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July 03, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-03

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THE WOLVERINE

- ..,

_ _--

JTSIDE
'ED BY SEXTO

N

I

PRF. CROSS DESCRIBES
BEUTIES OF TUMBIA

THE

s of
-eat-

blic scnooisj
n, superin-
Lansing, in
Educational
Science au-

erly supervised and report made to the
school authorities.
Course Successful
The course has been very successful
in bringing about the completion of
high school education by many boys
who were not interested in college pre-
paratory work,. he said. On the, whole1
the grade of intelligence of those en-,
rolleld in the industrial department has
been high. The Lansing schools were
the first in Michigan to introduce such
a program.
Wider scope of vocational, guidance
with less formality in manual training
and domestic science classes was rec-
ommended. "In former d9ys boys found
their natural bent on the farm or in
the shop of the small town. The city
boy lacks this opportunity, and he
should consequently be given the ad-
vantage of trained assistance in select-
ing his vocation," said Sexton.
Interest of the'boy musk be aroused
in the vocational work, and greater
I freedom given to his own personal ip-
clinations. The same principle applied
to domestic science and other courses
for girls, he said. Efficiency of the
department will be greatly increased.
by frequent consultations with parents

ARCHITECTURAL TGEMS,
: ITt BEST IN
WORLD

RANK

wv

In his travelogue on "Tunisia"
given last night in the Natural Science
auditorium, Prof. Herbert R. Cross, of
the Fine Arts department, described
and told of the wonderful natural
beauty of that country, its architec-
tural gems, which rank with the best
in the world, the ancient glory and
power of its many cities, and the haa-
jestic spirit and charm of the Orient
that dominates the whole country.
Tunisia is the eastern of the Barbary
states on. the northern coast of Africa.
It has an area proportional to that of
the state of New York, being about
150,000 square miles. At present it is
under the protectorate of the French
government and the latter points with
pride to the prosperity which has been
in prominence since the start of their
sovereignty, said Professor Cross.
Tunis Largest City
Tunis, the largest and most import-
ant city in the state, is situated on a
banal which has been dredged out by
the French engineers and which
reached to the Mediterranean sea. The
new part of the city would, if it were
not for the palms, make one believe he
were in Paris, for in the governmental E
building the French have introduced
their own architecture. This, accord-
ing to Professor Cross, was a great

0

L

V

E

.I

R

"#

I

of
cli

;

bs

poses Ag Classes j
i agriculture and garden'
roposed as the most prac-
of educating the boys back
especially in the .smaller
arming communities. "In
garden club can profitably

$1.0

i

sum of $30,000'
2,500 members

the Lansing schools," the
erintendent declared.
est recreational agency in
States today, the moving
said by l[r. Sexton to be
.class unsuitable for pres-
fore audiences of school
o meet this problem, films
ational value wefie secured
ed each Saturday morning
inter in two of the largest
Lansing. A capacity .audi--
rested children witnessed
in. Films were reviewed
tee of Lansing citizens be-
re permitted to be shown.
R STORE
-EMENT
ard Sts.

esser in the City I
814 S. STATE

MEALS

y $6 50 per wk.

mistake, and he, says that the French
are recognizing this fact now and are
using he old Tunisian type of
building.
Walls Suirond Old Part
The old part of the' town 4is sur-
rounded by the ancient walls and bat-
tlements and there are many magnifi-
cent arches which open into It.' When
one enters into the old city of Tunis
through these arches, according to
Professor' Cross, he . steps into the
Orient with all. its mysticism, enchant-
ment, *brilliance, and spirit of an-
ientism. .
The houses are of the characteristic
Moorishk type with their low flat roofs
and plain light exteriors.' The streets
are: narrow and the stores are o the
typical Oriental bazaar type, being
small 'shops along the sides of the
streets, Professor Cross explained.
Population Mixed
The population of Tunis is made up
of the Arabian, with his simple noble
features, suggesti-ve of a European;
the Barber from the mountains of
Africa; the Jew, and the Sudanese
negro. The religion of the country is
~sse inthe ityi Ithat of Mohammed and the mayj
mnosques or Mohammedan places of
worship, together with their shaft-like
minerets standing against the sky, a e
beautiful examples of the Morish ar-
chitecture. These people are faithful
in their worship, land the appeals of
the criers from the minerets are quick-
ly answered. by the people with the
offering of prayer, during which they
face Mecca.
Carthage Tntirestng
Carthage, on the Mediterranean sea
coast, is perhaps one of the most ian
teresting cities in the state from, the
point of tle. historiai, he said, for it
was here that there once existed a
state that almost overthrew the great
Roman empire. Today, it lies in ruins,
and as its people were not worshipers
of art such as those of Greece and
Rome, its ruins do not have any value
from an artistic point of viww.
At the El Diem is the fifth largest
amphitheatre in the world, the result
of Roman efforts. .It is one of the nost
beautiful building gems that has ever
been produced, Professor Cross de-
dlared.
Outside of Tunis is the famous
Bardo museum, where the works of
thT Greek, Roman and Arabian ar-
tisans have been gathered into one
place. There are here some of the most
beautiful and graceful works that have
ever been produced, he concluded.
aB
FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
O61 the Huron River
READY TO SERVE
From ll a.m. to p.m. and
510o7 p. x's.
Pot of Hot Tea and Bowl of Rice
PLAIN CHOP SKY 35C
CHWE and AMER. STYLE.
QVANG TVNO LO
613 East Liberty

School

*

t

N~w S

O F

T H E

"THE BEST PART OF
SvM MER SCHOOL"

CAMPUS

t

.

CITY
WORLD

Published every Tuesday, Thursda
and Saturdays during Summer

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