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May 13, 1923 - Image 2

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PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, MAY 13, 1923
W aexcessive frivolities, or perhaps she toss of a Leginska-type shock of hair, ing their inferiority.
W o mT en and s anoust plain lazy, but a nice girl and would hold their own as long as This musical activity of women will
and all that,-so she may be granted there was no competition with the produce no happier results than it
Nil ic a normal diploma. opposite sex. But as soon as Field hitherto has if institutes permit them-
3CThe few men that attend musicr Marshall dIndy had exchanged swords selves to be contented with the loaf-
schools can be divided into three with General Casella the women ing type of girl, which they undoubt-
classes: those that are talented work- would not stand a ghost of a chance, edly will for many unavertable rea-
Com m unication ers who intend to go on with their but would, o course, persist in deny- (Continued on Page Seven)
music after having exhausted the of-
Sir: ferings of the school; and then those
Let it be said at the very start that who, though they may be diligent, are
this article deals not with prime sadly lacking in gift. and so they make
donne, but rather with composers and the grave mistakes of intending to
mnusicians. Yes, it is sad but true- professionalize in music as a life or-
the idols of the song lover are not cupation. In the third class are those FIR ST
musicians, with but remarkably few who love music and study it as a side
exceptions, 'line in order that the joys or their N A IO A
Forthe last five hundred years it lives may be enhanced. But thi- thiA I
has been an accepted truth that wo- group need not be considered for the BA N K
men are the musical sex. Moreover, discussion deals only with those who
there seems to be no prospect of the become famous and with those who OUG AN rzrs 1863
sad realization of the fact that they never become anything, not with those
are not. Nearly every girl from the who are slightly known, even for their
middle class ip studies music. The love and appreciation of music.
musical institutes are monopolized by Now to deal with the enraged suf-
girls. Occasionally at recitals a male fragette--her cry is that women can'
may offer a voice selection, but very do things just as well as men.
rarely does a man play the piano or The World War was an advertisement
violin. Nevertheless, women as a on a vast scale of the female sex.
whole are undeserving of praise. They Women shamefully took advantage of
have never redowned to art in the the absence of the world's men. They
snoallest way of importance. The up- claimed superiority as theirs whent in
holders of the sex can readily pro- reality there was no competition OLDEST BANK IN ANN ARBOR
duce a list of women who have become should the composers of the modernDEST NATIONAL BANK IN MICHIGAN
famous, but it will he noticed that the French School declare war on thoseD
only reason they are famous is be- of the Italian School, France's aute-
cause they appear in that list. I beg sea would spring into prominence with
you, serious-minded women scholars a lavishing of the pen, with a wild
of art, not to take aiy of these state-
mentsa as an injury noi' to allow suci
truths as these to dispirit you in your
approach to the Hall of Fame: tut
please understand, if one generalizes_
among men ,it would be treachery to
specify among women.
^ But to continue with more pathetic
truths: the only reason that women ss g
are considered to have highly unagis-
ative minds, to be gifted artistically.
and to possess deft fingers for instru-
ment manipulation is because men
have hypnotized themselves into think-
ing so. That is. they have made wo-
men the ideal being, and have out
of sheer modesty overlooked their own
superior talents. Regarding inter-
pretation and musical feeling woien
are impossible. You have all heard
girl students' presentations of the
slow movement of ,a heethoven Son-\
ata: enough said concerning the soul
of a woman! Womens' attempts in
the field of musical criticism are
heinous. They persist in striving to
Sxpiress the idelogy of the composer.
They rush over miajens toss 'they
revel in the temperamient of theti-
ist; they bravely analyze hispsyclisl-
ogy; and his gentle spirit and soulful
pensonality never escap the judgment
of a female critic.
In our Southern states the general
conception of music is very low. Par-
ents send their daughters to conserva-=J
tories where they are to receive a 0
"musical education." But almost in-
variably the sole object of the fair in-
-mate of the school is to learn one or
two emotion-stirring pieces so that=
when the beau conies to call he may
be infatuated by the strains of aa-
dreamy waltz, ,a poor but sentimental
interpretation of Liszt's Liebestrausisus
or perhaps by an overwrought Chopin
Nocturne.
There is a strange but perfectly=
logical explanation of this serious
case of female superabundance in nu- -
sic institutes not only in the South
but also in the northern states. Most
girls graduate from college at about
the time when they can marry. But
usually they don't wed for several
years. Their great problem is: what
are they to do with themselves dur-
ing this interval? Many find it easily
solved. They register in a music HTIS frocks are charming, because they are simply designed--with the sort of
school that is situated in a location Csimplicity that is always distinctive---and nearly always inexpensive. Soft pat-
conveniently accessible to good times. terns and colors display their beauty, tying themselves to the mode by means of tqiuaint
Perhaps the exasperated teachers do sashes or collars or wearing huge, decorative chous. Silks of crepy surfaces or shaggy
sonsehow succeed in arousing an in- sports weaves and tubabses of every imaginable weave and description are being pre-
tomehowaisse thei irlintsan, - lily aented in favorite shades at prices you'll find pleasant.
terest, and if so, the girl probably

graduates with an artists diploma.
Perhaps her time was occupied Iwcith S E C FLOOR
u55-.ss sl artl les of olS Is io by boa
stIe s an 0- ' scrasssf" '"
"p ld/re t f ti' C'to-,-t e e a t- .

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