100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 03, 1920 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

of our country today and that the
falsity of the German educational sys-
tem has provoked the most careful
scrutiny of all our educational
agencies.
"The unescapable lesson of the war
rg in is that Germany lacked integrity," said
labor, Doctor Burton, "and she manifested it
g out (lby her duplicity and her repeated ef-
s, all forts to eliminate ethical consideras-
ained tions fron international relationships.
imply As the world trusts America today, so
America must be able to trust her
educational system.
duty' "We must stand, therefore, for abso-
here lute, unqualified devotion to the truth.
ourse Honest work must be done in every
Back class room. Intellectual integrity must
st be be or first assumption. A general
4e of standard must prevail which requires
the plain honesty and sheer aintegrity in
ild be all of the relationships of the school-
ogent house.
j onest Citizens Needed

Marvelous
Greece,

1 1 L. W V I-.V L 1\ 1A1V A ' A .I
Past Handicaps frodern
Says Her Representatives

ave its forum
f the day arej
nbers of thej
ould mingle
blems on a'
he daily con-!
)uld reflect aj
ern for pub-'
anticipate in
hey must per-,

"Our public school system must send
forth citizens who are not only honest,
but who will be accepted as honest
by the community. We must keep our
hands clean. There must be no smell
of smoke, on our garments. We must
avoid all-appear'ances of evil. In the
world the products of ou'r educational
system will meet the supreme test.
"Our graduates must be men and
women who instinctively and inces-
santly oppose the business man who
profiteers, laboring man who shirks,
politician who sacrifices public wel-
fare to private gain, the citizen who
enjoys the blessing of American citi-

octor nur-
lic schoolsj
ing in in-
itual good{

N CIGAR STORE
AND POCKET BILLIARDS
baccos, Candies. Soft'Drinks, Ice Cream
ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS
e lI

"Present day Greece exists under a
great handicap-her marvelous past,"
said Miss Marie Economidy, the rep-
resentative of the Greek government
which is sending its art exhibit to
Ann Arb~or, beginning Monday and
continuing until July 20, in Alumni
hall. No admission will be charged.
"People seem to forget," she said,
"what modern Greece is doing, in their
worship of our ancestors. They come
to our countryy in search of ruins, and
forget to learn of the modern state.
They do not realize that Kostes Pala-
mas, who is said by French critics to
be the best in Europe, is a Greek;
that Greece has sculptors and artists
who are famous beyond Greece.
Proud of Ancestors ,
"We 'are proud of ou ancestors,"
she continued, "but we feel that mod-,
ern Greece deserves dome apprecia-
tion. You know right now Woman's
Suffrage is one of the problems which
we are now meeting. In the next few
years Greece-will be the one to lead
her neighbors to higher culture."
It is for this purpose that the Greek
government has sent the art exhibit
on its tour of the United States and
Europe. During the Peace conference
it was on exhibit in Paris, and since
that time it has been in Baltimore,
New York, Philadelphia, and finally it
has reached -Ann Arbor through the
efforts of Prof. John Winters of the
Cla.ssical Archaeology departhent.
Some months ago, on first reading of
the exhibit in New York, Professor
Winter wrote, asking that the exhibit
be sent here, and he was successful.
Many Views Cotained
Contained in the exhibit are views
of, many of the ancient works of art,
costumes of the Greek women, and
samples ofd pottery. As Miss Econo-
midy says, it is the same as a half
hour in Greece. Wonderful pictures
of the Parthenon, the Erichtheum, the
Propylea, and other works of ancient
and modern Greece are included.
"It is not ruins alone that we show,"
said Miss Economidy. "The purpose
is to show a continual history of
Greece from the prehistoric temples at
Knossus, some 3,000 years before
Christ, reproductions of the Parthe-
non at a later date, and then the mod-
ern Greece."
Around the upper lecture room in
Alumni Memorial hall will be placed
hundreds of these beautiful pictures.
and the exhibits of pottery, embroidery
and dress work of the women will be
in the center of the room.
Boissonas Takes Pictures
Many of the pictures were taken by
Frederick Boissonas, a Swiss archae-
ologist, who also finds time for his-
torical work, and the results of his
work are remarkable. Views of the
sunset on the Propylea and the Par-
thenon and also a rainstorm on the
Parthenon are well done, and the
scenic pictures of the Island of Nios,
Mount Olympus, the name of which has
now been changed to Peak Venizelos,
zenship but accepts none of its obliga-
tions, the radical who destroys with-
out building up, and the conservative
who idealizes the past and neglects
the supreme duties of the present..
Educational Fature at Stake
"The real future of our educational
system is at stake. The present situa-
tion in America is critical. Our most
glorious days are ahead, i we can
train a generation of boys and girls
who will work accurately, who will be
thoroughly aroused to the full glories
of being alive, who will understand
their own day, and, above all, who wil
be genuinely trustworthy. These are
not new duties. They are the old

tasks accentuated by the demands of
our new day."
Doctor Burton's speech of Thursday
night was the first public address that
he has delivered since becoming offi-
fCcial head of the VJniversity. The entire
lower floor of Hill auditorium was
filled with Sumner School students,
faculty members, and townspeople.

the regions of Qlympus and Eleusis]
are also wonderful]
Many quaint scenes are shown,
among them being the custom of theI
brides weaving a large handkerchiefi
for weeping,-the larger the better,
for it denotes a dutiful daughter,--F
and the betrothal scene of a Greeks
boy .and maiden. Throughout all'
Greece one goes with the pictures,
scenes of Crete, Athens, Olympus, and
Ithaca being prominent among them.
.ike Trip to Greece
"It is just like a trip to Greece," said
Miss Economidy. "To those who have
been there it will recall familiar
scenes; to those who have read of our
country it will make visible the many,
scenes; and to thosewho know noth-
ing of it a visit to this exhibit will be,
entertaining.".
"Greece is now looking into the fu-
ture," she said. "But by no means are
we neglecting the past, of which we
are justly proud, and we care for it
with the greatest zel.,
SSummer Engineers
Hold Convention
Speaking to the engineer students
of the Summer session in -their con-
vocation, held yesterday morning in
room 348, Engineering building, Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley emphasized the
importance of dev'eloping self-reliance
to meet, and solve the problems inci-
dent to their work, and urged them
to regard the summer instruotion as
an important part of their course, and
not as a side issue in their educatioal
program Every advantage offered
during the summer should be utilized
to the fullest extent, he said.
The honor system effective in the
engineering department throughout
the winter was discussed to acquaint
with its princi'ples students who are
for the first time enrolled in the de-
partment. The honor system will re-
main in force through the summer.
William Clarkson was elected presi-
dent and William Harrison secreta
of the engineers' summer organization.
Prof. J. C. Parker presided at the
convocation.
ENROLLMENT SHOWS
SLIGHT INCREASE
Figures of the Summer session en-
rollment given out last evening by
Dean Kraus showed a slight increase
over the number registered on Thurs-
day. The attendance was estimated at
2,201.
There was no special increase in any
department, the advance being on a
whole equally divided among the vari-
ouk schools in proportion to the form-
er enrollment. .: 'l
SCHOOL OF MUSIC FACULTY
ASSISTS IN ADRIAN RECITAL
Several members of the University
School of Music faculty assisted in a
recital of the Adrian College choral
association June 15 at Adrian. Rob-
ert Dieterle's work was especially
commended by The Adrian Daily Tele-
gram, which contained a story of the
conert.
Wolverine Classified Ads bring re-
sults. Ads should be brought in by 2
o'clock before day to be run.
WANTED-Waiters and student help
at Freeman's, one block north of
Hill auditorium.

AT THE MAJESTIC
In his latest picture, "The Dancin'
Fool," which will be shown at The
Majestic Sunday, Monday, and Tues-
-day, Wallace Reid becomes a jazz
hound, making his fortune by dancing
in' Broadway cabarets together with
Bebe Daniels. However, this is just
a side issue with him-a night's diver-
sion by which, he cleans up $200 a
week-for he is really' interested in
his uncle's jug business.
It takes Wally Reid with his breezy
ways to make this picture a go, and
he does it from start to finish. Sup-
porting him are Bebe Daniels, Tully
Marshall, and Lillian Larkins. Late
hours apparently don't hurt Wally,
"Ves" Jones in the pictur4, as a sales-
man and business man, for he man-
ages to make quite a bit of money for
his uncle, who was so old-fashioned
that he couldn't see the usefulness of
his nephew for some time.
"Victory," Maurice * Torneur's latest
production, has its last showing this
afternoo nand evening at The Majes-
tic. The plot-'of this drama-4 laid in
the South- ' ea islands, where Jack
Holt, playing the role of Axel Heyst,
begins to realize something more out
of life than cynicism.
AT THE ARCADE
"The Fortune Teller," featuring
Marjorie Rambeau, will have its last
showing this afternoon and evening at

a comedy -y bMr. anu Mrs. uarter i
Haven, "Rarebits." A superstition
wife, who believes that the cards wi
foretell the future, is portrayed by Mi
Rambeau in this picture, and how tl
lives of the different characters c
run along the channels, which tf
cards point out for them, is shov
here.
Mary Pickford comes to the Arca
Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday. T
picture, which features the famo'
star this times is "Suds," a scre
adaptation of the stage play, "Op
Me Thumb," and this attraction w
secured-for the special Fourth of Ju
shows.
Extreme care has been taken wi
this production by Miss Pickford, wl
supervised the work of her scenar
writers in adapting the play to t
screen. An especially picked cast w
selected for the show, great care ha
ing to be taken to secure the prop
people for the character roles.
Cast 'as a homely little slavey in
French laundry of the London slun
Mary Pickford, as Amanda Afflic
weaves a wonderful romance for he
self about the possessor of a shi
When the owner of the shirt appea
who Mary says comes to tell her th
she can once more return to court i
from which she came, she finds hers(
in somewhat of a predicament, but s
bluffs her way through the situati
and saves her face before the spe
bound girls, which must be seen to
appreciated.

SUNDAY SERVICES

First
Baptist Church

r

Church of Christ
DISCIPLES
South University Ave.
across from
Alumni Memorial jHall

Huron St., below State
JOHN MASON WELLS,
PASTOR

AST' TIMES TODAY
OR IE RA EAU-
IN
FOURTUNE TELLER"
nedy "Rarebits" -:- Adults 25c Childera 18c
OW - MONDAY -' TUESDAY
SI

Morning Service at 10:30
Subject: "The Industrial Creed
of the Church."
Guild Class -for Summer School
Students at 12 o'clock
will be addressed by, Geo. El.
Myers, Ph.D., Professor of In-
dustrial Educatibn.

Bible School.........9:30
Morning Service....,.10:30
Subject: "The Social Platform c
Christian Churches."
We extend a cordial welcome t
the Summer School Students
F. B. ARTHUR PASTOR
First Unitarian

_i

famous stage success, "Op 0' Me Thumb"

A

FIRST
M THO"IST'CHURCH

COR. SOUTH STATE AND
EAST WASHINGTON STS.
REV. ARTHUR W. STALKER,
D.D., PASTOR
10:30 A. M.
"The Church in, the Modern
World"
12:00,m.
. Students' Bible Class.
Leader, Dr. Stalker.
6:30 P. M.
Young People's Devotional
Meeting.
Leader: Robert Kneebone,
President of the Guild
A CHURCH WITH A
HEARTY WELCOMEF

Church

Cor. State and Huron Sts.
Rev. Sidney S. Robins, Pastor
Morning Service, 10:30
Subject:
"Social Platform of Unitarian
and Federated Churches."
At close ' of service subject
will be thrown open for a period
of questions and discussion..
Strangers are always welcome

I

-iI

I

V.

'o I

>rd in an entirely different characterization--
:kney laundry drudge who builds the loveli-
istles out of soap suds.

L4

THE FIRST

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

..

II

MR. DOUGLAS SPEAKS AT 10:30

I

q

TOMORROW

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron Rive

ON

CHRISTIE COMEDY
"EAT-A-EITE-A-PIE,,

Children
loo

"We give a SCENT with every flower"
BLUMAIZE BLOSSOM SHOP
4 Nickels Arcade Phone 600M

NATIONAL CHARACTER"

SOME CURIOUS ASPECTS OF OUR

lOWS AT
0-7:00-8:30

DAILY SHOWS AT
2:00-3:30-7:00-8:10

LULLREUIEUMO

*OdQWQW 6'4 60 6WW 61M'4 640k!

I'

Th-e Presbyterian Churc
HURON AND DIVISION STREETS
'Morning Service, 10:30. Leonard A. Barrett speaks. Subject: "Christianity and
Problem." Following the morning service Prof. Theo. R. Running will speak
for SUMMER STUDENTS on "A Four Dimentional World."
Christian Endeavor Service, 6:30 p. ni., in the Parlors of the Church.

h

the Industrial
to Bible Class

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan