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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 24, 1917 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

YOST COULD USE THIS MAN

.........::Y.,

LVERINE ELEVEN

/r
1

Sparks and Cohn May Be Out of
Nebraska Game Satur-
day
BOYD SEEMS SLATED TO BE
AT END WHEN GAME STARTS
Yost Works Squad Hard to Prepare
for Tilt, with Team From
Lincoln, Nebraska
With Cohn 'still on the sick list,
and Sparks in such a condition that
it is doubtful whether he will be able
to play against Nebraska on Satur-
day, the- Michigan Varsity is not in
the best of condition to meet the
strong Cornhusker eleven.
Yost has been driving his men
from early afternoon until long after the
shadows have fallen on Ferry field the
two days of practice this week and
he promises as strenuous workouts
the rest of the week. The Wolverines
must reach their top form for the
contest this week end and Yost is
striving mightily to get the eleven
rounded out intobform.
Froemke has been playing left half
in the absence of Cohn, while Hanish
has been drawn back to right half,
which position he promises to oc-
cupy Saturday. Sparks has been run-
ning the team at quarterback, and al-
though Cliff promises to be in shape
for the game, Yost 'is afraid that he
will have to do without his brilliant
pilot.in the hardest game of the sched
ue.
Yost Drills Men on New Plays
All yesterday afternoon and Monday
night Yost worked on new plays and
the Varsity of theOETOAINSHRDLU
the wizardry of the Michigan mentor
will probably make its appearance
this Saturday when the straight foot-
ball, which has been Michigan's stanl-
by in the early games, will doubtless
be strengthened by a varied attack
that will include the best of Yost's
plays The aerial attack will be re-
sorted to in great measure, and from
start to finish, the Cornhuskers will
meet play after play, formation after
formation, that will test their de-
fense to the uttermost.
Boyd, the veteran lineman, will
doubtless hold the end position, he was
shifted to when Hanish was moved
back to the backfield. The big boy
is showing an aptitude for a flanking
job and has been developing a world
of speed the last few days. He covers
the kicks of Wieman and Sparks as
rapidly and as well as any man on
the squad. 'With Goetz and Boyd play-
ing the ends, both of whom weigh 184
pounds, Yost will have the heaviest
pair of flankers he has had since the
days of Conklin and Pontius in 1912.
Fortune to Play at Guard
Fortune has won a regularberth
now and will fill in at the guard pos-
ition vacated by Boyd. Goodsell and
Weske will continue to play the tack-
les, while Lambert gets first call for
center. In case Sparks does not ap-
pear Saturday, Weston will start the
game at quarter, according to Coach
Yost.
Assistant-coach Douglass, who saw
Nebraska play Saturday, has been n-
structing the Varsity how to break
up the Husker formations and how
best to gain against their defense.
Many of the new plays that Yost has
given out have been prepared for the
pirpose of getting through the defenso
of the western eleven.
Goodsell Showing Fine Form
Goodsell, a substitute guard and
tackle last year, is coming to the front
this season and promises to be one
of the strongest men on the Varsity
line, Pontius worked hard with this
wan in .1916, and after the season
was over, declared that Goodsell would
be a tower of strength in another

year. The prophecy of the former
Wolverine star seems destined to
come true. Goodsell has been the only
Michigan man all season to get down
under punts and he has been respon-
sible for about half the tackles after
*a kick.
The members of the Varsity eleven
are looking forward to the Nebraska
game, and although they are not pre-
dicting victory, for they realize the
strength of the Husker team, they de-
clare that they will be in the game
from start to finish and that the Ne-
braska players will know they have
been in a game when the contest is
over.
Ladies coats relined. Albert Gansle.
217 S. Main St. Upstairs opposite
Mack & Co.-Adv.

"MAULY"

,* ** *
*
* Michigan.
* 41
* 17 K
* 69
* 14 Uni
* 26

* * * * * * * *

ARSITY SCORES

Opponents.

Case
Alamazoo Normal
Mt. Union
iversity of Detroit
M. A. C.

0
13
0
3
0
16
* *

*x
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

ARRNGES MEETS FOR.
CROSS COUNTRY TEAM

82 MEN STILL PLAYING,
FOR NETCHAMPIONSHIP'
Bad Weather Prevents Play the Past
Few Days; Old Men
In Running.
In the tennis tournament now be-
ing played for the singles champion-
ship of the campus, there are 52 men
battling for the honors, and for the
doubles championship nine teams are.
disputing for the title.
In the first two rounds of the sin-
gles the following matches have yetj
to be played: Bowers vs. Bradley,
Sutton vs. Reindel, Tritchler vs. Ham-
er, Fitzpatrick vs. Bartz, Hummer vs.
Maloney, Gorin vs. Bumpus, Popp vs.
Brunquist.
There has been little tennis weather
since the playing began and for thisI
reason the men have not been held re-
.sponsible for the slow progress made,
but if the finals are to be played Sat-
urday, as intended,-there will be no
time to lose. There is much good ma-
terial on the courts and none of the
men should allow their matches to
go by default.
No doubles matches have been play-
ed yet, but since there are but nine
teams out, these can easily be played1
before Saturday, so that the finals in
both the singles and doubles can be
played off together.
The finals should be double inter-1
esting to followers of the game, be-;
ctuse not only will there be hard
fighting for the honors, in the tourna-
ment, but there will be an opportuni-,
ty to get in line on Michigan's pros-
pects after a year's silence in this
branch of athletics.
They will find several old men back,,
Hamer, Egbert, Steketee and a few
others; but the quality of the newcom-
ers is still not absolutely known, al-
though they have shown up well so
far. Harrison is playing a brand of ten-
nis that is going to worry the man who
faces him. Bartz has also been put-
ting up a fast game, but the question
is, what will these men do against
keener competition? There's gonna
be some fight.
Class dancing at the Packard Aca-
demy Monday and Thursday eve-
nings, 7:30 to 9:30. Private lessons
by appointment. Phone 1850-F1.
Dancing every Saturday at Arm-
ory from 9 to 12. Admission 75c.-Adv.
U. of M. Jewelry. J. L. Chapman's
is the place. 113 S. Main.-Adv.

,..

FIRST RACE

WILL BE RUN

She was one of those Regular Ath-
letes-you know the kind-carries a
man's size discus around in her pock-
et for flipping purposes and runs to
Ypsilanti and back every morning be-
fore breakfast to get in trim for a 7:30.
Surely you've met her; she came
out to Michigan last fall, just to get
athletic recognition. She knew she'd
get it anywhere. She wasn't the only
one that regretted her ineligibility for
football; F. H. knows we needed her.
So she won everything in sight,
wrote thrilling accounts' home, and
saw visions of a halftone print and a
full-page write-up in the Daily.

But ah the stuff that vis
are made of!
At the close of the season she
seven words in the southwest cor
of the last page.
To be sure, when her athletic
deavors warranted the wearing
bandages and crutches, some inter
ed soul might ask, "What ran o
her?" or "What time was it when
happened, anyway?" But worship
not in Ann Arbor!
After a long, long while some
appeared who had followed her car
and really appreciated her; he g
her a job-rolling Ferry Field.
There is a Balm in Gilead;

She Sighed or Glory And Fbut She Was

ATI

LANSING ON NOVEM-
BER 3

*167
* *

Totals
* * * * * * * *

0

CODWEATHER CHECKS
NEBRASKAIN PRACTICE
CORNHUSKERS GETTING READY
FOR WOLVERINE CLASH
SATURDAY
Lincon, Nebraska, Oct. 23.-With
heavy rains and the weather con-
tinually. growing colder, Coach
Stewart's gridders are being handi-"
capped in their final work-outs
for the coming Michigan clash. The
squad has been given light - signal
practice but the coach is worrying
since he cannot scrimmage his men
against the scrubs who have been
drilled in the Michigan formations
and shifts.
With positive knowledge that
Coach Yost will use several of his
men who have been on the hospital
list and especially Sparks, the speedy
quarter, Coach Stewart is perfecting
his defense to stop the quarter backs'
sensational end runs. The beefy line
is also getting individual attention to
offset the slowness of the backfield.
The lightest man on the squad is a
trifle over 170 and the extra pound-
age Coach Stewart believes will both-
er the Wolverines as it did the Notre
Dame team last Saturday.
It is rumored in the Nebraska camp
that Coach Yost has decided upon an-
other shift in an endeavor to play
several men, who have been shifted
in the earlier games, in their regular
positions. These shifts the Nebraska
followers figure are signs that the
Michigan meintor is worrying over
the clash Saturday.
"Sock-er", Latest
In door Sport

Michigan's cross-country team will
run their first race November 3 at
Lansing, when they will compete in
the" All-state meet.
All candidates for the team must re-
port at Ferry field Saturday at 10:30
o'clock, at which time the men will
be led over the five-mile course and
the first six finishing will go to Lans-
ing to represent the University.
November 17 a race will be run over
the five-mile course and the six run-
ners finishing first will represent
Michigan in the Conference C. C. C.
meet to be held at Evanston, Illinois,
November 24.
The leader across the finish line will
be the second to have his name in-
scribed on the Harpham trophy which
is hung in the Waterman gymnasium.
Eddie Carrol was the first to get the
honor when he won the race over
the five-mile course last spring.
The first three men completing the
course will get cups and the six which
will run at Evanston will get their
M. CC.C.
On November 17 the annual fresh-
man four-mile race will be run.

MITCHELL SEEKS NEW
SMASHIN6 FULBAC
FRESHMAN TEAM NEEDS LINE
PLUNGER FOR AGGIE GAME
ON SATURDAY
Many new men were given a chance
to prove their worth as a plunging
back to fill a hole in the All-fresh
backfield yesterday.
The inability of any of the regulars
to plow the line has caused Coach
Mitchell to make an effort to uncover
a man from his material to fill the
fullback position. Urschell and Bailey
can find the holes off tackles and ate
able to tear off some yards around
end on occasions and a man to make
a necessary two yards through th,
center of the line is being looked for,
to work with these two.
In this effort Mitchell has tried
Hobbs, a big linesman; Hobie, who has
been working out at center; Peocock,
star Detroit Central tackle; Stuart, the
heavyset former Grand Rapids Cen
tral end, and Gamble, a man from
South Dakota. Mitchell is continually
switching the back field around.
Saturday's game against M. A. C.
freshmen will be a hard one, as the
Aggie yearlings are said to be as
strong as at any time in the history
of the school. The Lansing .school

backers claimed after the defeat
the Farmers' varsity here last wE
that the agriculture college first y
team had a stronger offense than Y
their varsity. M. A. C. All-fresh h
Alma in their first game of the sea
two weeks ago.
CAMPAIGN TO FILL
VACANCIES BEGII
Training Companies Open Contest
Decide Best in Drill and
Athletics
A campaign was launched last ni
by all the members of the differ
military companies under Lieut. (
C. Mullen to fill the vacancies in
ranks by getting. their non-milit
friends to enroll.
The company who obtains the hi
est standing, both in drill work f
in athletics, will be presented a ha
some trophy before the close of
second semester. It is the aim of
campaigners to raise their compai
to full quota, so they can begin wo
ing systematically for the prize.
Regular drill will be held on Fe
field Thursday and Friday afternoc
In addition to the drill, the athlf
program will be carried out.

There is always an oppprtun
increase your business though
advertising. Try it.-Adv.

0 1 4 r 1 Y Y

Mr. Student!

* * * * * * * * * * * * * ** ** * * * * * * * * * *-* *

* WILL YOU HELP THE CAMP CUSTER GYMNASIUM *
FUND BY SELLING COPIES OF DOUGLASS' BOORT *

It is unnecessary for us to give you the usual oration about

k

*
*
*

Michigan students have been asked to cooperate- in the sale of the *
book "Football Made Plain to the Spectator" at the coming games in *
Ann Arbor, the proceeds from the sale to be turned over to the camp *
Custer Gymnasium Fund to aid athletics at the cantonment. *
This book, which was written by assistant-coach Douglass in collab- *
oration with Elmer Burrell, sells for 10 cents, and contains valuable *
information concerning the game, its essential parts, and facts neces- *
sary to' the understanding of football. The state of Michigan has *
pledged itself to buy 50,000 of these books, and students at the Univer- *
city are asked to sell 5,000 copies this fall.
Elmer Burrell, who is chairman of the Football Committee of the *
Camp Custer Gymnasium Fund, has asked the Daily to secure the -
services of a group of Michigan students who shall offer the book for *
sale before and during the games on Michigan's schedule this fall. *
There is no remuneration for the task, but there is an opportunity to *
aid at Camp Custer. *
If you will give your time to this cause, communicate with the *
sporting editor of The Daily at once, and plans will be made imme- *
diately to put copies of "Football Made Plain To the Spectator" in *
your hands. *
* * * * * * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * *

good clothes.

It is an old song and we are no singers, but

famous ADLER-ROCHESTER CLOTHES will look
good to you, because clothes are the outward sign ofi a man's
stability. ,The price range is $20, $22.50, $25, $28, $30.
It will be a satisfaction for you to see them at the

LUTZ CLOTHING CO.

2 1 7 So. Main St.

"The Ann Arbor Store for Men"

* r

"Sock-er," the latest indoor sport
for women, has made its debut in the
Women's Athletic department.
This fascinating pastime owes its
origin nhiefiy to the high cost of gal-
oshes, which has driven all but the
most rabid enthusiasts $from the ten-
nis courts and hockey fields, during the
freshman rains. Like golf, the game
is played for an indefinite number of
holes, and it resembles tennis in that
good service is required, axd returns
expected.
All of which introduces the reader to
the co-operative sock darning bureau.
Seriously speaking, however, an or-
ganization of this kind is being spoken
of among the University women as a
means of earning money for Liberty
bonds. Socks could be left at the bu-
reau by those unfortunately deprived
of maternal solitude, and would be
returned very shortly-whole.
Of course, the details of the organ-
ization are rather indefinite as yet, so
watch the sport page for further de-
velopments.
You can get those Neolin Soles put
on at Paul's Place, 611 E. William,
Phone 237.-Adv.

GOOD THINGS TO EAT
AND A PLACE THAT IS CLEAN

t

We pride ourselves on serving food that is fit
served in a place that is attractive and in a way

A A prepared
that will plea.

in a kitchen that is clean and

THE RENELLEN HOSPICE
A PLACE OF DISTINCTIVE SERVICE

Is'not a hash house A . neither
a long ways from being a restaurant.

is
.

it a

beanery nor yet a regular boarding house and it if
It is a place that is different and an idea of my own.

Thesar. a lot of things the Raaellon is not. but
of one thing I am sure: it is a good pla to sat.

ig wax in any sized packages.
Lior & Co.-Adv.
our alarm clocks at J. L
n's, Jeweler. 113 S. Main.

I

e na s.

n..n

III

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