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August 12, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-12

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THE WOLVERINE

DI

ILLINOISU TO INSTALL
URSE FOR COACHES

TODAY AND TOMORROW

HARRY MOREYI

BETTY

And
BLYTHE

- in-
"THE MAN
WHO WON"
BY CYROUS TOWNSEND BRADY
Thursday and Friday
CO NST A N C E
TALMADGE
IN
"Happiness
A LA Mode"
A breezy, farcical comedy
plus drama.
x ,
TR OY 'AIL OP ED
SOFT COL LARS
FIT WELL-WASH EASILY
Cluett, Peabody Co., Inc., Troy, N. Y.
MAJESTIC
MAJESTIC ORCHESTRA Nightly-All Shows Sunda
Aug 13-14-Vivian Marti in "You Never
Saw Such a Girl." Bray Pictograph.
A Christie Comedy.
Aug 10-11-12 -Marguerite Clark in
"Let's Elope." "The Little Widow."
Burton Holmes Travels.
ARCADE
Shows at 3:00; 7:00; 8:3
Phones :
Theatre, 2g6-M Mgr's Rea., 2316-M
Tue-Wed-12- 13-Harry Morey in "The
Man 'Who Won ;" Star Comedy, "Half
and Half" and News Weekly.
Thu-Fi-14- 15-Constance Talmadge in
"Happiness a l Mode;" Judge Rum-
mey Cartoon, "Twinkle-Twinkle" and
Ford Wekly. 25.
WUERTH THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
Tues-Wed-1213-Harry Carey in "A
Fight for Love" with a Lloyd Comedy
and Kinogram Weekly.
Thurs-Fri-14-15-"RULING PASSIONS"
a six-reel special with a two-reel L-Ko
Comedy, "Two Gun Trixie."
Sat-16--William Desmond in "Bare Fist-
ed Gallagher" with a News and Ar-
buckle Comedy.
IN "A SPORTING CHANCE" with a
Tom Mix Comedy, "Soft Tender Foot."
Tues-Wed-19-20-J. Warren Kerrigan in
"The Best Man" with a Lloyd Comedy
and Kinogram Weekly.
Thurs-Fri-21-22-Theda Bara in "The
Siren's Song" with a L-Ko Comedy,
Brown's Eyes and Bank Notes."
ORPHEUM THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
Tues-Wed-12-13-Corinnne Gritith in
"A Girl at-Bay."3Also "THE SILENT
MYSTERY," No. 13. 41
Thurs-Fri - 14-15 - House Peters in
Thunderbolts of Fate" with a News
and Comedy,
Sat-1-Pauline Frederick in "Out of
the Shadows" (Ret.) with a News and
Comedy.
Sun-Mon - 17-18 - "THREE GREEN
EYES" an all star cast with a Mutt &
Jeff Cartoon Comedy and Ford Weekly.
Tues-Wed - 19-20 - E. K. Lincoln in
"Fighting Thro" with "The Silent Mys-
ter," No. -14.
Thurs- Fri-2 1 -22-"Broncho Billy"-Gil-
b.rt Anderson in "Son of a Gun" with
a News and Comedy.

"ILL CARANT B.S. DEGREE AT END
OF FOUR YEARS; COURSE TO
OPEN SEPT. 22
Urbana, Ill., Aug. 1.-Men who wish
to become athletic coaches can here-
after get a four-year college course in
coaching, with a degree, and can go
forth educationally equipped for any
other profession. The University of
Illinois has established a course in
coaching, which will open on Sept. 22.
Those who complete it will receive the
degree of achelor of Science. The
course will be under the department of
athletic coaching and physical educa-
tion, which has recently been estab-
lished. George A. Huff, for twenty-
four years director of athleticsand
baseball coach here, is the head of the
new department.
In an official statement from the uni-
versity it is declared that the an-
nouncement of this course is an im-
portant sign of the trend of the times.
It is pointed out that once the athletic
coach was regarded by college facul-
ties as more or less of a necessary evil.
Now it is realized, so it is stated, that
athletics and physical education must
receive more emphasis in the universi-
ties, colleges and secondary schools of
the country. That means that there
must be trained men to direct this
work.
Day of Self-ade Coai Passing
Most coaches thus far have been ed-
ucated for other fields--law, medicine,
engineering, teaching. Coaching as se-
rious work was often a stop gap or an
Jfterthought. Beyond their own exper-
ience in 'athletics coaches have been
self-taught as coaches. Butthe day of
the self-made coach, it is predicted, is
possing. Few colleges or high schools
are willing to allow their teams to be
practice material for would-be coaches
who plan to pick up their training as
they go along. Besides, it takes too
long. The demand for trained coaches
is immediate and pressing, for the war
has given a tremendous stimulus to
athletics and physical education.
Scope of Course
The coaching course here will in-
clude a study of baseball, football, bas-
ket ball, track and field athletics, swim-
ming, gymnostics, hygiene, training
and massage, anthropometry, play-
ground management, and the organiza-
tion of teams. There will be class-
room work and training on the field
as well. In addition to these technical
training courses there will be required
courses such as education, psychology,
rhetoric and public speaking, and the
student will have general elective
courses from which to choose. So he
will have a pretty fair general educa-
tion on top of his special training.
Teaching Staff
Lieutenant George Clark, well-
known Illinois athlete, just home from
France, who was a member of the
phamppnship football and baseball
teams of the A. E. F., and Major John
L. Griffith, executive head of athletic'
activities in army training camps, for-
merly director of athletics at Drake
university, have been engaged as in-
structors, in addition to the coachesof
the Illinois 'varsity teams.
The nucleus of the instructional staffd
will be the group of Illinois coaches
who have been responsible for the
record of Illinois athletic teams for the
last ten years: George A. Huff, base-
ball; Harry L. Gill, track and field1
athletics; Robert C. Zuppke, football;
Ralph R. Jones, basketball; E. J. Man-
ley, swimming, and A. J. Schuettner,
gymnastics.
The university has issued a circulor
descriptive of the new department and.
its courses.

TIIOU ANDS VISIT U. S. FLEET
ANCHORED AT LOS ANGELES
Los Angeles, Aug. 11.-Thousands of
residents of Los Angeles and other
nearby towns and cities today for the
first time saw or trod the decks of an
American dreadnaught, when they vis-
ited this port where the Pacific fleet
arrived yesterday. Other thousands
gathered in Exposition park to hear
an address by Secretary of the Navy
Daniels

HUN DIPLOMATS
TO BE TRADERS
Berlin, Aug. 11.-No sujject is be-
ing considered more seriously in Ger-
many than the future of German ex-
port trade, which was discussed yester-
day in a lecture by the chief of the
foreign trade section of the foreign
office, Herr Weidenfeld, a recognized
expert in German trade natters.
Herr Weidenfeld said Germany
would be compelled now, as before the
war, to import food and raw materials
and to export manufactured products
of great value. Both, call for a good
intelligence service coming from
abroad and proceeding from Germany.
England, America and Japan have
made great efforts in this domain since
the armistice. Germany is attempting
the same by creating a foreign trade
section of the foreign office.
Its first task is the preliminary edu-
cation of officials abroad in the diplo-
matic and consular 'services, which
henceforth will not represent two car-
eers. The principle adopted for these
officials is, in the first place, an eco-
nomic education, and as soon as offi-
cials abroad begin to get active they
will be supplied with reports as to the
current German economic situation.
Representatives abroad will have to
use their own initiative more than be-
fore in reporting. Their reports and
those of the private reporters then will
be utilized for the foreign trade sec-
tion. The second task of the foreign
trade section lies in communicating in-
telligence quickly to interested parties.
WOMEN TO HAE, FINL
GATHING THURSDAY
LEAGUE SUCCESSFUL IN SUMMER
SCHOOL SOCIAL ACTIVI-
TIES
As hostess for the last supper event
of the Women's league, Mrs. Edward
H. Kraus will entertain from 3 to 6
o'clock Thursday afternoon at her
home, 722 Church street. This will be
the final opportunity for summer
school women to enjoy meeting so-
cially as a collective body of repre-
sentatives from Michigan and a large
number of other universities.
Begining with an opening tea at
Helen Newberry residence, the pro-
gram' of the league's activities has
continued successfully through the
past six weeks. Delcia Gilbert, '20,
who is acting president of the organi-
zation this summer, states that the
major aim of the league in bringing
the women together has been realized
satisfactorily, and that the response
of students to the membership cam-
paign has been most cordial.
The Women's league, which was or-
ganized in 1890, has been gradually
assuming a more and mor active
part in the affairs of the campus, its
membership during the last collegiate
year numbering 1,200 women. Through-
out its history, its function has been
mutual improvement and helpfulness
among ,the women of the University.
Among other things, it acted as spon-
sor for the introduction of regulated
league houses, the junior advisor sys-
tem, and the securing of Barbour gym-
nasium. During the war it maintain-
ed a large war work committee which
directed the interests of the women in
knitting, caring for the S. A. T. C.
sick, and various other activities of
the military regime. So complete have
its services now become that its com-
mittees now number 14, and include

everything from the scholastic and so-
cial phases of college life to the vo-
cational guidance and life membership
committees. Its president for the en-
suing year is Marguerite Chapin, '20.
POLISH ARMY UNDERTAKES NEW
OFFENSIVE AGAINST REDS
Basle, Aug. 11.-A Polish army has
left Minsk to undertake a new offen-
sive against the bolsheviki, according
to a wireless dispatch from Warsaw.
The troops are said to be well train-
ed and to be supported strongly by
artillery. Delegations from the for-
mer Russian province of Volhynia,
another dispatch from Warsaw says,
have expressed to the Allied minsters
in the Polish capital the desire of their
country to be a part of Poland.
AURORA BOREALIS HANDICAPS
TELEGRAPH SERVICE IN U. S.
New York, Aug. 11. - The aurora
borealis or "Northern Lights" played
hob with press and commercial tele-
graph wires this afternoon, causing
numerous "breaks" and delaying news
and messages throughout the United
States north of the Mason and Dixon
line. At frequent intervals the power-
ful electric currents of the aurora
borealis suffused ordinary currents
and completely stopped transmission.

i

EASTERN COLLEGES TO ENCOUR-
AGE GIVING BACK OF E6IER-
GENCY DEGREES
New York, Aug. 11.-Harvard, Yale,
and Princeton have decided to allow
undergraduates to return the emer-
gency degrees they received during the
'war and will encourage them to ob-
tain the regular A. B., or B. S. de-
grees when the college reopens next
month. It has also been decided to
permit the holders of the "war de-
grees" who return to college in quest
of regular sheepskins to take part in
intercollegiate athletics.
This ruling on the part of these three
colleges will have an important bear-
ing on the coming football season and
will permit the return of several grid-
iron stars who received degrees under
the war curricula. Harvard will be
particularly affected because the rul-
ing permits the return of Ralph Hor-
ween, who played for two years in the
Harvard backfield. He is a good run-
ning, kicking, and passing half back
and should make Eddie Casey, the star
of the 1916 Crimson eleven extend
himself for supremacy behind the line.
'At the present time he and a number
of other players, including his younger
brother, Arnold Horween, center; John
Desmond, tackle or end; Nils Nelson,
half back, and Philip Philbin, are do-
ing light work every afternoon on
Soldiers' Field. It was Horween's drop
kick that defeated Princeton 3 to 0 in
1916.
Harvard Loses Players
The Harvard line has lost two very
strong players with the season about'
two months away. The most serious
football calamity is the injury to Ar-
thur Clark's back, which will prevent
him trying for a position at guard this
fall. Clark severely wrenched his
back recently while playing golf, and
is just able to be about now with the
aid of a cane. His doctor absolutely
has forbidden him to play football
again.
George L. Batchelder is to be the sec-
ond absentee. He was captain of the
second university crew which defeat-
ed Yale in June, and a few days before
the race injured one of his knees,
which, however, was made fit for the
race. Batchelder is afraid he will re-
injure his knee, and will therefore
pass up the gridiron for rowing. He'
is one of the men who plan to ex-
change their war degree and made
their "H" as an end on Harrie Dad-
mun's 1916 eleven.
First Practice
Waldron P. Belkriap, manager of the
Harvard football team, talked over af-
fairs with Robert T. Fisher, the head
coach, during his visit to Cambridge
last week, but the only announcement
made was that the first practice for
candidates will be held on Soldiers'
field Monday afternoon, Sept. 8. It is
expected from that date on practice
will be held twice daily, with the ex-
ception of Saturdays, until college re-
opens.
Coach Fisher, schooled in Haughton

NEW RULING TO PERMIT
FOOTBALL1 MEN'S RETURN

,football, will teach that system and
endeavor to surround himself with the
best of the former coach's assistants.
Derria Parmenter, a former center,
will be one of his associates, and it is
expected that Reginald W. P. Brown
will renew his contract as scout and
strategic coach. Charles Coolidge and
William Snow of the 1916 team will
assist with the development of the
ends and guards, respectively.
Haughton to Help
Percy Haughton has promised to
help out when he can, and Leo Leary
may give the men on Soldiers' field a
little of his attention when practice
gets started. At this stage of the
season, although it is too early to -as-
sume a positive position, Harvard's
weakness seems to be the lack of sea-
soned coaching material, although
when Head Coach Fisher gets ready
to announce his staff these fears may
appear groundless.'.
The material for the team will be
exceptional, and, accorded all the ad-
vantages that his predecessor enjoyed,
there apears td be every reason to be-
lieve that Fisher will be a successful
gridiron instructor. He has the sys-
tem, and his success remains primarily
with himself and those he is able to
secure for his coaching staff.

AT THE ARCADE

AT THE THI

Harry T. Morey has another fine
in "The Man Who Won," which
be presented at the Arcade today
tomorrow. The story is by C
Townsend Brady, and is all "rME
without any "padding." There is
tion from beginning to end. The i
tery element is well planted in
first few feet of the film and this
ries ri<-it along successfully until
last. Betty Blythe, who has appe4
with Morey in some of his recent
tures, again plays opposite the sta
On Thursday and Friday Consta
Talmadge,will be shown in her la
picture, "Happiness a la Mode." I
' young and beautiful wife loses
husband and then wins him b
again is delightfully portrayed by (
stance Talmadge in this feature.
DE AN J. R. EFFINGER AND WIF
LEAVE FOR ADIRONDA4
Dean John R. Effinger and Mrs.
finger left Friday for Piseka, N.
in the Adirondacks. Dean Effinger
pects to remain on his vacation t
the middle of September.

A

I

lk

8

Fig
Re
I
Pu
on ti
capa

- -
Lake ]Erie's
nest Resorts are
2ached via. Ashley&
istin Steamer Line
y4
Rcursions Every Day
t-in-Bay-Cedar Point 'reached every day
he magnificent steel steamer Put-in-Bay,
city 3,200 people.

Big Hotel Victory now open at Put-in-Bay.
Hotel Breakers and the world's greatest bathing beach at Cedar Point.
Excursions every day to Put-in-Bay. To Ohio Points via A.& D Line and
Fare round-trip week days - - $ .80 connecting trolley - lipes reduce,
Fareround-trip Sundays aadHolidays 1.10 fare one-half.
Five hours on the boat. Leaving Detroit at 9:00 a. m., returning at 8:00 p. tn.
Cedar Point Excursions on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.
Steamer Frank E. Kirby leaving Detroit at 8 a. i., returning at 11:50 p.m.
Five hours at Cedar Point. Fare round Trip SL00. On Steamer Put-in-
Bay Friday and Sunday $1.35 round trip.
Finsel's music for dancing Ashley & Dustin Steamer Lino
on Steamer Put-in-Bay. Ball First Street Wharf Detroit, bMicb.
room, largest on lake steam-
ers. No charge for dancing. Write For Our Map Showing
p Lake Erie Reso'ts

I II

- - . . ~
.. .



1!-

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"I

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LOST
LOST-Fountain pen on Thursday, be-
tween Physics Laboratory and Eco-
nomics Bldg. Initials, M. A. D.
Call 2618. 1331 Washtenaw.

LOST
LOST-Or taken by mistoke from Li-
brary Desk, Note Book, Sat. night
between 9 and 10. Call 299-M.
LOST-Let the Wolverine help find

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