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June 30, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DA for north as Port Arthur. From there
they will return by boat down the
Pacific coast to Portland, Ore., where
r Dean Effinger will visit his brother.
ith They will return to Ann Arobr through
h's the Rockies via the Canadian Pacific
st. railroad.
ng Subscribe to the Wolverine. $.75
for the rest of the Summer.--Adv.
VATERMAN, CONKLIN'
SWAN
d Ev'EsHA RP
FYN.E POINT
M CLOCKS
r & Fuller
SreetJewlers.

Union Ice Plant
Defies Unseemnly
Rise of iurcury

i

FRIES TRACES GROWTH OF f
MODERN ENGLISH GRAMMAR
(.(Continued from Page One)
Professor Fries pointed out that this

COACH YOST HAS PLANS
FOR COACHING SCHOOL

window display of

AluWe
minot be beat. Make your choice

nplete.
sizes.

Don't let your lawns dry

Ice Cream'Freezers
e Camping Goods
Vacum Cup Tires and
Tubes
in shape before that trip
T. A lftl YVT % - A.

1/

Far below the surface, in the sec-
ond basement, stands the air and re-,
frigerating flant of the Michigan
Union, 4 factor of the building which
rises to a position of major impor-
tance in summer weather, when the
mercury rises to unseemly heights in
the thermometer. ;Should this go
wrong for just one day, enormous
quantities of food would go to waste.
A'trip through the plant has a de-r
cidedly chilling effect on, the ardor
of the curious investigator, but it is,
interesting for the light which it
throws on the varied and. complicat-
ed activities of the Unon building
Mystery of the Tower
How many students have wondered
about the little tower which rises
abive the ground ons.theu'south lawn
of the buildings - 'so quiet and ;un-'
obtrusive before the eye of the unde-
sired intruder? Perhaps it, was a lit-
tle gi otto to which the privileged
could retire with their chosen com-
panions to regale themselves with
pop _and pretzels, or, perchance, the
slaughter house in which the succu-
lent hamburger is killed.
But neither, of these fanciful sup-
positions has any basis, for this tower
is, as a matter of fact, the source of
air for the whole ventilating system
of the. Union. The air is drawn
through a wide tunnel by huge fans
situated within. These fans-are six
in number, and upply air to the
rooms above. Additional draught is
caused by four further fans placed
at the top of the building, which suck
off all the foul air. In the summer
this is used as a means for venti-
lating the building, while in the win-
ter, two series of steam radiators
placed in the fan -boxes peat the air,
respectively, to .40 ard 90 degrees,
the temperature being regulated by a
thermostat.
Also Carbon Dioxide
The refrigeration plant is also to
be found in this subbasement. The
cooling element is liquid carbon di-
oxide, under pressure, which 'when
allowed to expand, gives out intense
cold. It is compressed by means of
a large pump, whence it is passed to
condensers to be -cooled off. The com-
pression of the gas causes a consid
erable rise in temperature. The li.
quid is then allowed to escape as a
gas, with the resultant cooling of a
brine solution. This brine is circu-
lated around to the various refrigera-
.tors. It is so intensely cold that
heavy cakes of ice form on the pipes.
As these cakes of ice serve to in-
sulate the pipes, thus reducing the
cooling efficiency, two systems of
pipes are to be found in each of the
refrigerators, and these give ser'vice
alternately.'
The ice-making capacity of the
plant is 30 tons for each 24 hours. But
3 tons of ice are made, each day, as the
Union has no use for more; the re-
maining low temperature being" util-
ized in the refrigerators.
NEED AWAKENING IN EDU-
CATION TT MEET CONDITIONS
(Continued from Page One)
brought to bear on what a teacher
should do, both by law and by prece-
dent, makes for the setting apart of
the teachng class. A. teacher has to
remain a human being to teach well,
and in order to do 'so, she must take
part in religious, civic, political, and
social life of the community. The
first aim of the teacher should be for
the development of a rich an" vital
personality.
"It is true that the salaries of
teachers are 6'o low that they are un-
able to counteract many of these ten-

dencies. In order' to realize the im-
provement and development which the
demands for better education find nec-
essary, the whole standard of the
teaching profession should be raised."
Subscribe to the. Wolverine. $.75
for the rest of the Summer.-Adv.

DELIVERY

development was but another mani- !
festation of the spirit of classicism
which typified that age.
In the usage of formal English to-
day, Professor Fries explained that{
though we have repudiated this idea
of classicism in our literature; it still
dominates. in the matter of grammati-
cal usage. He gave a few concrete
examples of phrases which have to-f
day become proper through histo ical
usage, due to various changes in word
forms .and the dropping of certain ob-
solete ones. Many of the expressions
which the so-called "purists" today
consider correct can be shown to be
grammatically unsound by going
back to the original usage of the
wotd.-
Professor Fries concluded with a;
few remarks in regard to the teach-
ing of grammar in the schools today.-
He said that too many rules without
application are taught before the pu-t
pil is old enough to understand what
they mean, and that, until he arrives
at a more mature age, fewer rules
well learned are of more use to him.'

* Subscribers of The Wolverine
who arenotareceiving their pa-
per regularly on Tuesday,
'Thursday, and Saturday after-
noons, or who have complaint
against the delivery, are re-
quested to call the business .of-,.
fice, telephone 960.

(Continued from Page One)
the students who need more physical
training, and this will be accomplish-
ed by the stimulation of more inter-
class sports, which will allow the stu-
dent body to enter more actively into
athletics. At the same time the new
course in physical training for menI
will offer a wider scope for students
who wish to fit themselves to be ath-
letic directors orcoaches and will
make an appeal to athletes in gen-
eral, while the Summer school of
coaching will allow the Michigan sys-
tems to be spread more widely over
the country.
BREACH IN ENTENTE LOOMS
OVER SILESIAN CONTROVERSY
(Continued from Page One)
on matters of common concern to theI
Allies.
The note likewise expresses surprise'
at the unusual and apparently un-
friendly tone of the French commun-
ique of Wednesday last which Great
Britain, the notetates, is loathe to be-
lieve was meant to convey an un-
friendly intentioni on the part, of the
French government.

sill
i
1

at $10.00 This Week

~'All
~ cc
'$ORR I NOV'A Bit-
D on't let your plumin
problems worry you.
Tell us about them and we'
be on the job immediately.
Whether your heating ai
rangements need overhau
ing or there's some plumin
that needs installing we'r
the proper parties to appel
to. Phone us.
V. M. Hochrein
Plumbing and Heating
Phone 525 211 So. 5th Ave.

J.'Karl M'alcolm
604 Ea9I Liberty Street

.

. .:._.. ..y

4I

SECOND

-HAND

BOOKS

FOR ALL DE PARTME N TS

SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS

will find

the Right Prices at

PALM BEACH SUITS

WA.

H.

R

U N VUNIVERSITY
'20. BOOK S'T'ORES

of

URCII SERVICES'
FIRST METHODIST
CHURCH
Cor. State and Washington Sts.
Rev. Arthur W. Stalker, Pastor
Miss Ellen W. Moore, Student
Director
10:30 A. M.-"Who Is My Neigh-
bor?" Rev. Dugald. MacFad-
yen.
11:45 A. M.-Bible School. Stu-
dent's, class in Auditorium of
Lane Hall.
6:00 P. M.-Social Half Hour.
6:30 P. M.-Young'People's De-.
votional Meeting. Miss Mar-
garet Scales, Leader.
All Students especially Invited
- N
UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Sts.
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister
SUNDAY SERVICE 10:30 A. M.
July 31
"THE HIGHEST ORITICISM"
We have all heard of the
"higher criticism.' This Sun-
day will be given to an interpre-
tation of Jesus and Christianity
by the ,greatest.of modern his-
torical students in that field-
Adolph Harnack. After this
Sunday the mpinister goes on his
vacation.
You are cordially welcomed in
this church.

PATRONIZE WOLVERINE
ADVERTISERS
They Deserve and Appreciate
Your Trade

We Deserve and Appreciate \
Your Co-operation

0

IT MEANS A BIGGER AND
BETTER WOLVERINE

l
. ,
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t y
r r
.: .

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I..

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VICTROLAS
$25.00 and Upward

1

e a

STEWART 'PHONOGRAPHS,
'$ 15.000

I

1

1

RECORDS
For Summer Cottaiges

IU

CHURCH

fi

OPEN AIR

CAM P U

S

Comin

SERVICE

11

t 7:30 P. M.

I,

611-6t0Est £witamr itnrnw

(

Speaker, Rev. S. S. Rolbins.
Subject, "Puritans and P-
grims."

Church

IL

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