,zines which confront readers
present time. Perhaps both
e necessary to students. The
ajority, we are told, first read

er kind, and if they have suf-
me, turn to the latter.
'ar has given us an opportun-
a high type of reading which
tot be overlooked by him who
become thoroughly informed
e moves on the international
board. To understand the
nce of the Bolsheviki, the war
the financial conditions of
gerents, and the hundred oth-
-d essentials back of thg fight-
Europe, and the changes of
and action in this country,.
merge from views of narrow-
is necessary to read thorough-
est grade magazines, and oth-
eations of recognized repute.
ime that students as a whole
grasp the words our leading
s have been advocating for
nd read America's and the
leading writers.

so well at Illinois perhaps the student
body will sit back and think the world
,is all right again. Remember that
\basketball game last Friday. We have
,nother Saturday night.
Uncle Sam picked up his paper yes-
terday, saw that the Bolsheviki had
,signed a treaty of peace with the kais-
er, bit the end off his cigar and showed
something of a wan smile. That wan
smile is dangerous to Germany. Watch
it -
A boy, seven years old, is dead in
Minnesota from drinking brandy. Ac-
cording to our knowledge it doesn't
usually catch them so early.
The overall is again coming into its
(own. Women are to work on the
farms this spring says Mrs. Caroline
,Bartlett Crane.
Our bet is that T. R.'s deafness in
one ear won't affect his throat in the
slightest.
Are the freshmen going to wear
their pots with the uniforms?
CARYATIIJ
There's One man
In this Town.
Who thinks that
His Mouth is a Furnace
Of Unlimited capacity,
And that his Silverware
Are Implements
With which to Stoke it.
He Sticks
His Elbows
In Other peoples' Eyes,
And lays
His Knife
Down on the Table
And gets all Sticky.
Then he
Leaves the Dining Room
Chewing.
When we Die
And go Somewhere,
I Want.
To get There First
So that I can
Pick Out a Place where
I won't Have to watch him
Eat.
That's ALL I hope.
And now Masques has to go and
rub in with a play called "Amazons."
,e's been there and stayed all night.
A Grand Rapids man has suggested
the following names for Pullman
sleepers: (1) Insomnia, (2) Peram-
bula, (3) and Somnambula.
From the Oberlin Review-"Ladies'
and Gentlemen's Shoes Shined and
Massaged." Regular rub-down.
Did you ever hear that-
Mary had a Thomas-cat
Which warbled like Caruso.
A neighbor swung a base-ball bat;
Now Thomas doesn't do so.
Visions of Hell-Having people in-
formed that you've been plucked be-
fore you get a chance to pull the my-
cquntrys-call stall.
Ain't it a grrand and glor-yus feel-
ing - to win a basket-ball game?
Ring Lardner, after getting acclim-
ated to French hotels, hates to take
the morning plunge. As long as the
mud-fountain continues to play in our
lavatorium, Ring has nothing on us.
Talk of last laughs! Could you in
your wildest dreams four years (or

four months) ago, picture Turkey
helping herself to a nice large slice of
Russia?
But then, look at the opera.
ATHENA LITERARY SOCIETY
HOLDS REGULAR MEETING
The Athena literary society met last
night in its temporary quarters in
Barbour gymnasium. Elaine H. Tap-
pan, '19, was elected as vice-presi-I
dent to succeed Victoria Adams,'19.
After the regular business meet-
ing Vera Andrus, '19, was called upon
for an impromptu speech. She respond-
ed with an interesting account of her
impressions of Mrs. Beatrice Forbes-
Robertson Hale.
The membership committee decided
to open enrollment to the University
women interested.
Ruth E. Huston, '18, conducted par-
liamentary drill. Ida Esther Mines,
'20, acted as critic for the meeting.

WILL TO VICTORY
INVOLVED IN WAR
By Senator Robert L. Owen
The great war is a war of ma-
chinery, of engineering, of mechanical
,skill, of commerce, of industry, of
transportation, of organized military
And naval strategy.
But it involves also pyschological
forces of enormous import, the will to
victory, the will to righteousness, to
liberty, to humanity and justice.
It is a war between good and evil.
it is a war led by those, on the one
side, who glorify war, who teach that
might makes right; that there is no
national morality; that God is the
patron saint of robbery, of lust and
triumphant vice, and against those
whobelieve the contrary of all these
things against those who believe that
God is a spiritand they who worship
Him must' worship Him in spirit and
in truth; against those who believe in
righteousness a-nd justice, 'humanity
and mercy in the relations between
nations.
The United States is waging war
from a material standpoint, with every
energy possible to a highly intelligent,
patriotic, and industrial people led by
experts in the art of war, should wage
war also from the spiritual side. They
should make known their purposes to
all the world, the high and honorabe
intent with which America enters this
war, that America enters the war as
the champion of Liberty, of interna-
tional morality, of international hu-
manity, justice and mercy. That the
United States desires that every na-
tion should have its territorial integ-
rity. its right of internal development
guaranteed, that every nation should
have access to the sea and its undis-
puted rights on the sea. That Amer-
ica desires each of the various peo-
pIes having a common language, blood
and tradition, to have the right, un-
afraid, of governing themselves and
in developing their own character and
genius. That we should have there-
fore, a great concert of nations assur-
ing these rights by world federation.
When these ideas are given suflcient
publicity through Russia it will give
new courage to. the Russian people,
and they will no longer believe the
German propaganda, that the allies
have entered the war against Germany
for selfish purposes.
Disorganized opinion in Italy would
be brought up to a high standaro of
patriotic fervor.
The .pinion in Austria and Jrmany
will n lorer in the same degree fol-
low the leadership of autocracy c.r a
leader.hip which has continually mis-
led the lteple by false charges against
the United States, Fran.,e aed Great
Britain.
CHILDRENS' CONSERVATION
CAMPAIGN STARTS APRIL 6
Michigan has been requested to
save the lives of 2,800 babies during
Children's year which will be inaug-
urated by the Children's Bureau of
the department of labor on April 6,
the first anniversary of America's en-

Women
Tryouts for the "Amazons" will be
held from 3:30 to 5:30 o'clock this
afternoon in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall.
Girls' Glee club will practice at
4:30 o'clock this afternoon in Bar-
bour gymnasium.

A FEW TITLES OF THE
Best New Books
First Call-Arthur Guy Empey............................$1.50
A Yankee in the Trenches-Holmes .............................$1.35
How to Live at the Front-MacQuarrie ................... .. $1.25
In Our First Year of War-Woodrow Wilson....................$1.00
On the Field of Honor-Hughes Le Roux............. .......$1.50
The Bolsheviki and World Peace-Trotzky..................$1.50
Liberty Writings of Dr. Hermann Kiefer, edited by W. W. Florer.$2.50
My War Diary-Waddington. .................. . ...$1.50
Food in War Time-Graham Lusk................ ..........50c

Mrs. J. E. Beal, 343 South Fifth
avenue, Dr. Eloise Walker, 908 Mon-
roe street, Mrs. C. P. Wagner,* 900
Lincoln avenue, and Miss Grace
Greenwood, Martha Cook building,
will be at home to college women from
4 to 6 o'clock this afternoon.
Stylus will meet at 7:30 o'clock to-
night with Katherine Harrington, '18,
1016 Olivia avenue.
Seniors may pay their class dues
from 1 to 5 o'clock this afternoon
in University hall.
Geneva club will meet at 7:30
oclock tonight at the Alpha Chi Om-
ega house.
Women can get purchase slips for
the opera seat sale at 10 o'clock to-
morrow morning at Barbour gym-
nasium. The seats will be sold from
2 to 5 o'clock Friday afternoon at the
Hill auditorium box office.
WO OL SHORTAGE
DUE TO GAY YARNS
"If women and girls would refrain
from making bright colored sweaters
for themselves, there would be no
more demand for these wools and the
merchants, instead of buying pinks
and blues and lavenders, would be
able to purchase more khaki and grey
for our fighting men,"' is the opinion
of Mrs. W. H. Wait, state regent of
the D. A. R.
The D. A. R. firmly believe that this
fact has not been brought home
strongly enough to the women of Am-
erica. At a meeting in Washington
last week a vigorous campaign was
started to spread the knowledge all
through the nation.
American women are not intention-
ally unpatriotic in this regard, but a
lack of thought rather than of loy-
alty is responsible for their contin-
uing to make colored sweaters for
themselves despite the lack of wool
necessary for-war work.
"The time will come," declared Mrs
Wait, "when to own more than- one
sweater will be unpatriotic because
every woman will ; want to free as
much wool as possible for the men
in service." {
Mrs. Wait has samples of a new
wool fabric intended as a substitute
for yarn. It lacks the elasticity of the
knitted product, but is entirely sat-
isfactory for use by persons not en-
gaged in military service.
WOMEN'S POSITIONS FILLED
IN ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT

Wahr's Bookstores
MAIN STREET STATE STREET
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN
TELEGRAPHY?
We can furnish you with Keys, Sounders, Buzzers,
Wire Batteries, Etc.
THE EBERBACH & SON COMPANY
200-204 E. Liberty Street

I,

- LW

TEXT B0 1 KS
New and Secondhand

Bought and Sold

Slater's Book Shop
Phone 430 336 S. State St.

Shoes repaired while you wait.
G. Andres, 222 S. State St.-Adv.

0.

Free Exhibition of Raemaeker's
Great War Cartoons, daily at James
Foster's House of Art.-Adv.
ISPRI NG STY LES

fi t
Har Scafner&Mr

DETROITr UNIT D LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jacks in
(1,ffective May 22, 1917)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-':35 a
n.. 8:to a. in., and hourly to 7:io p. M., 9:13
o. mn.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m npr
every two hours to 6:48 p. m.; to Laihng.
8:48 P. m.
Jackson Express Cars ,local sto~ we t of
An Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and evey two l'uurs
to ' :48 p. iM.
Local Cars East Bound- :35 a. in., 6.:40
a. M., 7:05 t. mn and every two hours to 7 -0
p. in., 8:o5 p. mn.. 9:o5 p. mn., io:;o p. rn
To Ypsilanti only, 9:20 a. m., :5o a m.,
2:05 k, mn, 6:o5 P. im, 9:43 p. tn, tiI ';;.,
120 a.m.. i:o a. m.. ;2o a. n. to saline,
change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-- 6:o5 ia t), 7;:4e
a. m.. 10:20 p. M.. 12:20 a. n.
We have both the inclination and
the equipment to furnish the
best in banking fervice
The Ann Arbor Savings Bankf
INCORPORATED 1869
Capital and Surplus $ 500,000 00
Resources . . . $4,000,00000
Northwest Corner Main and
Huron Streets
707 North University Avenue
IF IT'S ANYTHING
PHOTOGRAPHIC, ASK
SWAIN
113 East University

trance into the war. The women's committee of the
Every state in the Union has been Council of National Defense has an-
assigned a 'definite quota of lives to nounced that all positions open to
save, New York leading with 8,455. women in the ordnance department
With the assistance of the 5,000 have been filled.
local organizations of the Women's About the middle of January this
committee of the Council of National department offered office positions to
Defense, the children's bureau will 90 college women. Since this time
carry its child conservation campaign over 800 applications have been filed
into every community of the United and the positions will be filled by
States in an effort to prevent at least these applicants.
200,000 of the annual total of 300,000 Other girls wishing to take work of
preventable deaths of children under this kind can secure full information
five years of age. about opportunities for women by ap-
A national weighing and measuring plying directly to the civil service
test will be undertaken first as a sort commission, Washington, D. C.
of "stock taking" to afford a basis for
computing results at the end of the You will aiwaym find bargains t
year. Daily advertisements. Read them.
A

I

STOP AT
T UTTLES
338 MAYNARD
For Lunches and Sodas

I

I

I

I

TYPEWRITERS
For Sale and Rent
TYPEWRITING
Mimeographing
Fraternity and Social Stationery
'0. D. 3 ORRILL
322 South State Street
Your every Bank
ing need fulfilled at
Farmers & Mechanics Bank

Al

spring suits and top coats are
more snappy than ever this
spring; the kind of clothes red-
blooded young men will be
wearing. They have incorporat-
ed in them all the style tenden-
cies that will be popular.
We have bought freely and as
a consequence offer you choice
of a stock unequalled for rich-
ness of choice and variety of
style, anywhere but in their
shops. You will find here
clothes as good as you can -buy
in any city, and the price is
more reasonable.
New neckwear, Steson and
Knox Hats.

101-105 So. Main

330 So. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

AT ARMORY

FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1918
MUSIC

Try our
HOME-MADE
Candies
They are both delicious and
r Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
The SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 5. Main St.

","Doc" Wright
"Toni" Huss
"Cy" Darling
"Harry" Cook
;Johnny" Shwer

Piano
Violin
Banjorine
Saxophone
Drums

I

Rewle, Conlin, Fiegel & CO,
The Big Home of Hart Schaff-
ner and Marx Clothes, at South-
west Corner Main and Washing-
ton Streets.

-man track team doingI

I

I

a

lMeet Mo at"

mmm
Q i"i T

PIPES

GILBERTS
BEST PRICES and ASSORTMENT

to Fraternity House Stores

HOLDERS

- ~,93'u~uCONNOR' S IC

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