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October 24, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-24

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J JXS44 Lip

lS iA)

OUR LIBERTY BOND YET?

HEWEATHER
COLDER, CLOUDY,
SNOW FLURRIES

w1it tikrn

:4Aaittl

ASSOCIATED
;PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIR
SERVICE

XXVIII. No. 20.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1917.

PRICE THREE CE

ENCH PENETRITE
ERMAN LINES IN
IDISSONS SECTOR,

RUSSIANS INFLICT LOSS
OF 15 SHIPS ON HUNS
SINK AT LEAST SIX GERMAN DE-
STROYERS IN THE GULF
OF RIGA

UNIVERSITY RAISES
LOAN TO_$184,150
Students Not Yet Awakened To Full
Realization of Bonds'
Necessity.
"HURRY-UP" POLICY NEEDEW4
IN COMPLETING ALLOTMENT.
Delta Gamma Enters List In Second
Place With Sum Amounting
To $5,100.

AK THROUGH TO DEPTH
2 1.5 MILES ON SIX
MILE FRONT

OF I

(By Associated Press.)

APTURE 7,500 TEUTONS
AND MANY WAR GOODS

Retire Slightly Under
tacks at Haultholst For-
est

At.I

(By Associated Press)
While the allied troops were busily
engaged in consolidating positions won
Monday in Flanders, Petain's forces
struck a mighty and unexpected blow
against the German line northeacst of
Soissons Tuesday morning and made
some of the most important gains of
ground since they threw back the army
of the German crown prince which
was besieging Verdun.
The stroke was made over a front
of about six miles from the east of
Vauxaillon to Pargny-Filian. Under
rainy and generally unfavorable
weather conditions, the French push-
ed forward and penetrated hte German
line at one point to a depth to two
and one-fifth miles.
Numerous important positions fell
one by one into the hands of Petain's
men, and in addition more than 7,500
Germans and numerous amounts of
war material and 25 heavy and field
guns were captured.
The greatest depth of the drive was
in the center of the line where the vil-
lage of Chavignon was captured after
a violent struggle which resulted in
the enemy fleeing pell-mell. Some of
the best troops in the army of the Ger-
man crown prince were engaged in
endeavoring to hold back the on-
slaught, but the efforts were unavail-
ing under the enthusiasm of the
French to win 'positions which would
place them more advantageously to
press on later toward Laon.
In Flanders both the. British and
French troops are holding all the
gains made in Monday's drive north-
east of Ypres except at one place on
the southern fringe of the Hautholst
forest where the Germans in a vicious
counter attack, forced a slight retire-
ment by the British.
Habitual Haunter
Captured At Last

The latest advices concerning the
naval activity in the Gulf of Riga be-
tween the Germans and Russians show
that although the Russians lost the
battleship Slava and a large torpedo
boat destroyer, the Germans were the
heavier losers. Two of their dread-
naughts, one cruiser, 12 torpedo boats,
one transport, and numerous mine
sweepers were put out of action by
the Russian fleet. While the exact
fate of these vessels has not been as-
certained by the Petrograd govern-
ment, it is announced that at least six
of the German destroyers were sunk.
The W admiralty staff in its review
of the fighting says that the Russian
units fought excellently against the
superiority of the Germans. The
statement reads:
"During October 21 important ene-
my naval forces, together with trans-
ports, were sighted by our outposts
in the Gulf of Riga. In Moon sound
the enemy seems to be clearing the wa-
ter of obstructions which we laid
down. There was no naval action
during the day but enemy submarines
were discovered in the Gulf of Fin-
land.
"In the recent operations the enemy
employed the major part of the fleet
an dhis overwhelming superiority en-
abled him to carry out debarkation
rapidly and successfulily. Our fleet
only was able to do its best to hinder
these efforts and to inflict maximum
losses. With this object we delivered
a series of attacks, using all the naval
resources in our possession."
LIBERTY DAY IS ACID
TEST FOR LOAN SALES

*
*

UNIVERSITY LOAN POISED
FOR FINAL SMASH
The' ten highest subscribers:
Phi Kappa Psi ............ $5,450

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

*
*

Delta Gamma .............
Zeta Beta Tau .............
Senior Engineers ..........
Chinese club ..............
Alpha Delta Phi ...........
Trigon Campus Tent.......
Theta Delta Chi ...........
Trigen .......... . ........
Newberry residence.......

5,100
4,000
3,350
2,550
2,500
2,450
2,200
2,200
2,100.

MILITANT
KAISER;

AMERICA CAN WHIP
APATHETIC PEOPLE,
NEVER

Delta Theta
Formei

Phi S]
r Porter T
Ypsi Lair.

Leuths
o His

Hunt

After being touched by burglars
three different times in the past five
months for clothing and money aggre-
gating nearly $400, members of Delta
Theta Phi fraternity decided that too
much was enough.
A third visit Sunday night at the fra-
ternity house, 721 South State street,
netted the thief $165 worth of clothing
and four pounds of coffee. Organiz-
ing a detective bureau of their own,
the victims conceived a suspicion
and procured a warrant to search. A
visit to Ypsilanti was made yester-
day afternoon by four of the burglariz-
ed ones, in company with two deputy
sheriffs. As a result of the trip,
"Pete" Harris, a dusky-hued, who
formerly was a porter at the frater-
nity house, is enjoying the comforts
of the local bastille.
Clothing stolen from the house last
May was found in Harris' Ypsilanti
residence. The gentleman himself was
detained just as he was about to take
hurried leave of his Ann Arbor office,
I. e. the machine shop of the Hoover
Steel company.
He was wearing a pair of shoes that
belonged to one of the Delta Phi boys
prior to Sunday night. He carried a
cigaret case that had a similar his-
tory. Matches and cigarets were his
own, as far as could be determined.
Part of his equipment for business
was a home-made "Black Jack" made
of a Hoover one-inch steel ball, and
also a leter from a former house man-

Washington, Oct. 23. - Tomorrow,
Liberty Day" by proclamation of Pres-
ident Wilson, the nation faces the test
of determining whether the second
Liberty loan of 1917 shall roll up an
overwvhelming success.
It faces the greatest day of the cam-
paign with not more than half of the
$5,000,000,000 hoped for actually sub-
scribedN\according to careful estimates
compiled by the treasury officials to-
night. Two and one-half billion dol-
lars, they estimate, must be obtained in
subscriptions in the four days that re-
main,
Field forces of 2,000,000 workers will
be re-inforced tomorrow by speaker,
including members of the cabinet
former President Taft, William J.
Bryan, Speaker Giark and other 'na-
tionally known orators.
Secretary McAdoo telegraphing
from Nashville, sounded the keynote
of the day in a Liberty Day statement
issued here tonight..
"All that is needed now to make the
Liberty loan a success," he .said, "is
that the people generally in all parts
of the nation realize the personal ap-
plication of the loan appeal. There is
still top much of a tendency to believ.
that the loan will be subscribed easily
and without the assistance of the aver-
age man and woman.
"Militant America can whip the
kaiser; the kaiser can whip apathetic
America."
Business will be at a standstill
throughout the nation tomorrow ex-
cept for the sale of Liberty bonds.
Designated a national holiday by
President Wilson, the day has also
been made one by governors of the
various states. Business houses and
schools will be closed, thousands of
speakers will deliver addresses and
hundreds of thousands of new workers
will join for the day the army of 2,-
000,000 solicitors already in the field.
Arrested for stealing a red lantern,
Walter Richards, a student at the Uni-
versity, paid a fine of $25 and costs
before Judge William Doty yesterday.
Eight other red lanterns were missed
from the same place last week.

* Total student subscriptions *
* to date ............... .$ 69,600*
* Total faculty subscriptions *
* to date .................. 114,550 *
* Student total yesterday. 13,400 *
* University total, to date..184,150 *
* * * * * , * * * * * * * *
Liberty Loan subscriptions among
students of the University amounted
to $13,400 yesterday.
The total student loan purchase to
date is but $69,600, while the faculty
total is $114,550. The bond drive for
the entire University, faculty and stu-
dents included, has reached a total of
$184,150, far short of the quota and
expectations of the committee.
"Unless Michigan adopts a little
'hurry up' policy, other and smaller
universities in the east and middle
west will outstrip her in Liberty Loan
bond sales," said one member of the
committee yesterday.
"The campaign seems to be going
fairly well," asserted Mr. Francis Ba-
con, '02, executive chairman of the
loan fund in the University, "but,
there are a great many students, from
whom we have not heard as yet, who
do not realize the seriousness and
gravity of the situation attendant upon
the loan sale and the crisis which the
nation now faces. We want to have
these students respond out of a perfect
willingness of mind to sacrifice for
the good of America. It is the state
of mind that counts. Grudgingly sub-
scribing to the second Liberty Loan
is not patriotism, it is a mistake. We
need red-blooded American students
who can see the situation in its true
light, and then we know they will do
their duty."
Some new shifts have been made in
the ten highest subscribers' list. Del-
ta Gamma appears today for the first
time with $5,100. Many of the others
have materially increased their sales'
The girls on the Library staff have
been commended by the committee for
generous subscriptions to the fund.
No faculty'report was available yes-
terday for publication, but it is not
thought that their additions would
greatly increase the University total.
Bond salesmen, campaigners, and
minute men speakers are planning a
drive that will comb the campus be-
fore the close of the campaign. Prep-
arations are being made on a large
scale to canvass the whole student
body so that the loan and its impor-
tance may be explained to every one.
The faculty solicitors will continue to
work for a few days more.
City Committee May Oversubscribe
With the subscriptions in this city
reaching a total of $623,250, the com-
mitteemen once more expressed their
certainty of oversubscribing Ann Ar-
bor's quota by a large sum. The local
quota for a three billion dollar bond
has already been oversubscribed by
$50,000, but the committee has set out
to raise an amount in proportion to
the five billion dollar loan hoped for
and is confident of fulfilling its prom-
ises.
Boy Scout troops of Ann Arbor, un-
der the direction of Bernard Mason,
'19, raised subscriptions to the amount
of $18,050.
A committee consisting of Prof. J.
C. Parker, chairman; Mr. . C. Beal,
and Mr. H. Douglas was appointed to
(Continued on Page Six

"Sweetless

Days" Will Be
Unless Relief
Comes

Necessary)

Sugar is scarce in Ann Arbor and
unless the situation clears soon, we
will be experiencing sweetless days.
Many grocers have entirely depleted
their stock and those who still have
a small supply are limiting customers
to two pounds each.
They attribute the shortage to the
temporary closing of refineries pend-
ing a price decision by the govern-
ment, but they feel confident that new
shipments will be forthcoming within
the next 10' days.
JEWISH STUDENTS BEGIN
YEAR'S ATHLETICS.
The Jewish Students' congregation
opened the year's activities last night
with a social meeting at Newberry
hall. Robert Berman, '18, of the Glee
club rendered a violin solo and A. J.
Gornetsky, '19L, author of last year's
opera, gave selections from his own
compositions on the piano.
The weekly services of the congre-
gation are held at 6:45 o'clock every
Sunday evening in Neu . f...,;'ey hall. The
service is to bh held this coming Sun-
day with Rabbi Leo Franklin of De-
troit officiating.
Applicants Needed for Inlander Staff
Students who desire positions on
the staff of the Inlander are asked to
give their names to Prof. F. N. Scott,
of the rhetoric department, in order
that the board-in controll of student
publications can act upon such appli-
cations at its next meeting.
Practically the entire staff chosen,
for this year's magazine have enlisted
and are not here to tale up their
editorial work. The question of pub-
lishing the Inlander this year depends,
very largely on the number of appli-
n-ins received.

NEW YORK ARRESTS SMACK
OF ANOTHER IRISH PLOT
MELLOWS KNOWN SINN FEINER;
RECKLINGHAUSEN ALLEGED
BERNSTORFF ENVOY
BULLETIN
London, Oct. 23.-In the course
of a speech in the house of com-
mons today, Premier Lloyd George
declared the government was
aware that arrangements were
again being made, partly by
Count von Bernstorff, to land arms
in Ireland.
New York, Oct. 23.-Liam Mellows,
one of the recognized leaders in the
Sinn Fein rebellion in Ireland on
Easter Monday, 1916, and an associate,'
Baron Dr. Max von Recklinghausen,
a German subject, are under arrest in
this city, it was announced today by
William J. Flynn, chief of the United
States secret service.
The arrests were made on the eve
of' an announcement by Premier Lloyd
George in the house of commons that
the British government had knowledge
of another plot to land arms in Ire-
land. Mellows is charged with ob-
taining false papers to enable him to
leave the United States as an Ameri-
can seaman.
Von Recklinghausen, styled by
Flynn as a patent engineer of no lit-.
tle ability, has been turned over to
federal authorities for internment dur-
ing' the war. He is declared to have
been an intimate associate of the Sina
Feiners. A statement issued by Flynn
states papers found in Von Reckling-
hausen's rooms, and on his person,
'show definitely that large sums of
money had gone forward to France for
ultimate German purposes.
"Considerable literature and papers
of interest torthis government were
taken in the raid of the premises of
Mellows and Von Recklinghausen and
it will be sometime before the various
ramifications of this plot can be thor-
oughly detailed," said Flynn in an-
nouncing the arrests. He declared
Von Recklinghausen "has been men-
tioned as an envoy left here by Count
von Bernstorff," and that he main-.
tained two residences in New York, one
of which is near an East river bridge
commanding a clear view of the river.
LOCAL GROCERS FEEL
SCARCITY OF SUGAR

Second Semester Grades Show Fresh-
men Lead Classes in
Scholarship
Twenty-two students received all
"A" grades in their work last semester.
The freshmen lead the upper classes
in the number of students placed on
the honor roll, 10 of their class mem-
bers meriting the highest mark in all
their work. The junior class comes
a close second with eight on the list.
Following are the names of students
receiving all "A" grades: Harcourt L.
Caverly, '19, Toledo, O.; Roberta Deam,
"20, Bluffton, Ind.; Arthur W. Ehrl-
icher, '18, Pekin, Ill.; Howard A.
Denne, '18, Ann Arbor; Mark K. Ehl-
bert, '20, Memphis, Tenn.; Fred B.
Fead, '20, Port Huron; Raymond L.
Green, '20, Toledo, 0.; Andrew Haigh,
'18, Detroit; Charles R. Illick, '18M,
Hulmeville, Pa.; Abe H. Jacoby, '19,
Bay City; Christina Kersey, '18, Mun-
cie, Ind.; Marion Klinger, '18, Pitts-
burg, Pa.; Julia Lockwood, '20, Stur-
gis; Carl W. Neumann, '18, Detroit;
Lewis N. Osterman, '20, Toledo, O.;
Gerald P. Overton, '20, Martinsville,
Ind.; Mathilda M. Schroeder, '17, Bay
City; Morris Stark, '20, Toledo, 0.;
Houghton W. Taylor, '20, Ft. Wayne,
Ind.; Gladys E. Vinter, '20, Detroit;
Roger N. Walker, '19M, Detroit, and
Marion G. Wilson, '18, Ann Arbor.
SOLDIER ARTISANS MAY
COMPLETE CAMP CUSTER
COMMANDERS TO NAME MEN WHO
ARE ELIGIBLE FOR NEXT
OFFICERS' CAMP
Battle Creek, Oct. 23.-Soldiers of
the Camp Custer army, who have had
experience in carpentry, plumbing,
and steamfitting, may be detailed in
large numbers to assist in finishing
the construction of the different build-
ings which has been delayed by in-
ability to secure sufficient workmen.
An order has recently been received
from Washington to have no new
buildings constructed by the present
contractors. This is probably due to
a desire to complete the building work
as soon as possible. Another order
calls for an immediate report on the
condition of heating facilities.
With another contingent of selected
men coming in less than two weeks,
the heating of barracks is one of the
most vital questions before the mili-
tary authorities. At the present time
work along this line has been slow,
and the government desires informa-
tion on the heating facilities before
winter sets in.
Company commanders have received
an order to send in a list of names
of the men in their organizations who,
they believe, are fitted to take a course
in the next officers' training camp. A
school will be held simultaneously in
each camp of the country, commen-
ing Jan. 5 and ending April 5. The
number is limited to 17-10 per cent of
each organization.
The men to be selected must range
in age from 21 to 40 years. During
their period of service they will be on
detached duty, drawing the pay of their
grade. The soldiers will be fed and
clothed by the government during
their training. Graduates and under-
graduates of universities, colleges, and
military schools are preferred to make
up the personnel of the camps.
GERMANS GIVE UP
HOPE OF VICTORY?
Escaped Italian Asserts People Expect

Peace Will Come in
November
Washington, Oct. 23.-An Italian
workman,. interned in Germany since.
the beginning of the war, has escaped
through the Alps to his own country
with a report that the German people
want peace and expect it to come in
November.
Official dispatches received here to-
day tell the man's, story, according to
which, the Germans have abandoned
hope of victory at arms. Laborers
are threatening to leave factories if
the war continues another winter and
the civil population generally is liv-
ing under terrible conditions. He said
800 soldiers attending a circus at
Essen were killed at one time by
bombs of allied aviators.

S22

RECEIVE A'S
IN ALL COURSES

LIBERTY PARADE
LED BYPREIET
FEATURHE OF TODAY
ALL STUDENTS WILL GATHER AT
2:30 IN PATRIOTIC PAGEANT
OF LOAN DAY
WOMEN TO MARCH WITH
RESPECTIVE CLASSES
Mayor Wurster and City Organizations
Unite with University for Free-
domB oost
* Cadet companies are to lead *
theirrespective classes in the Lib-
* erty day parade today. They wU *
* assemble at 2:30 as follows: *
* Graduate school and seniors *
* meet on campus driveway, be. "
* tween Natural Science and Law *
* buildings. *
* Juniors on west side of eampus *
* driveway between Chemistry and *
* Natural Science buildings. *
* Sophomores on campus drve. *
* way east of Law building.
* Freshmen on east side of am. *
* pus driveway between Natural *
* Science and Chemistry buildings. *
* This parade will take the place *
* of regular drill. *
* G. A. MULLEN, Leutenant. *
* The facultyis to meet oneast*
* and west walks in front of Uni*
* versity hall. *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
Today we pay tribute to Lady Lib-
erty.
In so doing, the University will
cease to exist, for a few hours at
least, as an institution of classes
books, and military drills. In their
stead will be the Liberty Day parade
headed by President Harry B. Hutch-
ins, and Mayor E. M. Wurster.
Lieutenant G. A. Mullen has post-
poned drill for the afternoon in order
that the cadet corps might lead the
students in the parade. The Univer-
sity band will also be out to lead the
students and the cadet corps. Army
stores men are to be under direction
of Prof. J. A. Bursley. The classes
will appear in the following order:
Graduate school, seniors, juniors,
sophomores and freshmen.
The student body and the faculty
will march to the corner of orth
Main and Ann streets, where they will
be joined by all the local organizations
including the Ann Arbor troops of
Boy Scouts. All who can wlk are
urgently asked to take part.
Women are to be in the parade as
well as men and should assemble with
their classes.
The committee wishes to emphasize
the facts that the students are not to
disorganize. until they reach the cam-
pus where they will disband.s.
In connection with the Liberty Day
celebration Mayor Wurster, in a pro-
clamation, called upon all the busi-
ness men of the city to close their
stores at 3 o'clock and to take part
in the parade.
Gov. A. E. Sleeper issued a proclam-
ation urging the citizens of Michigan
to boost the sale of bonds on this day
The governor strongly recommends to
all mayors and executives of state
municipalities that they bend every
effort to co-operate in their several
localities in the celebration of Lib-
erty Day.

SORORITIES TO AID HOOVER
WITH WEEKLY MEATLESS DAY
Sororities will economize on meat.
Nearly all women's houses have ar-
ranged for one meatless day each week
and several will observe two. Those
who have not yet fallen in line ex-
pect to do so this week, with the ex-
ception of two or three who express
doubt about following the majority.
A majority of the girls who have
been asked about the change are en-
thusiastic, not only because they are
doing their bit but because they rel-
ish the variety that the omission of
meat, introduces.
The condition of Miss Lavinia Sey-
ler, who was struck and severely in-
jured by an automobile at Washte
naw avenue and Main street Saturday
evening, is reported improved and sht
is exnected to recover.

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