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June 30, 1921 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-30

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of Sports
with the lowly Cincinnati Reds. Un-
less the Pirates play better ball thanf
they did against New York theirj
chances to retain the lead will be
small.
In the American league the Yankees
are keeping up their steady pace and
are always threatening to overtake
he Indians, but never seem to have
quite the punch to step into first
place. The Cleveland pitchers have
rot been going up to their usual,
'orm, and unless Bagby regains his
old stride the Indians will have a hard
time keeping ahead of the New York-
ers when they meet them next week.
Middleweight Title in Dispute
Who is middleweight champion?
This is the question being asked
since the meeting of Champion John-

ny Wilson and Bryan Downey in
Cleveland. According to the Cleve-
land boxing commission, and sport
writers, the title belongs to Down-
ey, who acquired it by a knockout
over Wilson in the seventh round of
their 12-round tilt.
Referee Gardner, of Lowell, Mass.,
declared that Wilson retains the title
because he was fouled by Downey.
All of the leading sport men who
witnessed the bout say that there
was no foul committed, and that the
title rightfully belongs to Downey.
At any rate the present title holder
was badly beaten.
Meet Ends in Ties
Track athletes representirg Oxford
and Cambridge tied yesterday with the
combined Princeton-Cornell team.
The English combination won five
firsts and six seconds, to the Ameri-
can athletes' five firsts and five sec-
onds.
None of the records made in this
meet were as outstanding as the one
made. by Gourdin of Harvard in the
recent meet between the Englishmen
and the Harvard-Yale combination.
In general the results were only aver-
age.
Abrahams, of Cambridge, was the
individual1 star, winning the 100 yard
dash and the broad jump., The sen-
sation of the meet was the running
of Foresman of Princeton, who out-
classed Seagrove, the British star
distance man, in the three mile run.
Seagrove had been conceded a first
in this event but the little Princeton
runner kept pace with him until the
final lap and then drew away. lie
won in 15:18 3-5.

CRITTIQUE
rrr
"The Sworn Brothers"
A book which pleases me more than
a little is "The Sworn Brothers",
(Knopf) by Gunnar Gunnarsson,
translated from the Danish.
It is at once a romantic and hu-
man novel of the ancient Norsemen.
Up to the reading of this book every
Viking whom I have encountered in
print - has been a plaster of Paris
fellow stuffed with dead wadding; he
has been an unyielding person, al-
ways striking picturesque poses. I
was for believing that he had no
human prototype.
In "The Sworn Brothers" I began
to suspect that these ancient Norse-
men liked to eat, to make love, and
to touch a beer mug to the mouth
and eyebrows.
One Quite Modern
. Indeed, Leif, one of the sworn
brothers, is quite modern in spirit.
He has" a sardonic snicker for the,
gods and has less love for Thor than
a Frenchman has for Hindenburg.
When he goes Viking he momentarily
forgets the girl back home for a
pretty wench on the English coast.
Leif is inclined to quarrel easily, he
does not understand himself, he does
the most foolhardy things, escaping

harm in a miraculous manner.

yet there is no charmed-life nonsense
to disgust the reader. He finally falls
from a sword thrust by a serf.
Ingolf, the other brother, is more
reserved, more traditionally Nordic,
except that he somewhat favors
peaceful pursuits; but he is courage-
ous and a valiant fighter. He thor-
oughly venerates the gods of his an-
cestors.
The fathers of the two boys# are.
truly human. Their fighting days are
done, their limbs are weary, and
they point to the times gone by as
the times when the best of the breed
lived. They are, in short, in their
dotage; they relate adventures Hy-
perborean, they bury their noses in
cups of red wine and beer. Thus we
see that between the Norsemen's
fighting days and Valhalla there is
senility, a thing almost unheard of
in Viking tales.A
Women More Conventional
The wives of the two brothers,
however, are thoroughly convention-
al figures and they are less human.
There is no question of their faith,
honor, and virtue, and they are, in
the main, uninteresting.
There is finally a feud in which the
two 'brothers are victorious over their
enemies, but they are forced to leave
for Iceland, where Leif dies and the
story ends.
All in all, "The Sworn Brothers"

And

is a good book; it is realistic
romantic, it is interesting an
structive. Of all the stories w
have read of ancient Scandina
is the best.
Communicatio,
Editor, the Wolverine:
The Wolverine has asked op
on the prices of drinks and. c
tions as asked on State stret
cerning this as all other thin
have no opinion. That is gen
recognized. Whenever I have
forth the mild verdict that so:
is an obvious poltroon and
everyone has seemed to think
have been unjust and harsh. 2
ice cream, I do not know what
it costs the price of three blue
and I cannot afford to exper
In Detroit, it only costs the pr
two blue books. Blue books
worth more there. As for car
have no gal, so she can't te
whether it is cheap or, not.
FALSTA
To Deternlne Valuation Bf
Washington, July 29.-The
finance committee will det(
early next week its policy on th
erican valuation basis for ass
tariff duties.

-----------------

lunch

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every day

All candy 20 percent off
0 0 East Liberty Street

T I I E-,'TT E Q
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SHOWS AT

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BURTON SPENDING
SUMMER IN NORTH
President Marion L. Burton is
spending his vacation at Cass lake,
in the northern. part of Minnesota.
President and Mrs. Burton left Ann
Arbor June 30 for the lake, there to
remain until early in September.
Cass lake is one of the tributaries
of the Mississippi river an is one of
several such lakes in the forests of
northern Minnesota.

LAST TIME TODAY

WARREN KERRIGAN
In
"eTHE HOUSE OF WHISPERS"
SU NDAY - TUESDA'Y

LAST T I ME T O
PRISCILLA DI
In
"OUTSIDE THE L
SUNDAY - TUES

MAHLON HAMILTON
In
"HRALF A .CHANCE"

CHARLES RAY
In
Old Sw immin'

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T HE Tercentenary of the Landing of th#
Pilgrims is to be celebrated this year.
jThis well-known sterling silver service is named
for this first lady of the land,MARY CHILTON,
the first woman to Land at Plymouth from the
Mayflower.
yOUR diing table will be set with solid silver.
You will live with this silver many years and
your children will prize it as precious heirlooms.
IBefore making .your choice ask your jeweler to
show you the MARY CHILTON pattern.
TOW LE .M.ANUO F ACT U R IN G CO
('ooniat Silversmiths
NEW BU RY PORT, M ASS.

1I

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pin. Finder)
or phone 202.
12-3

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