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June 30, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-30

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fE WOLVERINE

f

MHE SUMME3R
[ICHIGAN.
Afternoons.
ard Street.
414.

sities ? In addition, it is easy to see that, under such
a comprehensive scheme, the head coaches would be
given a better chance to look among the men for
likely material, and their problems of getting try-
outs would, in a large measure, be solved.
Let us keep up the old college spirit by means of
the Varsity team, but let us also give a thought to
the physical education of the individual student.

0

' A
T WO

HAM
is0 6LLm G
0 . A IH

A M otim Ehnds

except Saturday.

Others' Opinons

d, the
an ev
The
Sthe o

ures
of

consideration. INo
encloses postage.
the sentiments ex-

rORIAL STAFF
hone 2414 or 783
. Managing Editor
UE EDITORS
John PF. Dawson, Jr.
... Harry B. Grundy
.Gwyneth Wrentmore
.........Clement Smith

James B. Young
Eleanor Miller
TAFF -
or B74
. . . . ..Bu sin ess M a n ag e r
.Assistant Business Manager

Don Allen
Walter Fiske
Joseph Vlack

OVERTON
OTLIGHT
t Thursday night
Ihe attendance, in
ht be well to look
rely must be a rea-

he
ere,
>ot-
the

every

,

a

3e,
re
d
or

GOOD BOOKS AND IGH PRICES
(The New York Times),
There has been much lamentation, natural and too
often justified, about the effect on the publishing
business, and more specifically upon literature and
science, of the high prices, begotten of the war, of
paper, binding, printing, all the materials, processes
and labor of book production. It has been feared,
and' was to some extent inevitable, that publishers
would too much confine themselves to books of
considerable or sure instant public appeal, and that
books containing the long results of research and
intended only for scholars and specialists would ap-
pear in diminishing and scanty numbers.
It may be doubted if this danger hasn't been ipag-
nified. Books of solid merit and value come from
the presses every week. Biography, history, politi-
'cal economy, social science, philosophy, pschology,
metaphysics-no Summer reading except for austere
and Spartan souls--biology and other sciences are
"well rpresented." Poetry, or at least verse,
marches along in columns, divisions, corps, and mul-
titudinous feet. In a universe full of fictions mch
else than novels is published. Still, Mr. "Balfour
in some remarks on "Post War-Reading," seems to
have taken the gloomy view; and he is qtioted as
saying that Mr. Gosse had been told by the Master
of Trinity College, Cambridge, that the Pitt Press
of that university, known and admired by students
and men of science in all pats of the world for its
scientific publications, "would be obliged to stop pro-
ducing altogether."
Fortunately, this is not the case. The Chairman
of the Syndics of the Cambridge University Press
says that "it" has never entered into the minds of
those who are responsible for the administration of
the Press that it would have to cease its activities."
In the United States as in Great Britain there are
endowed university presses whence works of perm-
anent value but restricted circulation are issued.
Ii particular those on science, which Mr. Balfour
has rightly called "the greatest instrument of social
change," are of inestimable value.. It is good to
know that there will be'no diminution of such works
from such sources; and, in spite of many dismal
vaticinations, the mere lay reader can't help noticing
a steady flow of meritorious works from private
publishing houses, in addition to the novels, that
everybody reads, and the slave or free verse that
everybody writes.f
On looking over the latest issue of The Wolver-
ine, .we find that we unconsciously have been con-
ducting a campaign for a spelling reform. Webster
and the cashier, at least, seem to disagree with us on
the orthography of th'e word consensus.
In a few more years, may we expect the sport
page to occupy the front section of all our metro-
politan papers?
Smithereens
The Burning Question
Are State street merchants and the Union charg-
ing too much for their fountain services? It has
always been a primary principle of this Pilaster of
Pellucidity to ride the crest of public opinion, and
while you may 'say that our good ship has been at
times in need of Calkins-well anyhow what we
started to say 'was that we have done a little re-
search on this subject, with astounding results. A
number of persons were asked their opinions on the
s ~ject-from the President down-and the follow-
in replies .were obtained.
President Burton (by wire from Cass' Lake)-
"I advocate turning the situation to the advantage
of the Campus, by means of diverting public opin-
ion into such channels, Why not have all the foun-
taineers start selling a feature known as the 'keep
off the grass' sundae, at reduced prices. Suggest a
lump of ice cream on a head of lettuce. Am heartily
interested in such a vital topic."
Intelligent looking janitor in Tappan Hall-"I'm
payin' more for my Sundays than I ever did before,
I know that. Time was when the.family could go
to church and get out of it for a nickel apiece. but
now my wife makes me take her out in the car ridin'

. with the neighbors, every Sundlay afternoon, and
sometimes I'm mebbe a dollar lighter when we come
home, to say nothin' of gasoline. Oh yes, Sundays
on State street or anywhere else are a sight more ex-
pensive than they should be."
President Harding-"Normalcy is at hand for
the nut sundae !"
Dgctor Tomas Lovell, D. U. R., A. W. O. L.-
"Of the nut sundae and sodas for to say
. All the boys coming through out on State street way.,
In this same doing to say
They have in the paying to pay !"
R. Emerson Swart, President of the Union-"I
don't know anything about it. I never bought one
at the Union."
Editor of Smithereens-"Wish I could have a lit-
tle more direct means of research."

Have You
Tried Our

H. G. Prettytpan

PHONE 165

W, B.

I'

HOME COOKING
TEET'S
805 East Huron Street

Take a
KODAK

Dacily Program
August 1
5 p. m.-The Senses and the Learn-
ing Process in Fishes (illustrated),
Prof. J. E. Reighard.
8 p. m.--Recital. The Class in
Shakespearean Reading (Sarah Cas-
wel Angell hal).
August 2
5 p. m.-Greek Magic (illustrated),
Prof. Campbell Bonner.
8Hp. m.'Stone in the Kidney, Dean
Hugh Cabot.
August 3
5 p. m.-Dante, Assistant Prof. W.
A. McLaughlin.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the
University School of Music (Hill
auditorium).
August 4
5 p. m.-The Search for Skill Among
Two Million Men (illustrated), Prof.
L. L. Thurstone, of the Carnegie In-
stitute of Technology,
8 p. m.-Educationai Motion Pic-
tures.

Ii

HIGH CLASS FOOD
Servod at CHUBB'S
on State St. opposite Lane Hall

j with Y
Photography the Kodak way is less exr
than you think-and any Kodak is sin
work-we can readily show you how eas
Autpgraphic Kodaks from $8.oo up
lrolvnies $z.oQ Up

WHITE SWAN LA
FOR QUALITY AND SE

I

A

- W S -; ,

I

ASYABLS~tFJD1905

buys a brand
new Coroa
writer. otbeaes
at attraetive prices.
See us before you buy.,

WE BELIEVE .you will find here your ide
bank. And a hank that every year
likebetter

I

I

TYPEWRITERS
of leading makes bought, sold,
rented, exchanged, cleaned and
repaired.
O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade
For Horge-Cooked Meals

The Ideal Hot Weather
ICE" R

Our methods and machinery are up-to-date in every detail. Ti
with less wear to the fiabric. We cater especially to the student
on request. TRY US,

Member of the Federal Rese

Farmers & Mech
101-105 S0. MAIN STREET

y also need
t audiences.
e Spotlight
ear through
en a change
popularity
es and cam-

G
Jfr

TRY TUTTLES

Preferred By Students and
Towns-people

On Maynard Street, 1-2 plogk South
of Majesto Theatre

f

p

re, Mr.
state-
o be a

-%o,--,%. w w kow

.......,.w ,

I

ollege life. Argu-
competition does
ves them the so-
e them so much
he students spend
r squad that they
themselves.
vith some of Mr.
vholly accept his
letics are entirely.
most potent fyac-
ary if impalpable
ing of rivalry and
eniably a good

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and ,Surplus, $62,000.00
Resources .........$5,000,000.00
707 North University Ave.
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron

*1
5-a

!,

NO

s s

┬░eping the
ege seems
new field
t our col-
zed ? Let
es origin-

FAILINGS'
DINING ROOMS
$7.00 per Week-3 Meals
$6.00- per Week-2 Meals
HOME COOKING
Electric Fans
Cool, Ventilated Rooms
714 M ONROE STREET
East of Cutting's Flats

F-W Daily Service
Big Steamer
PutIn-Bay
Capacity 3270 Passengers
Finest exclusive Excursion Steamer. Largest Ball
Room, Finzel's Orchestra. No extra charge for dano-0
ing. Steamers leave on Eastern Time.
Every day from Detroit at 9:00 a. m for
Put-n-Bay - Connecting with Cleveland and
Buffalo Transit Co., and Steamer Arrow for
Middle BassKelley's Island&Gr Lakeside.
Sandusky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lines, Fare, $1.50
C.dar Point-ismin. byferryfromSandusky,Fareincludingferry, 1.75
Excurson fares,.(returningsame day
Pt-In-Bay, week day, 90c; Sundays, Holidays, $1.25 Round trip.
Sandusky.eveyday 2.00 Round trip.
Four hours at Put-In-Bay; Bathing, visit the Caves, Perry's Monumn
Pavilion, Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several H tels.
Cedar Point-Fresh water rival to Atlantic City;:Large Hotels, Board Wal
Thousands bathe here daily.
Returning: Leave Cedar Point by Ferry for Sandusky. Leave Sandusi
from Big Four Dock 2:30) pm. Put-in-Bay4:30 p. m. An. in Detroit 8:00p,.
Dancing Moonlights. Leave Ashley & Dustin~ Stemer Lin
Dwo"8.45.s F..are Wed. .. D
&I Thur. 60c Sat, &tSun. 7c Foot of First St. Detroit. Mial
Write for map foldr~~J

out for ath-
all and they.
things have
laces on the

Summer School
S tuden ts.
for
Fountain Refreshments
and Fine Candies
visit
Theffetsylzoss Shop
The Fountain Room, Beautiful

need

n in
for

1

Ml

didn't 3

13-15

'sAircade

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