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March 05, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

LAL.
AV A6F
ANO

4:3att_

ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT 1
SERVICE

)L. XXVIII. No. 107.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1918.

PRICE

-_

THREE C

1 g

HUNS QUIT FIGHT
WITH BOLSHEYIKI,
SIGNPEACE PACT
TEUTONS DRIVE IN FINLAN TO
SECURE CENTRAL OF
HELSINGFORS
GERMANY CELEBRATES;
HOLIDAY FOR SCHOOLS
Contents of Treaty Not Made Public;
Fear Central Powers Took All
From Russia
(By Associated Press)
Amsterdam, March 4.-The German
press called the pact with Russia a
masterpiece. The German emperor's
telegram of congratulations to chan-
cellor von Hertling is placarded
throughout Berlin. Flags are flying
everywhere and the schools will have{
a holiday tomorrow.
March 4.-German forces have ceas-
ed operations in Great Russia, follow-
ing the signing of the peace pact with.
the Bolsheviki, accrding to scant ad-
vices that have found their way out1
of Petrograd. The Teutons are now

FRENCH PREMIER
DECORATES YANKS

With American army in France,
March 3. - (Delayed). - Clemenceau
who spent the day on the Americar
front northwest of Toul. decorated
two lieutenants, two sergeants, and
two privates with the war cross, for
heroism which they displayed in the
recent German raid in this sector.
Both men went into No Man's Land
in daylight and got a German pris-
oner.
Since Sunday the Germans have
lift the Americans in comparative
peace on their sector near Toul..Prob-
ably finding that their attempting at-
tacks mere too costly, they have failed
to launch further attacks, aid even
have cut down materially their artil-
lery fire and gas shell bombardments.
The American gunners have worked a
havoc among the German fire.
Australians Raid
Near Warnington, southeast of
Ypres, the Australians have carried
out a big raid against enemy positions,
killing at least 50 of the German de-
fenders, destroying dugouts and bring-
ing back prisoners. Around Lens the
Germans have begun a rather inten-
sive bombardment against the British
troops besieging the great coal center.
Verdun Sector Active
The nearest approach to a big bat-
tle on the western front has occurred
between the French and Germans in
the Verdun sector. Here the French
troops carried out a brilliant attack
against the Cologne sentries and pen-
etrated the German positions as far
as their fourth line. The force of
penetration was over a front of 1,200
meters, and to a depth of 600 meters.
More than 150 prisoners were taken in
the operation.
COMEDY CLB TO PRESENT
FARCE of MISS HOBBS"

.,
7
i
r
.
i'
i
t

-PROGRESS SHOWN.
IN WARPROGRAM
Major Bursley Lauds Administration
At Washington; Calls It
Successful
FORMER FACULTY MAN HERE
ON AN INSPECTION TOUR
Local Ordnance Graduates Hold High
Commissions; Several Transferred
To Engineering Corps

PLANS COMPLETED
FOR SUMMER CA9MP
Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors May
Take Military Course in Sum-
mer Session
COMPLETE UNIFORMS TO BE
GIVEN CADETS IN CAMP
Sildents Must Sign Up By Tomorrow
Noon; Signing of Contract
Required

"LET'S GO!" SEATS
PLACED ON SALE

That the administration's war pro-
gram is proceeding successfully and
that the inefficiencies heralded by

fighting against Finland, and in the
south the Austro-Hungarians are mak-
ing inroads into Podolia in an en-
deavor to drive out the Bolsheviki and
thus secure a hold on that section
which will be able to feed them.
Try to Reach Helsingfors
While apparently the German op-
erations in Finland have as their pur-
pose the expelling of the Finnish rev-
olutionists and the Bolsheviki Reds
from southern Finland, it is probably
Germany's ambition in this region to
secure the control of southwestern
Finlandasfar as Helsingfors.
The contents of the peace treaty be-
tween the Germans and the Bolsheviki
have not been made public, but there
is no room for doubt that the Teuton
representatives exacted from the Rus-
sians a place in keeping with their
bold desires.
Inundate Little Russia
In Podolia, the Austro-Hungarian
forces are evidently meeting with
slight resistance as they inundate
Little Russia. A strong indication of
this is the Vienna statement that al-
ready they have captured more than
770 guns and 1,000 machine guns, and
in addition large quantities of war
material.
In eastern Siberia the Bolshevik
element evidently is placing obstacles
in the way of a possible Japanese in-
vasion of that territory. Already they
have destroyed bridges along the
trans-Siberian railway between Bar-
kal and the Chinese frontier,. in addi-
tion to having mined, for eventual
destruction if necessary, other por-
tions of the railway line.
COUZENS REFUSES
TO QUIT POLICE
Detroit, March 4.-James Couzens,
Detroit multi-millionaire police com-
missioner, intends to continue exer-
cising the duties of his office, despite
an order from Alderman Joseph
Walsh, acting mayor, removing him.
Xr. Couzens made this announcement
late today.
Alderman Walsh was one of the city
council members who recently voted
for a resolution asking for Mayor
4\arx to remove the commissioner be-
cause of the conditions in the city.
Mayor Marx ignored the resolution.;
Today at the action of the mayor,
Walsh became acting executive and
vacated the office of police commis-
sioner.
Mayor Marx was reported tonight
to be -hurrying back to the city to re-
appoint Mr. Couzens.
"Pat" Smith to Fight in the Air
Chicago, March 4.- C. C. Smith,
eX-'18, former captain of the Uni-
versity of Michigan football eleven,
will fight in the air instead of in the
navy. Smith, who was at the Great?
Lakes training station for seven
months, was granted his honorable
lIschare so he eould loin the -avia-

l
i

certain newspapers of the country are
mere hitches bound to occur in the
carrying on of any program of the
tremendousness of our war prepara-
bions, is the belief of Major J. A. Bur-
sley, formerly a member of the Engin-
eering faculty, later head of the Ord-
nance training courses here, and now
in Washington directing the training
of all men for the Ordnance depart-
.ment. Major Bursley stopped in Ann
Arbor while on an inspection tour, to
,see that the new supply course just
.starting gets under way successfully.
He expects to leave tonight.
Progress Inevitable
"It seems to me that the progress
is all that can be expected," said Major
Bursley. "There- is a tremendous
amount of work being done, and of
course in such big programs there are
bound to be a few mistakes and
hitches, but as regards the general
plan, I think it is proceeding very
well. Of course what is outside one's
own department is nearly as unfamil-
iar to us as it is to you."
The schools over which Major Bur-
sley has directorship turn out men for
handling supplies, such as are trained
in the local school, machine gun men,
inspectors in factories, handlers of
the big guns mounted on railway
trucks, drivers and mechanicians for
trucks and tractors, optical experts,
trained men for every need of the
Ordnance department.
No Lack of Men
"There will be no lack of. trained
men in this*department when they are
needed," said Major Bursley. . "We are
turning them out fast enough to keep
up with demands."
Until the appointment of Major
Bursley the various Ordnance training
pchools were not under one head. They
were operated by the Ordnance de-
partment, but separately. It has been
his job to gather the threads together,
and unite them in a single admin-
strative office to direct the activities
of all.

Sophomores, juniors, and seniors
may attend the summer military train-
ing camp to be given at the University
during the summer session, accord-
ing to an announcement issued last
night by Commandant Lieut. George C.
Mullen.
The training camp will last for a
period of seven weeks and will give
the students adequate training in the
different military tactics. 'It was pre.
viously stated that only juniors and
seniors would be allowed to attend
the camp, but the offer has been ex-
tended to sophomores.
Hand in Names
All students desiring to attend the
camp must hand in their names to the
commanders of the companies before
3 o'clock tomorrow afternoon. The
commanders of the companies will
turn in the names to the commandant
of the cadets at 4 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon.
The student must hand in his name,
the number of his company, and sign
the following contract:
"In consideration of commutation of
subsistence to be furnished me in ac-
cordance with law, I hereby agree to
continue in the R. O. T. C. during the
remainder of my course in the Uni-
versity of Michigan, to devote five{
hours per week during such period to
the military training prescribed and
to pursue the courses of camp train-
ing during such period, prescribed by
the secretary of war."
Uniforms Given to Cadets
"When the individual members of
the unit have agreed in writing to par-
ticipate in such camps of instruction
as the secretary of war shall prescribe,
there will be issued to such institu-
tion the following additional uniform:
"For each member of the unit who
so agrees: One service hat, one cord1
hat, two pairs olive drab cotton
breeches, and two olive. drab flannel
shirts." The above contract and arti-;
cles to be given to the men are ex-1
:tracts from general orders number 49.
Reports to be handed in by the com-
pany commanders in person to Com-;
mandant Lieutenant Mullen before 4
o'clock tomorrow afternoon. The
military authorities expressed a hope
of obtaining a large number of cadets
for the summer training camp.
SENIOR INVITATION ORDJERS
WILL BE TAKEN AGAIN TODAY
Those Who Failed to Secure Litera-y
Certificates Can Get Them This 1
Afternoon

Seatstfor "Let's Go!" to be present-
ed at the Whitney march 13, 14, 1~
and .6, will be placed on sale this
afterncon at Hill auditorium to par-
ticipating life members only
Members holding slips numbered 1
to 100 may l-u- chase tickets from 2 to
3 o'clock; numbers 101 to 200, 3 to 4
o'clock; numbers 201 to 300, 4 to 5
o'clock.
Mail orders calling for seats for
opening performance, Wednesday
night, March 13, will be filled before
the box-office sale begins.
Ycarly members may now obtain
order slips by presenting their mem-
bership cards at the Union desk. Uni-
vt(rsity women may secure blanks at
10 o'clock Wednesday morning at the
Women's league office in Parbour gym-
nasium.
ASK STUDENTS TO ADOPT
OPERA FOR FORMAL NIGHT
RESOLUTION PASSES STUDENT
COUNCIL; IS APPROVED BY
PRESIDENT

WILL PRESENT PLAY AT'
MAJESTIC THEATER ON
APRIL 19'

THE

JOHNSON, '20, STAR
BY PLACING 3 FIR
Zoellin Takes Second in Seveni;
Yard Dash in Face of Keen
4 Competition
Michigan's track team put Mic
on the Conference athletic ma
copping more points than any
team at Urbana Saturday night
Every Michigan man taken
placed in some event, Carl Jo
was the individual star, taking
firsts in the high and low hurdle
the high jump. His time in the 1
races was as fast as that made
year in these events, equalling
Illinois Armory record in one <
heats.

MIGHIGAN l9
MIOST POINTS
EVERY MAIZE AND BLUE
PLACES IN SOME
EVENT

After a year with no presentation
the Comedy club players will appear
on the night of April 19 at the Maj-
estic theater in "Miss Hobbs," a four-
act farce-comedy by Jerome K. Jer-
ome, which takes its theme from the
feminist movement and its influence
on domesticity.,
The play was scheduled for present-
ation last spring but had to be given
up because of the exodus of all the
male talent into training camps. It is
a comedy which had a very popular
professional presentation. The role
was created by Annie Russell, who ap-
peared here this winter in "The Thir-
teenth Chair," in 1900 at the Lyceum
theater in New York, and had an ex-
tended run.
Deals With.,Woman Bachelor
It deals with the activities of a cer-
tain bachelor woman wlio, through
her teachings and preachings, is dis-
rupting the domestic life of the com-
munity, particularly of the Kingsearl
family. As a restraining influence
there appears on the scene Wolfl
,Kingsearl, a bachelor man of the
world, who wagers a dinner he can
kiss Miss Hobbs within a week. The
resulting complications furnish the
comedy.
Warren H. Townsend of the oratory
department will direct the presenta-
tion. Mr. Townsend had six years ex-
,perience on the professional stage,
playing important roles in the "Clans-
man," and other big productions.
Detroit Company to Furnish Scenery
Special scenery is being furnished
by the Whitney company of Detroit.
One of the big sets will be a boat
scene, which is expected to equal in
beauty any set every used by a local
production.
Rehearsals are being conducted
almost nightly. One part is still un-
taken, that of a 16 year old mischiev-
ous boy which offers great possibilities
to an actor. Anyone who wishes to
tryout for it is asked to appear at re-
hearsal at 7 o'clock tonight in Uni-
versity Hall.

Students will be asked to give up
the formal night for the annual Un-
ion opera, according to a resolution
adopted yesterday by the Student
council in its regular meeting held
at the Union.
This resolution was adopted, as was
the resolution some time ago for an
informal _J-hop, by an unanimous
vote. The reason for the action- is the
one given for abolishing the J-hop
and other formal functions this year,
that formal affairs are out of harm-
ony with the war conditions.
Pres. Hutchins Approves Action
President Harry B. Hutchins said
yesterday when informed of the ac-
tion of the Student council: "I be-
lieve it is in line with the condition
of the times to make things just as
simple and cheap as possible."
Mr. Homer Heath, '07, secretary of
the Union, speaking of the resolution
as an official of the Union, said:
"From our standpoint we have never
had a formal night. If people came
to the box office and asked for tickets
for the formal night we informed them
that there was no formal night."
Faculty and Students Favor Move
Dean John R. Effinger of the liter-
ary college, stated that he thought
that the resolution was a good one and
ought to be followed by the students.
Many other prominent faculty men
and students expressed themselves
in favor of the action of the Student
council.
CITIZENS TO VOTE
ON WATER PROBLEM
The water proposition will be pre-
sented to a vote of the people at tW'e
spring election. This was decided at
the meeting of the common council
held last night at which the members

Graduates Get Commissions
The men who graduated from the
focal school have stood on a par with
any men in the country, according t
information which he has been able to
gather. Eight of the 12 men gradu-
ated from the first course here last'
,Tune have been commissioned, and
;one of the four remaining has beenI
transferred to the Engineering corps
n the last class graduated from the.
officers' training camp for Ordnance
men at Camp Meade, Md., were five
Mlichigan men.
CROWDER URGES PASSAGE OF
"CLASS 1" CHANGE IN DRAFT
Washington, Marsh 4.-Provost-
Marshal Crowder appeared before the
Mouse military committee again today
to urge prompt passage of the joint
resolution providing for a change in
;the draft law so as to base the quota
of each district on the number of men

Place Second in Relay
In the two mile relay Coach ]
rell's green quartet placed secon
Chicago's veteran team. With I
nelly and Sedgwick the only men'
have had any previous intercolleg
experience, the Maize and Blue i
ners looked good.
Zoellin took second place in
seventy-five yard dash in the fact
keen competition. The dash
hurdle events were the ones in w
the time was as fast as in last ye
carnival. Zoellin in beatign But
the negro sprinter from Dubuque
lege, and a nine-and-four-fifth sec
man in the century dash to the t
showed that the Wolverines will hi
a man to fill O'Brien's shoes left
ant last year.
Baker and Cross Win Points
Haigh tied with Johnson and Ric
Kansas for first place in the li
jump, and performed in a way to g
Coach Farrell hopes that he will
able to clear the bar at six feet
better in the later meets. Baker t
third in the shot put. Cross tied
second in the pole vault. Both wv
having their first experience in
company and both came through M
Cross made over eleven feet and w
more of Steve's training should
velop into a sure point winner. B
er thew the shot around forty fee
Chicago Wins Relay
Gilfallen of Notre Dame defes
Lang of Illinois, for the all-aro
championship getting eight mi
points than Fisher of Chicago, in :
year's meet. The Windy City's r
teams took first in the one, two a
four mile relays. About the s
number of athletes were entered 1
year as last, but the war time te
were not of the same class.
Summaries:
75 yard dash - Carroll, Ill
first; Zoellin,Michigan, second; I
ler, Dubuque, third. Time 7 4-5 s
onds.
75 yard high hurdles - Johns
Michigan, first; Gilfallen, Notre Da
second; Andrews, Wisconsin, th
Time, 9 4-5 seconds.
Pole vault - Lang, Illinois, fi
Cross, Michigan, Wilkens, Ames, a
Rademacher, Notre Dame, tied for
ond. Height, 11 feet, 6 inches.
High jump - Haigh and John
Michigan, and Rice, Kansas, tied
first. Height, 5 feet, 10 12 inches.
Shot put-Weiss, Illinois, first;Q
fallen, Notre Dame, second; _Ba
Michigan, third. Distance, 41 fee
1 -2 inches.
Broad Jump-Butler, Dubuque, fi
Gilfallen, Notre Dame, second; La
Illinois, -third. Distance,' 22 feel
inches.
75 yard low hurdles - Johns
Michigan, first; Gilfallen, NotreDa:
second; Andrews, Wisconsin, thi
Time 8 3-5 seconds.
Four- mile relay- Chicago, fir
Ames, second; Wisconsin, third. Ti
19 minutes 2-5 seconds.
Two mile relay - "Chicago, fir
Michigan,second; Wisconsin, thi
Time 8 minutes 21 seconds.
One mile relay-Chicago, first;
inois, second; Wisconsin, third. TI
3 minutes 30 2-5 seconds.
One mile high school relay-Univ
sity high, Chicago, first; Champai
second; Urbana, third. Time 3 minu
Ad A_

Because so many calls have been
coming in for senior literary invita-
tions from people who failed to order
their supply last week, the chairman
will take orders today between the
hours of 2 and 4 o'clock in the ms.in
corridor of Univer'sity hall. Because
of the fact that these invitations will
necessitate a special order the price
has been slightly raised, the new
prices being 41 cents for the leather
invitations and 8 cents for the paper
engraved announcements. This date

fn class 1, instead of on the popula- will be the last one on which orders
tion. for the invitations will be taken.
Under the new classification there'
will be nobody in class 1, except per- Italians Suffer From Hand Swelling
,sons immediately available for ser-I Rome, March 4.-Hundreds of thou-
vice, so General Crowder explained. sands of persons throughout Italy
By basing the quota on that class, the have suffered this winter. from chil-
unfair burden placed on states with blain, or violent swelling of hands
large alien populations will be avoided. and feet.
U U

unanimously voted to put the question
before the citizens as to the advisa il-
ity of floating bonds for $200,000 to
build a pumping station and wooden
pipe line to supply the three milliox,
gallons of water needed in Ann Arbor.
The idea of installing a filtration
was given up because there could be
no assurance that the water would be
pure. City Engineer Manley Osgood
estimated that it would cost approxi-
mately $140,000 to bring the Steere
water into this city but said that this
would probably be the total cost while
in case a filtration plant, the annual
upkeep expenses would probably be
$10,000.
Engineer Osgood advises a wooden
pipe line because the price of iron is at
present more than double'the normal'
price. The woodeA line, he said wot d
last from 20 to 70 years and a new
iron line could be installed without
much additional cost when the demand
for iron was not so great. He assured
the council that the water at the
Steere farm could adequately supply
the need of Ann Arbor, but advised
retaining;the present source in case
of any emer-gency such as tire.
H. H. Bancroft, Historian, Dies
San, Francisco, March 4.-- Hubert
,Howe Bancroft, famous American his-
torian, died Saturday at Walnut
Creek, 20 miles east of this city, age
Qt V.Aa..

- * * *- * * * - * - * a

,*
*
*
*

Sophomore engineers will meet
in assembly at 9 o'clock tbis
morning in Room 348 Engineer-
ing building. Prof. Fred M. Tay-
lor of the Economics department
will address the assembly.

n
'IC
*

TODAY, 4:15 P. M.
Social Phase of the "World Today"
Locture by
A. E. WOOD
Barbour Gym.

* * *

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