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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 03, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, 00

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
Officia newspaper at the University :of:
Michigan . Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the postoffce at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices:Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier, $2.50; "by mail, $3.00.
Want ad stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta. Phones: Business, 960;
Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, f left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library,,where the
evening.
Robert T. McDonald.....Managing Editor
C. Philip Emery..........Business Manager
Harold Makinso...... Advertising Manager
Pal E. Cholette......Publication Manager
Bernard WOhW........ Circulation Manager
Harold R. Smith...... . Credit Manager
Wm. M. LeFevre..........Office Manager
J. Ellsworth Robinson.;Subscription Manager
NIGHT EDITORS
Bruce A. Swaney H ames Schermerhorn, Jr.
Harry Carey C. S. Clark, Jr.
Clarence tL. Roeser
REPORTERS
Albert E. Horne, Jr. Bruce . Miller
Philip C. Pack Harry W. Weinerman
,Denman H. Cruttenden Edgar L. Rice
Mildred C. Mighell Mark K. Ehbert
Eugene Given
BUSINESS STAFF
L. A. Storrer Orville E. Gates
Win. A. Leitzinger. Harry D. Hause
Dale H. Baad Lambert Hirsheimer
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1917
Night Editor-Herbert G. Wilson
M~en who are desirous of working
on The Daily editorial or business
staffs, especially those who have had
experience, are requested to report at
The :Daily offices between 2 and 3:3
o'clock today.
BROAD SHOULDERS
Again gray caps with dinky buttons
of many colors dot the campus hori-
zon. Again the lofty brow of the
senior is wrinkled as he explains to a
shrinking figure that you cannot take
shower baths in University hall or
that the Museum does not take in
roomers this year.
These small differences are soon
adjusted, and the equilibrium of the
entering student is soon restored.
The University is facing many dif-
ficulties this year. The gory hand of
Mars has plunged indifferently into
the quiet world of the campus and
taken from both faculty and students
men of the highest rank. And upon
those that remain a heavy burden has
been placed.
You will have to be men now, fresh-
men You will have to have broad
shoulders. Never forget while at
work or at play that men whose jolly
comraderie would have helped you
solve many a problem are engaged in
deadly work at the front or driving a
battle scarred ambulance to lend the
hand of mercy while Death's blows
strike right and left upon the road.
It is to take the part of those men
that your education has been offered
you. The chance to make yourself
worthy of your college and your coun-
try is open. It will take broad shoul-
ders and an iron jaw to learn to carry
your responsibilities so early, but we
are betting on you, freshmen.
t WE'RE ALL MICHIGAN MEN

vicious or otherwise, as Michigan wo-
, "en care to make it.
There are two remedies. The first
Is to try out for The Daily and help
to swell the volume of women's news.
,That takes hard work and a certain
Amount of talent.
of affairs which works for the mutu-
every woman in the University.
Subscribe for The Daily.
That takes just $2.50.
Freshmen, are you wearing the lat-
test styles in caps? The frosh cap is
worn exclusively among '21 circles
this fall.
Since the School of Music has moved
back into its new "soundproof" resi-
dence the din appears to be fifty per
cent louder.
Bolts are handy things for doors,
but lack strength and durability when
applied to cutting classes.
Whyaworry about arlittle five dollar
bill that a fellow borrows from you
and forgets to return? Why, lots of
students borrow tens and forget to re-
turn them.
w~lmen
Women wishing to try -out on ed-
itorial or business staffs of The Daily
report at the offices in the Press build-
jng on Maynard street between 1 and
2 o'clock, or call Mildred Mighell,
'18, at 2276-J, and leave name, ad-
dress) and telephone number.
Experienced knitters are asked'to
call at the Armory for yarn to be used
in Red Cross work only.
Freshman physical examinations
are being given this week. All ap-
pointments must be kept.
Registration 'for freshman and
,sophomore gymnasium classes closes
tonight.
The course in military marching
will be given at 3 o'clock on Wed-
nesdays and playground at 2 o'clock
on the same day. These classes,
together with those in aesthetic danc-
ing, will begin about Nov. 15.
Any upperclass girl may elect
hockey by signing up in the list in
Barbour gymnasium. Raw material is
desired as well as experienced play-
ers.
Women's league "stunt" party and
"get-together" for freshmen Friday
ight, Oct. 8.
Tennis players who expect to come
out for the tournament should sign
up at Barbour gymnasium.
The Gargoyle would like to have
some women out who can write or
draw. Report at the Gargoyle office,
second floor of the Press building, be-
tween 2 and 4 o'clock in the afternoon.
All old members of the Girls' Glee
club are requested to notify Marion
Galton, 'phone 627, before Saturday,
Oct. 6, if thf(y intend to continue
membership the coming year. An-
nouncement of tryouts will be pub-
ished in The Daily.
REGENTS' BICYCLE RIDING
LAW TO BE ENFORCED
Enforcement of the law of the Re-
.gents prohibiting the riding of bicyc-
,les on campuswalks is to be started
At once, according to a statement of
Superintendent Flook of the buildings
and grounds department of the Uni-
versity.
At present, offenders are merely
warned not to repeat the offense,
but in the future offenders will be

prosecuted.
i Two years ago the Regents ruled
that fast riding of bicycles on campus
walks was forbidden. This proved to
be insufficient. A year ago a new rul-
ing was passed stopping entirely the
,riding on the campus.
It is the present intention to stop
offenders at once.
REGISTRATION FIGURES SHOW
THAT MEN OUTNUMBER WOMEN
Women are not to outnumber men in
the literary college during the ensu-
ing year, frequent rumors to the con-
trary notwithstanding.
Figures obtainable at the office of
the registrar last night show that the
enrollment of women is almost iden-
tical with that of last year at this
time, while the men have fallen off
about 25 per cent. Nearly a thousand
women have filled out registration
blanks as against some 1,400 men.
Registrar A. G. Hall stated that a
considerable increase in both of these
totals is epected in the last day and
a half of registration, although it is
unlikely that proportional and relative
statistics will undergo much change..
Laboratory coats, apitons and .sup-
plies at Wahr's University Bookstore.
A.

Liberty Loan for
Rich Nan, Poor
frlan,and You Too

Let's All Take
Back Seats Now

IBO O

K

S

The second Liberty loan has beena
launched.
All over the United States inthet
tiniest hamlets and the largesti
cities - from the Atlantic to the
Pacific coasts-through the rural andt
urban districts alike-machinery hasT
been set in uinoon and human ener-
gies released to fill, democracy's war
chest with three billions of dollars.;
Three billion dollars must be re-
cruited by Oct. 27th and treasury de-
partment officials hope that an over1
subscription of two billions will oc-
cur. Optimism reigns in the office of
Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo at;
Washington.
School bells, gongs and factory
whistles have sounded their call in the
great financial drive, and the same en-
thusiastic spirit is seconding the ef-
forts of the twelve federal reserve
zones to exceed in'number and amount
of subscriptions their previous good
records.
A rate of four per cent interest with
valuable tax exemptions will be paid
upon America's new bond issue, the
highestyin the financial history of the
country. The second Liberty loan will
differ from the first in a great many
ways. It is fairer to the humble
purchaser, the farmer, the laboring
man, as,well as the wealthy investor,
and will appeal to them more. It
will be saleable "tentdays after the
present beginning of the campaign."
Easy terms of payment, a higher in-
terest, and the tax exemptions are an
inducement.
FROSH HAPPY WITH
TWO ATTRACTIONS
Leaving Comfortable Sofas Just Like
Breaking Off Home
Ties
"Well, I've signed up for the 'Y'
and I'm wearing a Michigan Union
button besides.
"Now how in the ,Sam Hill am I
going to hang around both places and
still maintain my neutrality? I guess
those membership campaign guys
picked me out as easy picking, but I
believe I got my money's worth after
all.
"The other day I went over to the
Union building. At first all the fel-
lows looked alike to me, but after a
while I knew quite a few of them.
Somehow, everybody seemed to be at
home there, and I soon felt the same
way. I found a paper from my home
town, and, believe me, it made good
reading.
"Last night I went around to Lane
hall, the University 'Y' building. I sat
down on one of those big sofas, and
when I went to get up, I felt like I
was breaking the last of the 'home
ties.' The fellow that made that fur-
niture must have known his business.
"One of the boys I met over there
was the guild president of the church
I belong to. He invited me to come
over to the guild house and meet the
crowd.
"Take it from me, I'm glad I joined
the Union and the 'Y'."

"To let-the first five rows of or-4
chestra seats at the "Maj." Occup-
ants must be beyond the age of ver-j
dancy and must have, at some time in
their lives, come in contact with civ-
ilization."
So saith the "freshman bible"-but
in other words. Strictly speaking, in
the diction of the "good book", fresh-
men are not allowed to inhabit the
"bald-headed" rows. What pangs
there will be in the verdants' hearts
wvhen they are forced to remain a
number of feet distant from the stage
while Princess Imafoola dances Sa-
lome a la Hawaii. And while a group
of scantily-clad wood nymphs inter-
pret the "Beautiful Blue Danube"
after the fashion of Isadora Duncan
Ah, sad is thy lot, unsophisticated
invader of the regions of learning.
LEGUMES HARD HIT
Restaurants to Observe One Meatless
Day a Month
The shades of Drs. Fletcher and
Wiley,first advocaters of thevegeter-
ian idea, may yet fall on their ideal,
a meatless nation.
The manager of the L. and L. hotel
states that it and all other hotels and
restaurants in Ann Arbor are to ob-
serve one meatless day a month.
Upon interview the meat dealers say
that this condition will injure their
business to quite an extent.
College Women Needed by Government
College women who are anxious to
aid the country in the present crisis
are urged by the Council for National
Defense to equip themselves for posi-
tions as stenographers, typists, and
clerks.
Those entering this branch of the
federal service must take the regular
examinations. Information and ap-
plication blanks will be supplied by
the secretary of the civil service com-
mission, Washington, D. C.
Dental Classes Remain About Normal
The total freshmen enrollment in
the College of Dental Surgery will be
about 85, of which five are girls.
While the seniors have lost quite a
few of their number through the war,
the registration in the lower classes
will be about the same as in other
years, the total enrollment of the col-
lege being near 300.
Work will begin today, as all but a
few have been classified and enrolled
in their proper classes.
Receive 800 Books for Soldiers
Approximately 800 books for sold-
iers have been coming into the Li-
brary steadily. These books include
text-books, fiction, and other works.
The campaign for funds for the camp
libraries will not be actively carried
out until about Oct. 15.
Bass Soloist wanted for church pos-
ition. Call 312 S. Division, Phone
212-J.-Adv.
Gym suits $1.00-no advance-Wag-
ner & Co. State St. at Liberty.-Adv.

NEW AND SECOND HAND
FOR ALL DEPARTMENTS
Engineering Supplies
Drawing Instruments

STATE I AH'
ST RE ET!H'

M

ENGINEERING TOOLS
ALARM CLOCKS
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES
SWITZ WER'IS
STATE STREET HARD WAWE
VNIVERSITY
T XT BOOK S
NEW AND SECOND HAND
DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
SUPPLIES OF ALL JINDS
he 41ater Book S-Shod
]'hone 430 33 6 S. Stt. es+

We have both the inclination and{
the equipment to furnish the
best in banking service
The Ann Arbor Sayings Bank
INCORPORATED I869
Capital and Surplus $ 500,000.00
Resources . . . $4,000,000.00
Northwest Corner Main and
Huron Streets
707 North University Avenue

HANDY INFORMATION FOR
ANN ARBOR TRAVE
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jac
Dtot(Effective May 22, 19[7)
Detit Limited and Express Cars--7
in., 8 :1o a. in., and hourly to 7 :1oP. in
p. n1.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. n
every two hours to 6:48 p. ;M.; to Li
8:48 P. in.
Jackson Express Cars ;local stops n
Ann Arbor)--9:48 a. in. and eve.y two
to 7:48 v. m.
Local Cars East Bound-5 :35 a. mn.
a. in., 7:05 a. in. and every two lhoa3 rs t
p. ni.. 8:o5 p. m., 9:o5 p. in., Io:co
To Ypsilanti only. 9:20 a. n.. 9:;o
2:o5 p. m.. 6:os p. n, 9:45 p. in. :43
12:20 a. in. 1:1o a. in.. 1:2o a. m.. ro
change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:os5 a. w.
a. m.. 10:2n o. m., 12:20 a. in.

Quarry
Drug Co. s
Prescription
Store

I

H its anything Pho
graphic ask S W A
713 East University A
L. C. SMITH,
CORONA,
UNDERWOOD
and other high
grade type-
writers.
FOR SALE
and RENT
Fraternity and Social Stationery
MIMEOGRAPHING and PRINTIN
TYPEWRITING
0. D. MORRILL
322 South State St.
(Over Baltimore Lunch)
Michigan Memory Books, S
Books, Banners, Pennants, Jew
etc., etc., at Wahr's.-Adv.
Officers' Uniforms and accesse
G. H. Wild & Co., State Street.-

Cor. State

St. and N, University
Phone 308

-

Waiters' and Laboratory aprons and
coats. Cushing's Pharmacy.-Adv.
Af
Opening assembly at Armory Sat-
urday night. Dancing 9 to 12.-Adv.
Patronize Our Advertisers.-Adv.

That sophomore
down State street-
hard taskmaster,

who chased you
last night was a
wasn't he, fresh-I

Those sophomores who gave you a
bath, and incidentally forgot all about
the warm water- they were very
forgetful how they felt about it lastj
year, weren't they?.
Those second year men who have
been applying the paddle for the past'
several days are a bad bunch, too,
aren't they?
But when you see these same men
on the street this morning remem-j
ber they are Michigan men. They!
stand ready to help you out of your
difficulties. They had them once.
They know what they are. If you1
want to know what to do, when to do
it, how to do it, go,to one of the upper'
classmen,-yes, even the sophomores.
They were all freshmen once.
WOMEN!
Not onE. woman in five in the Uni-
versity of VIicIhigan subscribes for
The Daily, the official newspaper,
Whether this situation springs from
great general indifference among wo-
men as to what is going on, or, as has
been suggested, from superior natur-
al patience in waiting for a turn at
the copy of some one else, it is a state
The second is within the reach of
al harm of The Daily and the women
of its reading public.
Women say that they are not pro-
portionately represented in its news
columns. Let them remember that
they are not proportionately repre-
sented on the subscription lists either.
Each -oidition is the cause and effect
of th, oTher a ihe vcs'l m a

FORMER FORESTRY PROFESSOR
NOW OPERATING FRUIT FARM
. M

Russell Watson of Washington
versity Named as Suc-
cessor

Uni-

0. L. Sponsler former associate
professor in the forestry department
of the literary college has resigned
his position, and is operating a fruit
farm at Delhi, Michigan.
In Professor Sponsler's stead, Rus-
sell H. Watson of the University of
Washington, has been named. Wat-
son received a master's degree at
Michigan last June. He has had
forestry experience at Alaska, Ore-
gon, California, and Washington.
EDGAR R. THEISS, '16
TO WED BETTY PEYTON
Edgar Raymond Theiss, '16, now a
lieutenant in the signal corps, an-
nounces his marriage to Betty Pey-
ton, on Saturday the 16 of October.
Fritz Holtkamp, varsity center at
Ohio State last year, was saved this
summer from suspicions of being a
spy by displaying the gold football
that he won while on the team. The
authorities in Canada decided that
Western Conference championships do
not grow in Berlin.
The Kemfp Music Studio: Piano,
,Organ, Voice Culture. 312 S. Division
Pht r 12- J.Atv.

--trtRgh-
lilltltllllllltlll lllltilllllllll1t U1111 Iitl lllltlllil ll1llil ll lll ll1 lI~ lltlllit l llti tlti ll~i tlillllllH H
= Go where you can buy reliable merchandise at minimum prices
Special Gym Outfit $2.00
Fresh Caps Lab. Coats Overall Suits
Gym Shoes Lab. A prons Class Toques
Gym Suits Shop Outfits. H ospital Coats
Towels Waiters Coats
Young Men's Suits and Overcoats
H irsh-Wickwire and other good makes
J. & M. SHOES
Wane &Co
3-35State St. Head of Liberty St.
r 1 1 1. i li 11 iil ii i 111 1 11 11 1 1 11 1 i Ii1 II ll 1

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