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July 03, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

w de- 1 going work in our schools and col-
tional leges

, it is not only
tinized, but criti-
le severity. There
I that our educa-
i equip our boys
cifically for the
eness and indefi-
uication have been
r criticism. The
unquestioned cer-
has produced a

system cannot be escaped.
"From the standpoint of American
life as a whole," said Doctor Burton,
"the problem involved here is funda-
mental. Superficiality is an American
vice. Historically speaking, we have
been a race of pioneers. We have done
the best we could, but it takes time to
develop a substantial civilization.
Temperamentally, we are not well
equipped for patient, thorough-going
work. Our,aim has been to turn off a
task quickly. The war has produced
a serious restlessness among our peo-
ple and our youth, and if it had been
difficult before, it will be almost Im-
possible to settle down to thorough-

Speaks of Rhodes Scholars
Speaking of American Rhodes schol-
ars, President Burton said that the
members of the faculty of Oxford uni-
versity had stated in their reports that
the Rhodes scholars do not settle down
to real thorough work, and that they
seem to have been taught nothing pre-
cisely. Moreover, they were reported
to have lacked accuracy and hard
drive. 'Here is an excellent example
of the statement that the 'American
educational system represents and re-
flects American civilization," declared
Doctor Burton.
3n speaking of .the effects of the war
on American scholars, President Bur-

ton said: "New facts are at .hand
which offer more hope for satisfactory
results. The war has given multi-
tudes of Americans a new sense of
thoroughness. Even before the war
there was a growing intellectual earn-
estness and seriousness.
Will Seize Opportunities
"Surely, the schools of today must
seize the present opportunities to ren-
der unlimited service to the country,
for America needs'a generation of citi-
zens trained to do thoroughly and ac-
curately whatever it undertakes. Here
is where the emphasis must lie. It is
the old-fashioned, insistent, unescap-
able demand lying back of all worthy
effort in any field. It means exact,

precise, conformity to facts. It re-
quires the elimination of mistakes,
errors, and defects.
Delicacy Demanded
"It calls for delicacy, nicety, and
precision of thought and action. It'
demands the rigor of the mathematical
and scientific spirit. The public school
system of America can render no
greater service to our democracy than
to equij a group of citizens, who in-
stinctively and habitually work and
think with accuracy and precision.
Here is the old demand expressed in
the terms of a new day.,"
President Burton stated that another
great duty of the present day public
schools is to place a higher value upon
the art of teaching, in order to awakenk
the students to a sense of the .best
things in life. "Any.careful student
of American education recognizes that
a new tendency is at work in our
entire educational system," he said.
"It arouses the concern if not the
opposition of those who idealize tech-
nical skill, of those who are ardentE
advocates of research, and of those
who, considering their good taste, look
with disdain upon 'inspiration.'"
Generation Faces Task
"This generation faces a splendid
task, and its unlimited potentialities

ers who teash. That is to sa:
who recognize that a human 1
one of the final values of Ii
therefore, actually proceed ul
hypothesis that the thing which
is not the quantity of mater!
sented, but the actual, positivE
ening of a human.spirit."
The modernizing of the stuc
one of the fundamental labors
public schools, according to E
ton. He brought out the fact I
war has left tremendous burdE
released marvelous new fore
that no ,intelligent citizen tod
assume his duties without some
edge of our main problems,.
"For example," he said, "th
tions involved in our new inter]
(Continued on Page 6)

E ODORLESS CLEANING
how much longer our Energine Cleaning
over any other cleaning you have had.

/

U
z
U

Garment
Company
REPAIRING

b/
-I
H

WANTED
WANTED---We want several Summer
School students to help in kitchen
and dining room for board. The
"Y" Inn, Lane Hall.
WANTED-To rent a canoe for months
of July and August. Qall 372-J, be-
tween 6 and 7.
WANTED-Waiter and dishwasher to
work for board during Summer Ses-
sion. Prone 1775.
WANTED-Several ladies or men to
do some figuring for a fe* days; 30
cents per hour. Apply at office, rear
of second oorfi. Mack & Co.
WANTED-To rent canoe for - re-
mainder of season. Phone 884-J.

FOR SALE
FOR SALT-Hup Speedster at bargain
if taken right away. Ricter Garage;
1219 S. University.

I

FOR RENT

SA-NDIERS' CANOE I
On the .HuronIt Jiv,

FOR RENT
FOR RENT - Garage for summer
Months. Located 624 Church street,
near S. University ave. Five dollars
per month. Phone 1523.
FOR RENT-Rooms for students; 2%
blocks east of campus; good quiet
house. 1349 Wilmot. Phone 2384-J.
FOR RENT-Office in the Cutting
apartments, formerly occupied by
Dr. E. F, Loeffler. Apply Janitor.
Phone 1159-M.

,_.. _

M A"D TIC

Last Times Today

-ANN ARBOR-PHONE 2508

MAURICE.
T 0 URNEU
PRODUCTIQN

(

You

Save

Money

Irn

By Purchasing Your
Be ac h

u

66 -0 1
vi

A BIG STRONG TALE OF THE SEA AND OF FAR FLUNG
OF ADVENTURE. DO NOT BE MISLEAD BY THE TITLE
PHOTOPLAY HAS NO RELATION TO ANY WAR.
OTHER FEATURES

HERE

./ r

) PALM BEACH SUITS REDUCED TO
) PALM BEACH SUITS REDUCED TO
) PALM BEACH SUITS REDUCEDTO
) COOL CLOTH SUITS REDUCED TO

-- $21.75
- - $22.75
- - $24.50
- - . $27.50

ALL SEATS - 25c

I K

I

*0

Co Me to the Biggest Sale in the City at

Daily Service

1

Lutz

Clothing Store;

217 S. Main

Opp Mack & Co.

i , . i

Big Steamer
Put-In0-Bay
Capatity 3270 Passengers
Finest exclusive Excursion Steamer, Largest
Ball Room, Finzel's Orchestra. No extra 0
charge for dancing.
Every day' from Detroit at 40 a. m. for
Put-ln-Bat - Connecting with Cleveland and
Buffalo Transit Co., and Steamer Arrow for
Middle Bass, Kelley's Island & Lakeside.
Sandusky--Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lines, Fare, $1.50
Cedar Point-15min. by ferry fromSandusky, Fareincludingferry, 1.75
Excursion fares, (returning same day
Pu-I-Bay, week day 90c; Sundays, Holidays, $1.25 Round trip.
Sandusky. evey day. $2.00 Round trip.
Four' hours at Pt-In-Bay; Bahing, visit the Caves, Per~ry's Monumnent,
Pavilion, Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several Hotels.
Cedar Point-Fresh water rival to Atlantic City; Large Hotels, Board Walk,
Thousands bathe here daily.
Returning Leave Sandusky 2.30 p m.,Pt-in-Bay 4.30 p. m.i, Leave Cedar
Point ferry; connect at Sandusky, every day arrive Detroit 8.00 p. mn.
Dancingt Moonlights. Leave Ashley & Dustin Steamer Line
D etroit8.45p.rTFareWed. iI

DET RIT REAMERY

a
Y.

& Thur. 6oc Sat, &Sun. ?5c.
Write for snap folder

rot of F ilst 5t

Detroit, M511ic..

;, I ,

1 , ./
.. '/
1
,
_ .

Such a difference in Sodas and Sundaes-and

VELVET BRAND ICE CREAM IS ONE REASON.
The Detroit Creamery has established a permanent Branch

-' '
"'--__._

in Ann Arbor to supply the demand.

_,;
.
.

R

at

$1.00

Subscribe Now!

Phone
960

TIhe

Wolerin e

$1.00
Phone
960

The Only

Campus

e or at

Delivered to your Door Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday

for Su

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