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November 15, 1995 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1995-11-15

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2-The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 15, 1995 , 1, rY
Balkans peace talks near close in Dayton

Christopher meets
with leaders to offer
U.S. proposals
Los Angeles Times
DAYTON, Ohio - With Bosnia
peace talks nearing the make-or-break
time, Secretary of State Warren Chris-
topher held a series of meetings with
the conflict's factional leaders yester-
day, offering U.S. proposals to resolve
the remaining disputes blocking a com-

prehensive settlement.
State Department spokesman Nicho-
las Burns said Christopher met three
times each with Croatian President
Franjo Tudjman, Bosnian President
Alija Izetbegovic and Serbian Presi-
dent Slobodan Milosevic during a mara-
thon day of talks preceding a scheduled
late-night departure for Japan.
"There is a different feel to this place
than there was on Nov. 1" when the
talks began, Burns said.
Although he refused to supply de-

tails, Burns implied that the Dayton
talks are nearing the end game. He said
the negotiations are expected to go on
"into the weekend" and probably into
next week. But he said the parties are
nearing the point where the talks will
either succeed or fail.
"We're going to stay here as long as
we think there is a chance for an agree-
ment," Burns said.
In Washington, President Clinton told
congressional leaders that the parties
negotiating in Dayton have made clear

that unless the United States provides
troops to help police an agreement "there
will be no peace in Bosnia."
In a nine-page letter responding to an
assertion by Senate Majority Leader
Bob Dole (R-Kan.) and House Speaker
Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) that the chances
of congressional approval of the use of
U.S. troops was "almost nil," Clinton
outlined the rationale for American
participation and launched a vigorous
defense of the administration's diplo-
matic and military plans.
Although he said it would cost about
$1.5 billion to keep 20,000 American
troops in Bosnia as part of a 60,000
troop NATO-led force, Clinton argued
"the costs and risks of failing to make
peace are far greater."

Ohio abortion ruling could affect Michigan
DAYTON, Ohio- A judge's decision to temporarily block a new Ohio law that
restricts late-term and "dilation and extraction" abortions could affect Michigan
and other states if the case is appealed, legal experts said yesterday.
U.S. District Court Judge Walter Rice on Monday delayed implementation of
the Ohio law, which was to have taken effect yesterday, for at least 10 days. Rice
said he needed time to decide whether to issue an order that would block the law
indefinitely and likely result in an appeal.
The target of the law is dilation and extraction, an abortion procedure in which
the brain of the fetus is suctioned out and the skull collapsed to remove the fetus
from the womb.
Abortion-rights advocates said the late-term procedure is used in less than.I
percent of the 1.5 million abortions performed each year, generally when the fetus
is severely deformed orthe mother's life is at risk. Opponents said a "living fetus"
is partially delivered, then killed.
The Women's Medical Professional Corp. and Dr. Martin Haskell, both of
Cincinnati, filed a lawsuit on Oct. 27 challenging the law. They said it would
violate their constitutional rights to privacy, liberty and due process.
Although the U.S. House passed a bill on Nov.l to outlaw the method, Janet
Folger, legislative director of Ohio Right to Life, said Ohio is the only state to ban
the procedure.

U 11.

SPRING TERM IN NEW HAMPSHIRE
writing, camping, reading, hiking, music, canoeing, art
vLTERA T&
NELP
Earn 8 credits as you study Thoreau, Emerson, Frost,
Hawthorne, in their native habitat.
INFORMATIONAL MEETING & SLIDE SHOW
Thursday Nov. 16 at 8 PM
x o Chemistry Building
For more info contact Jackie Livesay at 764-9505 or 761-3468

Wednesday

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11:30-3pm_
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1/3 lb. of lean ground chuck
Drink Special 9pm-Close
$1.00 off all English Pints of Beer

338 S. State
996-9191

Most U.S. women at
risk for breast cancer
WASHINGTON - Most U.S.
women have at least one of the four
breast cancer risks that account for 41
percent of the disease, scientists report.
Doctors have long known that cer-
tain characteristics like the age when a
woman gives birth are risks for breast
cancer, but differ over just how much
cancer they cause.
Patricia Madigan of the National In-
stitutes of Health studied 7,508 women
to come up with the latest estimate that
90 percent of women have at least one
of the risks cited in 41 percent of the
cases. The estimate was reported in
today's edition of the Journal of the
National Cancer Institute.
Breast cancer strikes 180,000 women
each year and kills 46,000. About one
in nine U.S. women are expected to
suffer breast cancer at some point of
their lives.
The risk factors cited exist in about
73,800 of the total cases, the study
indicated. Having no children or hav-
ing them afterage 19 together accounted
for 29.5 percent of those breast cancer

cases, a higher income, 18.9 percent;
and having a close relative who got the
disease, 9.1 percent. Some women had
more than one risk.
The percentage of higher-income
women reflected in part that they were
more likely to get checkups.
X-rys may settle
deathpenalty disput
NEW YORK - A murder defendant
claims he's too young to face the death
penalty. Federal prosecutors want to X-
ray his bones to see for themselves.
Fu Xin Chen - a reputed gang mem-
ber charged with conspiring to kidnap,
torture and murder a Chinese garment
worker - says he's only 15. Author-
ties believe Chen is 23.
Chen's age could mean his life.-
adults can be sentenced to death in
federal court for a kidnapping that ends
in a killing. Juveniles cannot.
Prosecutors argued during a closed
hearing last week that X-rays would
show whether Chen's bones are those
of an adult, according to defense attor
neys and a law-enforcement source.

oa new mom,
the most beautiful sight in the world
is the face of her baby.

i ? k"z'

o AROUND THE WORLD

I

11

MEANWHILE, ON THE WAY TO HER FIRST J08 INTERVIEW..
.r Z''

Bosnia peWe talks
dose to finishing
DAYTON, Ohio - With Bosnia
peace talks nearing the make-or-break
time, Secretary of State Warren Chris-
topher held a series of meetings with
the conflict's factional leaders yester-
day, offering U.S. proposals to resolve
the remaining disputes blocking a com-
prehensive settlement.
State Department spokesman Nicho-
las Bumns said Christopher met three
times each with Croatian President
Franjo Tudjman, Bosnian President
Alija Izetbegovic and Serbian Presi-
dent Slobodan Milosevic during amara-
thon day of talks preceding a scheduled
late-night departure for Japan.
"There is a different feel to this place
than there was on Nov. 1" when the
talks began, Burns said. "They have
come a long way."
Although he refused to supply de-
tails, Burns implied that the Dayton
talks are nearing the end game. He said
the negotiations are expected to go on
"into the weekend" and probably into
next week. But he said the parties are
nearing the point where the talks will
either succeed or fail.

"We're going to stay here as long as
we think there is a chance for an agree-
ment,"Burmssaid,
Peres reassures
settlers in conference
TSOFIN, West Bank - On a bull-
dozed hilltop astride the line between
Israel and the West Bank, Acting Prime
Minister Shimon Peres called his first
scheduled news conference yesterday
to tell a skeptical domestic audiene
that he is keeping close watch on secu-
rity as he presses ahead with Palestin-
ian self-rule.
It was a message ofreassurance ainec
at Jewish settlers in the West Bank ati
residents of Israeli border towns along.
side. Peres packaged it in a careflly
staged setting of senior generals, whirl.
-ing helicopter blades and a dranatic
view of the Israeli town of Kokhav Yai
in the valley below.
Peres, a former defense minister who
helped create Israel's nuclear-weapon:
program, is dogged nonetheless by ai
image of weakness that lost him -hi
party's leadership to Yitzhak Rabb
before the last election in 1992.
- From Daily wire service

As a new mom, you'll want to spend every moment
you can with the newest addition to your family. That's
why you'll want to see the newest addition to our family,
the Women's Hospital Birth Center.
WOMEN'S HOSPITAL BIRTH CENTER
GRAND OPENING
Saturday, December 2, 1995
10to 11 a.m.
Pre-conception Planning Seminar
11 a.m.
Birth Center Dedication Ceremony
Invited guests: Mrs. John Engler and triplets
11a .m. to 1 p.m.
Tours, food, entertainment & free gifts
Come see our family-centered approach to childbirth.
Where instead of being moved to different rooms for labor,
delivery and recovery, moms and babies can stay together
in the same room until it's time to leave. See how each
private birth room combines home comforts with the latest
medical technology. And talk with the doctors, nurses and
midwives who are committed to making the special
experience of childbirth more memorable.
For more information about the Grand Opening, or to reserve
your place at our free pre-conception planning seminar, please
call the Women's Health Resource Center at 313-936-8886.
For directions and free parking information, please call
U-M TeleCare at 763-9000 and enter category 2229.

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IT'$ ONE fTHIN TO CRAM FOR
CHEMMIDTE RM. DON' TRY I
WITH YOURJ05 EARCH.

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BUSNES TAF JL.'RS * '5.5,Bsies Mna

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