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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 24, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ER ASSOCIATED PRESS
ated Press is exclusively entitled
or republication of all news dis-
ted to it or not otherwise credit-
paper and also the local news
rein.
ewspaper at the University of
Published every morning except
ing the university year.
the postoffice at Ann Arbor as
matter.
nn Arbor Press Building. Sub.
" carrier, $2.50; b mail, $a oo.
tions : Quarry's; Students' Sup-
he Delta. Phones: Business, 96o;
14.
ations not to exceed 300 words
r notices of events will be pub-
e Daily, at the discretion of the
ft at the office in the Ann Arbor
or in the notice box in the west
the general library, where the
collected at 7:30 o'clock each
[cDonald......Managing Editor
nery.........Business Manager
.Harry M. Carey'
.~C. S. Clark, Jr.
. James Schermerhorn, r.
itor. .........r.Bruce Millar
itor .......... Bruce A. Swaney
tor ............Philip C. Pack
[tor .........Mildred C. Mighell
or .........Margaret H..Cooley
itor......Albert E. Horne, Jr.'
nso;;........ Advertising' Manager
letfe......Publication Manager
li.......... Circulation Manager
imith........... Credit Manager
evre........ Office Manager
Robinson.. Subscription Manager
NIGHT EDITORS
kVilKon Clarence L. Roeser
Mark K. Ehlbert

keep from buying a bond. Camouflage
of this variety will never win the war
for us!-The Pennsylvanian.
Today is one day in the year more
than any other to show the Germans
that* this country means business.
If you don't want to loan your lib-
erty, you had better Liberty loan.
One of the women reports wrote this.
A good hunch for saving, boys, is
to cut out having anything to do with
sweet things.
Liberty bonds are guaranteed by the
government against any decline in
value, as they are convertible into any
succeeding issue at a higher rate.
Remember when you are beginning
to think you're "the whole cheese"
that there is a variety known as lim-

burger.

weak-

It's a great life if you don't
end.

ta

Jr

n Edgar L. Rice
J. R. McAlpine
Paul A. Shinkman
Vera Brown
K. Frances Handibo
one Given
ESS STAFF
Orville Z. Gates
Harry D. Hause
Lambert Hirsheimer
N. Gaethke

ger
ank

Y, OCTOBER 24, 1917.
tor-Cos. R.0sius, Jr.

3RTY LOAN DAY,
Liberty Loan Day.
fact send the red
n flooding through

blood
your

Does the fact that this is a
al holiday thrill you Have you
id that today is more than a na-
holiday-that it is an inter-
al holiday, a day that will be
ide by the civilized world in
o come?
mu have not realized all of these
you are not awake to the is-
>f the day. Today of all days,
the enthusiasm for the Liberty
eaches its culmination, the eyes
allies on the blood-clotted bat-
.ds of the continent are focused.
America, their staunch ally who
deliver them from the throes
ssian militarism and institute a
ra in the lives of all their peo-
The burden of responsibility
ith the American people; not
Sfew of them, but with every
them.
ther you own but a single bond
second issue of Liberty loan,
er you own thousands of them,
ther, because of circumstances.}
wn none-today is the greatest
unity of your lifetime.
ay is the day when Americans,
:pected to flaunt' the colors of
racy in the battle for world
every loyal American to a
expected to participate. Today
day set asmide to crystalize the
ents of our peoples into one
esolve for civilization's victory.
merican refusing to seize avidly
this opportunity deserves more
he casual censure of thinking
y is a world holiday, for the
to make immortal.
RACTICAL PATRIOTISM
our patriotism of the practica'
Or is it of the kind which
sts itself with merely the fly-
a flag or the singing of the
al anthem?
it stand the acid test of self-
ce. If it can do this, then it is
igher and truer patriotism-a
rhich is in some measure illus-
by the recent action of a wom-
.dent of the University.
s particular studentywanted to
Liberty bond. Her allowance
itirely consumed by the cost of
ecessities of life-room, board,
ertain unavoidable incidentals.
s the old saying goes, where
a will there's a way. She left
ther expensive boarding house
esolved to satisfy herself with
xpensive and choice food.
woman will buy her Liberty
is the patriot, and her's is the
ism of the highest calibre.
CAMOUFLAGE!
ouflage is a useful thing in some
sses. Belligerents depend upon
a great aid- in gaining victory.'
has no place in connection
he Liberty loan campaign. Put

I W~omen- I
Women trying out for The Daily
are expected to be present at a cub
meeting at 2:15 this afternoon.
Y. W. C. A. cabinet will not meet
this week.
Dean Myra B. Jordan's reception for
the girls of the senior class will be
held at 3:30 o'clock Friday afternoon
instead of 4 o'clock as 'announced.
Scenarios for the Junior Girls' play
must be handed in to Emily Powell,
'19, before Oct. 30.
Masques wit meet at 4:30 o'clock
this afternoon in Barbour gymnasium.
Freshmen and new girls interested in
stunts given by the Masques for
Women's, league parties throughout
the year are asked to report at Sarah
Caswell Angell hall at 4:30 o'clock
Friday afternoon.
Sophomores should -pay their fresh-
man spread tax of $1.00 at the office
of the Dean of Women or to Doreen
Potter, '20.
There will be no Y. W. C. A. ves-
pers this afternoon.
Mrs. Clarice Vaughn of Detroit, will
speak at 7:30 o'clock tonight at the
city Y. W. C. A. on "Surgical Dress-
ings and General Red Cross Work."
All University women are invited.
The vocational conference commit-
tee of the Women's league will not
meet this week.
Women of the University are ex-
pected to march in the Liberty loan
parade at 3:30 o'clock today. Places
in which the classes are to assemble
are announced on the first page of
The Daily.
The Women's league party, sched-
uled for this afternoon, has been post-
poned until 3:30 o'clock tomorrow.
Upperclass women planning to take
playground work or military marching
must sign the bulletin in Barbour gym-
nasium before Nov. 1. The courses
will not be offered unless 30 sign.
The hour for playground will be 1:30
o'clock on Wednesdays, commencing
Nov. 21. The class in military march-
ing will ,be held on Wednesdays at
'2:30 o'clock.
Gymnasium clothes and lockers
must be0 arranged for before Wednes-
day, Oct. 31. Every one taking re-
quired work must have an individual
locker. Attention is called to the fac
that the $1 invested in a locker ticket
serves rather as a gymnasium fee
than as a passport to locker privileges.
The hour for the sale of supplies is on
Thursday from 1:30 to 3:30 o'clock
and lockers are assigned on Wednes-
day and Thursday mornings, 9:30 to
11:30 o'clock and on Thursday after-
noon, 3 to 4:30 o'clock. The hours
for next week will be announced later.
If Palmer field is not dry, hockey
will be played on the Twelfth street
field. Everyone coming out for elec-
tive periods must keep appointments
unless it is raining.
WOMAN'S LEAGUE PROVIDES
MAGAZINES FOR GYMNASIUM
lagazines provided by the Women's
league in the parlors of Barbour gym-
nasium will be at the disposal of wom-
en of the University throughout the
year.
In the selection of these magazines
an attempt has been made to furn-
ish material which will be helpful in
the various courses of study and be
a source of enjoyment for idle hours.
The list chosen is: The Atlantic
Monthly, Review of Reviews, the Am-.
erican Magaizne, the Red Cross mag-
azine, the New 'York Times, Vogue,
Vanity Fair, the Saturday Evening
Post, and the Survey.

Michigan Dames Elect Year's Officers'
The Michigan Dames, society for the
wives of married students, elected Mrs.
Mason Lyons, president and Mrs. W.
J. Ehlers, vice-president, at their
meeting Monday evening in Newberry
hall.

LIBERAILITY SHOULD RULE~
STUDENTS OUGHT TO SACRIFICE
PERSONAL LUXURIES FOR NA-
TIONS ADVANCEMENT.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:,
It would seem to me that the Uni-
versity of Michigan will be eternally
shamed if 'our student body does not
rally loyally to the call of our coutntry
this week.
This war is a war between auto-
cracy and democracy. The boast of
the University of Michigan has been
that she stands as the very embodi-
ment of the spirit of democracy-that
she draws no distinction of wealth,
creed or nationality. The splendid ex-
ample that is set by such organiza-
tions as the Chinese club and some
of the fraternities and sororities ought
to arouse the enthusiasm and patriot-
ism of every American student. It
ought to cause everyone with a drop of
red blood to wake up and take a stand
as an American and as a citizen.
The fact that 1,200 or 1,500 Mich-
gan students and alumni are now act-
ually in service, that hundreds of them
soon will be at the battle front, that
many of them may give all that man
can give to his country, should create
a spirit of liberality and of sacrifice
in those of us who have not yet been
called to the service. I hope to see
every student a partner to the extent
of at least one bond. I hope to see all
expensive social functions abolished.
I hope to see our students voluntarily
bring their standard of living down to
the same fugal basis as that which
prevailed in the early years of the
Life has been very easy for many
of this generation of students. It is
hard for many, it is true, but those
who can least afford it are the most
ready to make a sacrifice. Let us en-
courage the spirit of sacrifice. The
Liberty bond is in no sense a gift.
It is an investment and a good invest-
ment. The buying of a bond should
maen the giving up of a personal lux
ury for a few months. That we should
be ready to do for the sake of those
who are giving up all luxury and who
are offering their lives.
PROF. H. E. RIGGS.
U.S. ROTARY CLUBS TO
RAISE WAR CAMP FUNDS.
Chicago, Oct. 23.-The hundreds of
Rotary clubs in the United states are
being urged to take active part in
raising the War Camp Recreation
Fund," which will be used by the
playground and recreation associa-
tion to assist soldiers to find whole-
some amusement when they visit
towns near the cantonments and
camps. Chesley R. Perry of Chicago,
secretary of the International Asso-
ciation of Rotary clubs, has sent a let-
ter to each of the 33,000 members of
the organization in this country, call-
ing their attention to the needs of this
work.
In telling of this activity, Mr. Perry
said:
"One of the very first, most essen-
tial, and, In some cases, most difficult
business is to create in communities
near the camps an attitude friendly
to the soldiers. The playground and
recreation association workers try to
make people realize that our soldiers
are just regular fellows like the aver-
age American youth, except that their
.having passed rigid physical tests im-
plies that a great number who have

led vicious lives have been excluded
on account of physical disabilities:
Which have come to them as a result
of such living, and that these fellows
whom we have in camp average clean-
er and better and more decent than
the ordinary run of young men of sim-
ilar age."
SIXTY LEAVE LITERARY COLLEGE
Lack of Finances, Draft, and Home.
Sickness Causes in Most Cases
About 60 students enrolled in the
literary college have withdrawn their
registration cards and left the Univer-
sity. This number is somewhat high-
er than the previous year, because of
the fact that a few men were called in
the second draft after they had enroll-
ed in the University.
Lack of finances is thought to be the
cause for the departure of most of the
students, although in some cases a
spell of homesickness was instrument-
al. A few students withdrew their reg-
istration from the literary college to
enroll in a different college or school,
but did not leave the University.

COST OF PRINT PAPER IN FRANCE
FIVE TIMES ORIGINAL PRICE
Increased Charge for News Service
Necessary to Curb Disastrous
Demand
(By Associated Press.)
Paris, Oct. 21. - Print paper costs
five times as much today in France as
it did before the war, and is hard
to get at any price. That is the ex-
planation the press gives the public
for the increase in price of one cent
papers to two cents a copy.
Paper pulp in the Scandinavian;
countries costs seven times more than;
In 1914, it costs 20 times as much to
bring it to France by sea, the insur-
ance is from 8 to 10 per cent, of the
the value of the cargo, the port dues
are from one to six per cent, labor
costs 60 per cent more and coal is
seven times as dear as before the war.
The government sees no other solu-
tion of the problem than a decrease in
the consumption of paper. That is
the reason why it obliged the publish-
ers to cease selling papers at a cent
unless they were willing to reduce the
size of their 'sheet to infinitesimal
proportions.
The result of the increase has been
almost a disaster to political organs
that are made up more of opinions
than news. When they sold for a
cent, readers would buy two or three,
or even more, of different political
complexion, sometimes out of curios-
ity and sometimes in order to keep
posted on the different sides of all
questions. Now they have reduced
their purchases of papers.
The circulation of the most import-
ant newspapers has been affected but
not seriously, as everyone wants at
least one paper in the morning for the
latest news.

NEW AND SECOND HAND
FOR ALL DEPARTMENTS
Engineering Supplies
Drawing instruments.

STATE' 5 AIN
ST RE ET 'STR EE T
ENGINEERING TOOLS
ALARM CLOCKS,
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES
SWITZER'S
STATE STREET HARDWARE
Laundry Cases
For Parcel Post
$1.50
SLATER'S BOOK SHOP
PRONE 480 336 S. STATE ST.

BOO

'I

K

Former Athletic Director on Campus
Mr. Frank L. Rand, formerly assist-
ant director of intramural activities,
visited members of the Athletic asso-
ciation Monday afternoon, and watch-
ed the Varsity practice at Ferry field.
Mr. Rand is now coach of the foot-
ball, basketball, and track teams in
the Union high school, Grand Rapids.

t
f
i
1

HANDY INFORMATION FOR
ANN ARBOR TRAVELERS
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Bffective May 22, 1917)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--7:35 a
in., 8:to a. m., and hourly to 7:to p. im., 9:i o
p. M.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 6:48 V. m.; to Lansing,
8:48p p.i
Jackson Express Cars 1.local stops west of
Ann Arbor)- 9:48 a. in. and every two fours
to 7:48 V. im.
Local Cars East Bound-5i:3s a. m., 6:40
a. m., 7:05 a. n. and every two hours to 7:05
p. m.. 8:o5 p. in.. 9:o5 p."im., 10 :50 p. n.
To Ypsilanti only, 9:2o a. m., 9:5o a m.,
a :o5 p. in.. 6:05 P."in, 9:45 P. im, 11:45 p. .
1z:20 a. m.. I:xo a. m.. 1:2o a. . To Saline,
change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cats West Bound-6:os a. m., 7:48
a. ni.. 1o:o V. in., x:2o a. in.

We have both the inclination and
the equipment to furnish the
best in banking service
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
INCORPORATED 1869
Capltaliand Surplus $ '500,000.00
Resources . . . $4,000,000.00
Northwest Corner Main and
Huron Streets
707 North University Avenue

%Jl"11 N A..fJM1L 1

S

I

The Kemfp Music Studio:
Organ, Voice Culture. 312 S.
St. Phone 212-J.-Adv.

Piano,
Division

r

-1

Prescriptions and
House Drug Needs
Our Specialty

11

Shoe styles for

HOWEVER
we have many other items you
will need. So many you will
wish you had come earlier.

Young Men in our
highest grade shoes
are identically the
same as last year

1]

I

QUARRY DRUG CO'S
PRESCRIPTION STORE
Cor. State and University
Phone 808

A

Txg
Shoes for Young Men

I

Solid Brass Removable C
Glass Dish Ash Trays i ,
HALLER & FULLER
$TATE STREET JEWELERS

I

I

t--

-1

"Just a Little BETTER"
ICE CREAM
for all occasions
218 S. Main Street

We

are duplicating

n i

shoes that

we sold

If its

anything P1

last year-this means
that men have found what they
wanted in shoes and want the

graphic a s k SW A I
713 East University Av
STOP AT
338 'MAYNARD
For L~unaos and Sodas

same thing again.

WAGNER & CO.
State Street at Liberty

RESTA VRAN
MICHIGAN I
Phosie 948..1 601E.

i

Established 1848

Do over the bath room with
white enamel. Easy to apply
very durable. C. H. Major &
-AdY.

our
and
Co.

9 to

_ : i

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