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October 03, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-03

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WEATHER
FAIR AND
COLDER

AV 4iw
m4li A!a
tr t an

ijait

ASSOCIATEI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT W
SERVICE

No. 2

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3,. 1917

PRICE THREE

_ _

OPEN HOUSEI
IRES SUCCESS
ITH YEARLINGS
EN LEARN "VICTORS,"
ARSITY" AND YELLS;
ATHLETES TALK
IEN URGE FROSH
TRYOUT IN SPORTS
e University Game Squarely,"
Exhortation of Professor
Henderson
te the ravages of sophomores
var path, the University Y. M.
eld its scheduled open house
limen last night in Lane hall,
yearlings were given primary
on in Michigan life to the ac-
ment of '20 years. Music, ad-
Aation, and yells held sway for
men in their first big meeting

Union Opera Sure
Says Homer Heath
Presentation at Camp Custer Possible;
Chicago Alumni Pledge Sup-
porty, Plans Go On
Students who have had a doubt in
their minds as to whether there would
,be a Michigan Union opera this year
may know that their fears are un-
founded.
"Although the war has taken of our
men," said Mr. Homer Heath, of the
Union, "and we don't know just where
we stand, we are going right ahead
with our plans for this year's opera.
A few people doubt'the advisibility of
having one at this time, but the alumni
of Chicago. and other cities promise
support.
"There is a possibility that the opera
will be given at Camp Custer, in the
new theater now being built there.
This feature alone would make the
opera worth producing. And a Michi-
gan Union opera is too much of an
Ann Arbor institution to be abolished."
HOLD ANNUAL TRADITIONS
MEETING FOR 1921- MEN
ALL CLASSES TO BE ADMITTED
UPON PRESENTATION OF
ATHLETIC COUPON

he accompaniment of the Rhodes
Hers' orchestra the Michigan men
future rehearsed "The Victors"
Varsity," and at intervals dur-
e evening a number of the yells
practised, under the leadership
E. Storz, '19. Newton C. Fetter,
ary of the "Y," acted as chair-
during the absence of the presi-
M. Sparks, '19E, varsity football
was introduced as the rst speak
the evening and urged upon all
it the necessity of getting proper
.se if they expected to work ef-
ly in the classroom.
E. E. Wiemann Speaks
E. Wiemann, '19, varsity football
was the next man on the pro-
He told the men of '21 that
had an important part to take
ear on the campus due to the
it crisis, exhorting them to take
part in the proper way. "There
m on the athletic field for all of
said Wiemann. "Don't be back-
in displaying your ability."
. Attwood, '18E, president of the
nt council, discussed the various
ies into which the Michigan man
mnter, advising the men to get
classroom work first and then
to the other .work Following
twood, R. T. McDonald, '18,
of The Michigan Daily, declared
o man would get more out of
niversity than he put into it.
work of the Michigar",Union
xplained by Frank Bacon, '63. At
ose of his talk Mr. Bacon em-
ed the fact that Michigan spirit
hat of citizenship,aand conse-
[y the Michigan man must be
Sby the service which he ren-
in this line.
C. T. Johnston of the engi-
Lg school and Prof. W. D. Hen-
of thephysics department rep-
ed the faculty at the open house,
rofessor Johnston's advice to the
nen was that they should ask
ons when in doubt. "Obtain a
understanding of. things," he
i closing.
vish I were once more a fresh-
declared Professor Henderson,
had the privilege of lining up
culty before me. I should say
in, 'Faculty, know your stu-
I should also wish them to
e that I was playing the game
L On the other hand I urge
get icquainted with the faculty,
st of all I say, get acquainted
ourself. If you don't know your-
ou have missed the mark."
TLE INCREASE
)N MINERS' PAY

Michigan's annual reception for her
freshman class is planned to be held
at 7 o'clock Friday evening in Hill
auditorium. The affair, which will
be in the form of a mass meeting, is
to be given under the auspices of
the Michigan Union, with George F.
1-lurley, '18L, as chairman of the
committee.
At 7 o'clock the doors will be
thrown open to the freshmen, who
will be admitted only if wearing their
class caps. At 7:30 o'clock the doors
will open to the general student body,
who will receive admittance upon pre-
sentation of their athletic books. The
freshmen are to occupy the middle
sections of the main floor, and uper-
'classmen will be seated in the sec-
tions on either side of the freshmen.
The remainder will be accommodated
in the first balcony. It is the intention
of the committee in charge to invite
",the citizens of Ann Arbor and have
them occupy the second, balcony.
The program will includespeeches
by Prof. Halph W. Aigler, Prof. Wil-
liam Henderson, and Lieut. G. C. Mul-
len, campus and faculty men, as well
as a full share of cheering and sing-
ing, After the mass meeting, the
freshmen will march to the Union
building, whre doughnuts, smokes,
and music will be in order.
ENGLISH WOMEN "DO BIT"
Replace Men Successfully in Govern-
ment Services
(By Associated Press.)
London, Oct. 2.--One million two
hundred and fifty-six thousand women
are today doing work in England
which was done formerly by men who
have joined the army or been set free
for other forms of war service. The
figures are taken from the latest of-
tilial report of the industrial branch
of the board of trade.
Replacement of men by women has
been most successful, says the report,
in government services, in banking,
and in transportation. In government
establishments, aside from the civil
service and local government, the
number of women employed prior to
the war was 2,000; now it is 198,000.
The board of trade reports show
that there are now 4,538,000 women
and girls employed in the classified
trades under its jurisdiction. This
does not include domestic servants,
women employed in small workshops,
and women employed on farms; nor
does it include women at work in mili-
tary, naval, and Red Cross hospitals.
It is estimated therefore, that the to-
tal number of women employed in all
occupations in England today is well
over 5,000,000.
Tunisia Wants Mine Machinery
A firm in Tunisia has inquired about
mining machinery and explosives of
American make.
Disk harrows for use in banana cul-
tivion would find a ready market in

SCHOOL.IN AVIATION
OPENS WEDNESDAY
All Michigan Students Except First
Year Men Eligible to
Enroll
TO TEACH THEORY OF FLYING
TO ALL WHO ELECT COURSE
Meeting to Be Held Tonight Under
Direction of Curtis Air-
plane Expert
To give men who plan to enter avia-
tion an opportunity to learn the fun-
damentals of flying, an elementary
course in aeronautics has been in-
stalled'in the engineering department.
It is open to men in the second, third
or fourth year classes of all colleges.
The principals governing flight, dis-
tinguishing features between various
types of planes and varieties of con-
trols will be taught in the course.No
attempt will be made to give any prac-
tical work as there will not be a ma-
chine here, but the theory of flying
will be presented in such language
that men who have not had engineer-
ing or advanced mathematics can un-
derstand t.
Men who wish to enroll in the course
should meet at 3 o'clock this afternoon
in room 336 engineering building.
Assistant Professor Felix W. Paw-
lowski will present the work, assisted
by W. F. Gerhardt, a graduate of the
department, who has been working in
the experimental department of the
Curtis Aeroplane company.
The offer of the University to teach
student aviators enlisted in govern-
ment service the fundamentals of fly-
ing has not yet been accepted by the
government, which plans to assign en-
listed men to schools for instruction.
When the offer was made, military
training had not yet been established
at Michigan and for this reason it was
not accepted, but now that the train-
ing is in the curriculum it is expected
the government will avail itself of the
offer.
Advanced course on aeronautics are
being offered to students of the en-
gineering college.
Organizations on
Scholarship Chart
Alpha Epsilon Iota Leads All Fra-
ternities and Sororities on
Standing
Alpha Epsilon Iota sorority, the only
professional sorority listed, lead all
fraternities, sororities, and clubs in
scholarship for the year of 1916-17, ac-
cording to the annual scharship,
chart prepared by the University.
Among the general fraternities Phi
Sigma Kappa held first place with
Sigma Nu and Phi Delta Theta holding
close second and third respectively.
Phi Sigma Kappa held third place dur-
ing 1915-16 with an average of schol-
arship almost equal to the standard;
maintained last year.
Collegiate Sorosis held first place
among the general sororities with a
standing equal to the standing of Phi
Delta Phi which leads the professional
fraternities by several points.
Alpha Phi stands second among the;
general sororities with Phi Beta Phi,
third. Both of these sororities crowd
the leader of this class very closely.
Second in the professional frater-
nities comes Alpha Kappa Kappa while,

Nu Sigma Nu holds third place. Neith-
er of these, however, are very close
rivals of the Phi Delta Phi has al-
most a B average.
First place among the other men's
clubs is taken by Trigon. The Monks;
and Eremites are close rivals for sec-
ond place, but the Monks have nosed
out their rivals by a fraction of a
grade.
Several fraternities and houses did
not send in a statement of their schol-
arship although requested three sep-
arate times to do so by the Universitya
authorities. These clubs are Kappa
Beta Psi, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Chi
Delta, Pi Lambda Phi, Sigma Upsilon
psi, Philalathean club, J. F. Adams
house, Caswell house, Converse house,
McLouth house, Palms house and
Wheeler house.
An, agency for telephone accessories
is wanted by a fic in Spain.

PROFESSOR-EMERITUS BRADLEY
M. THOMPSON
PRDF.TOMPSON'S FNERAL
HELD TUESDAYFROM HOME
SERVICES BY LOYAL LEGION OF
DETROIT; FORMER ASSOC-
IATES PALLBEARERS
The funeral of Professor-emeritus
Bradley M. Thompson, holder of the
,Jay chair of law in the University,
was held at the home, 539 E. Univer
sity avenue, Tuesday afterhoon at 3
o'clock.
Prof. Thompson had been a mem-
ber of the Loyal Legion of Detroit, and
the casket was draped with the flag
of the legion. In addition to the Rev.
Mr. Tatlock, Chaplain Towne of the
legion officiated.
There were six honorary, and six
regular pallbearers. The latter in-
cluded Professors Drake, Goddard,
Wenley, and A. G. Canfield, and
Messrs. J. D. Ramsey and A. F. Free-
man. The honorary pallbearers were
Professors Bunker, Wilgus, Bogle,
Lane, Hindsdale, and Major Soule.
Among those present at the funeral,
in addition to a. large number of the
members of the Loyal Legion from De-
troit, were Judge C. B. Grant and ex-
Regent Barbour.
Burial took place -in Forest Hill
cemetery.
WAACS PROVING POPULAR
Pursue Non-Combatant Duties Under
Army Discipline
(By Associated Press.)
Boulogne, France, Oct. 3.-The
Waacs have ceased to be a novelty in
this part of France. Waacs, be it
known, is a time-saving designation
for members of the Women's Auxiliary
Army Corps.
Their neat khaki uniforms dot the
cobbled streets during working hours,
and afterward, sprinkle the nearly
country roads, frequently under mas-
culine escort which indicates that they
are popular with the male branch of
the army.
The army has got so used to newv
developments that even the first ap-
pearance of the Waacs aroused but a
passing sensation. Nevertheless they
are in their way a curiosity, something
really new in the history of soldiers
and soldiering. These organized bat-
talions of uniformed women for non-
combatant duties are a direct product
of the new warfare which is fought
not only by the soldier and won not
only in the field.
This army life which the Waacs are
leading is real army life, under real
army discipline, in real army barracks,
and it wiil1eave its mark on the
woman who has lived it, just as truly
as army life will leave its mark for
years upon the manhood of England
and America.
During the first month or two of her
life here, the Waac suffers seriously
from home-sickness. Considering her
newness to barrack conditions, this is
not to be wondered at. There is none
of the privacy of the home in barracks,
and close quarters with seven-or more
to a bed rooin, is not suited to every
temperament. For most girls fresh
from the comforts' of home, there is a
shaking-down process which frequent-
ly requires several weeks before the
ache of home-sickness is conquered

and~h Ld'ual dateb~>''o

Verdants. Get a
Touch of College
Sophs Sni. Serenel as Fearful
FreshmanrFeign Stage
Fright
Ruth St. Denis or Lady Godiva posi-
tively were not at large upon the
streets of Ann Arbor last evening. If
your glance encountered a mussed up
figure, bareheaded and barelegged,
with a dying gladiator expression, the
chances are a hundred to one that it
was some luckless frosh who wan-
dered from the fold and was accord-
ingly gobbled.
The sophs were at large-very much
so-while the nocturnal wanderers of
1921 were largely in Porosknit and
Munsing wear. Many a stray wearer
of the gray cap was forced to roll up
his trousers, don his coat and vest
wrong side out and be towed about in
the pellucid rays of the dying moon by
a husky and obliging escort.
Thrilling escapes,' marathons for
that little old room on the third floor
and wild bursts of speed for the tropic
of Capricorn under a heavy barrage
fire were witnessed by the campus
spirits. Today if you see one of the
verdants chewing Smith Brothers'
cough drops or carrying an atomizer,
you know the why's and wherefores.
THIRD SELECTED GROU
NOF FOR CANTONMENTS
NO DECISION FOR SECOND DRAFT
CALL HAS BEEN
MADE
Washington, Oct. 2.-The third con-
tingent of th'e national army men will
begin moving tomorrow to the sixteen
cantonments . where approximately
one-half of the 687,000 selected men
called out by the president have been
already mobilized.
Quotas now ready to leave home
vary greatly, following from 17 to 40
per cent of the full state quota with
a general average of between 20 and
25 per cent. Secretary of War Baker
indicated that no decision had been
reached as to when the second call
will be made. The physical examina-
tion of the selected men by army phy-
sicians at the camp have resulted in
many rejections. The decision of the
war department that the remaining
seven million men be examined im-
mediately and classified for service
awaits action by congress on the war
deficiency bill.
MICHIGAN UNION FACTOR
IN WAR PREPARATIONS1
"The Michigan Union is becoming
the center of many war activities.
Thus it is establishing a relation be-
tween the University and the nation,
at the same time increasing the fa-
cilities for war preparation,"- said
Francis Bacon,.'02, recently.
"The building now is being used by
the army stores students for class
purposes. The completion of the new
building will be opportune, since the
University will be hard pressed, as
the war continues, for space to accom-
modate engines, airplanes, and other
equipment essential to military in-
struction. In addition, the Union
might well be used to house men de-
tailed for war work.
"The Union as a campus social cen-

ter will be headquarters for wounded
soldiers, as they may be brought to
Ann Arbor for treatment and con-
valescence. The social relations which
develop from the smokers and enter-
tainments will do much to break down
artificial barriers and democratize stu-
dents and soldiers alike,, Facilities
for recreation are necessary. More
than any other thing does this em-
phasize the necessity of the immediate
completion of the new Michigan U'nion
home.
"In May the Michigan Union branch
of the Intercollegiate Intelligence bu-
reau received a call for two ambulance
units. Six weeks later three units
were enlisted and sent to Allentown,
Pa. The number in each unit has
been increased to 45.
"Thus the Univ'ersity is maintaining
;t- piace withm otihor sc 'nJ
(ountry from the point oY vi'w of m r-
nishig v:olunt'e rs'"

BIG GUNS SMASH
GERMAN lCOUNTERS
ON BRITISH [INES
HUN DEFEAT ACCOMPANIED BY
HEAVY LOSSES IN
MEN
CROWN PRINCE DRIVES
AT HAIG NEAR YPRES
English Victory Over Turks In Meso.
potamia Greater Than
Announced
AY
(By Associated Press.)
With the British in France and Bel-
gium, Oct. 2.-Two more counter at-
tacks were attempted by the Germans
against the British lines near the
;Minine road last night, but asin the
case of three heavy assaults made
during the day the enemy -,was !
smashed by artillery and rifle fire.
Hard local fighting occurred at the
place known as Camerone House
where the Germans yesterday forced
the British back slightly but with the
exception of two small positions lost
in this area the British line was en-
camped there this morning.
The last 24 hours have been bitter,
ones for the enemy along the Ypres
battle front. Not only have the Ger-
mans suffered a stinging defeat but
this defeat has been accompanied by
heavy losses in men.
The Crown Prince of Bavaria con-
tinues to deal strong attacks against
Field Marshal Haig around Ypres.
These attacks are being centered upon
the section of Haig's line which is
crowding toward the Ostend-Lille rail-
way.
The Germans have made valiant ef-
forts to regain positions taken by the
British in the recent offensive but ex-
cept on two small points they have
been repulsed. The French and- Ger-
mans are engaged in violent artillery
duels along the Aisne front and the
Verdun sector in both of which re-
gions the French armies have success-
fully withstood vicious attacks from
the crown prince.
In Mesopotamia the British victory
over the Turks west of Bagdad was
greater than was reported at first. In
addition to capturing the town nearly
4,000 Turks were made prisoners and
a large number of guns and war sup-
plies were taken.
CONGRESS ADOPTS
WAR TAX MEA.SURE
Speedy Work of House Augurs for
Adjournment by Next
Week
Washington, Oct. 2.-Congress fin-
ished its work on the great war tax
bill today.
Following the example set by the
house yesterday, the senate adopted
the conference report without a roll
call. More than $2,500,000,000 in new
taxes are levied by the measure which
has been in the making since last
April.
As soon as the bill is 'signed and In-
closed tomorrow by Vice-President
Marshall and Speaker Clark it will be
sent to President Wilson who is ex-
pected to sign it immediately.

The speedy work of the house on
the conference report raised the hope
adjournment on Saturday or not later
than next week.
"MELTING BANKERS" IS
CAMP CUSTER "HORROR"
Battle Creek, Oct. 2.-Extraordinary
reductions are being accomplished at
Camp Custer-mostly in avoirdupois.
Bankers, lawyers and other profes-
sional and business men find going
from an uncertain fifty to a perfect
36 more work than play. Their "car-
[casses are melting" as one soldier ex-
pressed it.
More than that, the blisters worn on
their hands during the first few days
in camp are growing into rough. cal-
lused places. Their nails do not have
the former brilliant luster and oc-
casionally a fly alights in their food.
13ut thoxy~ gri d bear a: this, con-
e'1'ring it "'jud aLnQ!.er hardship ot

Given in Consideration
Higher Coal Prices
Soon Due

of

in, Oct. 2.-A full agree-
eached tonight as to the
increases to be given
ordinary labor in a con-
among miners. Pick and
ers who demand 15 cents
rease in pay will get 10
on and unskilled labor
t a wage raise of $1.90 a

ases were granted by
;tingent in their ob-
r coal prices which
el administration to
nes next wcek. 1

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