100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 12, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 L W V L~ V L It 1 114 L

-_

olverne

e

.

OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday afternoons
Entered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second-class matter
Subscription by carrier or mail, $:.oo
Offices: Ann Arbor'Press Building, Maynard Street
Phones: Business-96o; Editorial-2414
fice Hours: Managing Editor-:oo to 2:oo o'clock daily except saturday; Business
Manager-- :oo to 2:oo o'clock daily except Saturday
ommunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
in print, but as an evidence of faith, and notices of events will be published in The
erine at the discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to the office.
Jnsigned communications will receive no consideration. No manuscript wll be returned
s the writer incloses postage.
'he Wolverine does not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed in the communications.
Mark K.'Ehbert..................Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 2227-M
J. Ellsworth Robinson...............Business Manager
Phone 2414 or x505
er M. Campbell.............City Editorj Howard Weeks...............Column Editor
a Marx................Associate Editor Martha Guernsey............Women's Editor
Mark B. Covell............Assistant Business Manager
Thornton W. Sairgent Jr...,.................Issue Editor
REPORTERS
F. G. Merz J. E. Beretta, Robert W. Taylor
H. H. Heth Samuel Lamport Edgar L. Rice
Julia Lockwood
BUSINESS STAFF
Schneider Richard Lambrecht
William Wachs
TUESDAY, AUGUST 12, 1919
THE GOLD STAR
We are creatures of vacillating tastes and purposes. One year ago
ing but war dominated our feelings and actions. Now even the mention
lior sounds bromidic. We laugh harder than before, continue our own
-apportioned living, congratulate ourselves that the world is right again.
if we forget too soon the beneficient influence of the dead, then the
ting of the war-unselfishness and tolerance-will be lost.
'here is no finer an appeal and no more symbolic a sermon than that
>wed by the gold star. It has a practical significance. It is the ultra
shievement, made brilliant by the fact that the g'eatest characters were
d upon to make the greatest sacrifices,-those who seemed to have
. life to its utmost but passed through it by the shortest way.
'It is better to die for something worth while than to live for nothing
1," were the candid words of one who fell. What was this something
Ih while? That depended upon the individual interpretation. But this
now, it was not against the name aristocracy or plutocracy that they
ht. The name meant nothing. It was against tyranny as they had seen
:pressed everywhere. It was a call from the meek and the oppressed.
Let us obliterate the Prussian from our own living. Let us have no
uragement to offer the egotist, the self-opinioiated, the self-inflated.
as against such as these that the war was waged. Let us not succumb
e domineering individual just to gain a slothful peace and a little praise
popularity ourselves. Let us cease to live for nothing much at all.
[here is a soul of democracy, and there is also its empty shell. That is
nessage of the gold star.
MIDDLE CLASS OPINION
[n a book on the theater, Clayton Hamilton divides all people into
o classes according to their mental attitude toward any subject- a lower
, a middle class, and an upper class. "The lower class," he says, "is
)osed oil those people who know nothing at all about the subject in
tion; the middle class is composed of those people who know a little
t the subject, but not much; and the upper class is composed of those
le who know a great deal about it. Any single individual may hold .a
r class opinion on one subject, a middle class opinion on another, and
pper'class opinion on a third."
A. man may be an expert in some things, he may know a little about
y things, and he knows nothing at all about a great many. Hamilton
es his theory to examples in literature and the drama. But it applies
Mly woll to all walks in life, and the finding is that the great mass
ople are of the middle class variety. It is always the.middle class opin-
which, because the majority entertains it, has the greatest authority
.e world, and which is most assertive in its doctrines. The people who
r nothing about the subject usually are content to folow the majority,
e those who know a great deal about it are usually silent in the face of
lar thought. They are the cultured, educated people, as a rule, and
r than conflict with the masses, are content to keep their opinons to
selves.;
Middle class opinion decides the conventions, prescribes the laws, is
yrant of our moIern civilization, and very often it says "Do this" to
thing which upper class opinion would call absurd, and the lower
foolish. But the majority rules, and the two minority classes follow,
good-naturedly, the other tolerantly. One has not the will to resist,
ther would not care to take the trouble to. Perhaps it is best to let

le class opinion rule, for the majority is at least the sqfest.
But it is the upper class, the experts, the ones who know a great deal
t the subject who have been the real leaders in the long run." Middle
opinion rules for the day, but its rule is based on the upper class opin-
of the past. Middle class opinion laughed at the telegraph, the tele-
e, the steamship, the airplane. But upper class opinion stuck silently
grimly to the task, and succeeding middle class opinion gets the full
fit.
People belong to the lower class because circumstances are against
learning. They belong to the upper class because their natures are
fied with nothing less. The middle class is composed of those in be-
n. Only a few reach the heights. Many, though there should be none,
n the lower class. The others are the middle class-and that is the
that most of us can hope for. But our ideal, at least, should be to have
pper class opinion.
[en theaters are elosed in New York, as a result of the actors' strike.
country won't mind the strike so much if the right theaters are closed.
the Ford-Tribune trial is coming to an end after 14 weeks. It can't be
the lawyers have already earned enough to retire?
,atest definition for Optimist: A man who takes all the lemons handed
and makes lemonade out of them.
teparation experts are chosen by Germany. It will take experts, all

On the Other Hand-
Jever go to a movie
And get all set
In your seat'
For the big feature film
And then have
All these appear,
"Why Angie Ate the Buttermilk,"
A Three Star Hennessy Picture
In two reels and
A couple of staggers,
Starring Miss Lilac Ell,
Supported by Lionel Sportshirt,
Under the ownership of Samuel Cohen,
Director, Pat M'Back,
Assistant Director, J. Isadore Knob,
Photographed by John Smith,
Scenario written by Hommond Deggs,"
And lots more
But what's the use,
You know it all?
Need a New Pair of Pants, Henry
The Free Press says, "Ford's Big
Suit In Last Stages"
An Article_ by Lina Caalier, tie
Greatest Living Beauty, (So Says
the Paper) On Golf
"One of the great benefilts of golf
playing to a woman is that it teaches
concentration. The eye must be kept
upon the ball, not before it is struck
or while it is leaving the sward, but
after it has left the ground."
It would be a great delight to see
Lina play. She doesn't keep her eye
on the ball at all, only after it has
left the ground. This must solve a
problem for many golufer. Just think,
you can light a cigarette or like Lina,
powder the nose while the ball is be-
ing struck, as she so tersely puts it.
It must be a great sight to see Lina
cavort on the tee. She probably
drives a tennis racket and putts with
a croquet mallet.
Come and Get It!
They are going to dispose of the sur-
,plus army chow to the public. Can
you imagine a bird who just got out
and came home and his wife dished
him up slumgullion and prunes?
Some of those prunes ought to have
chevrons on them. Just think what
they've been through. Back and forth
from mess line to mess line and still
they hold up.
Well we know of about four million
men who won't guy any of this chow.
And that leaves out the navy.
This food inquiry goes on and on
and still the coldrosbif is just the same
at our hash house.
These Russian Loafers!
A headline says:
"Sugar $5 a Lump
In Petrograd Famine"
The squirrel that works in one of
the town jewelry stores said that a
good looking femme came in the other
day and said, "I want a spoon." He
said, "Sure, I'm off at nine, where'll I
meet you?"

The Summer Choral union will make
its only public appearance at the last
of the weekly concerts of the School
of Music to be given at 2 o'clock Wed-
nesday evening in Hill auditorium.
Miscellaneous vocal and instrumental
offerings will make up the rest of the
program.
The Choral union has been rehears-
ing Massenet's idyl "Narcissus" for
some weeks, under the direction and
leadership of Mr. Earl V. Moore of the
School of Music. The solo parts of
this popular idyl will be taken by
James Hamilton, tenor, as Narcissus,
and Ione Wilber, soprano, as a
nymph. Both of these singers have
been heard before in the summer con-
certs and were received enthusiastical-
ly.
Miss Wilber will sing a group of
songs in addition to her solo numbers
in the choral offering. Thenchorus
will also render two other numbers.
Miss Nell B. Stockwell, of the fac-
ulty of therSchool of Music, will con-
tribute a group of piano solos.
The complete program is as follows:
Widmung ........... Schumann-Liszt
Barcarolle ...............Rubinstein
En Courant...................Godard
Intermezzo, Op. 76; No. 3.. Brahms
Polonaise, Op. 40, No. 1........ Chopin
Nell B. Stockwell
Narcissus, An Idyl .... .. ..Massenet
Soloists
Miss Ione Wilber, soprano, (A Nymph)
Mr. James Hamilton, tenor, (Narcissus)
The Summer Choral Union.
Earl V. Moore, Conductor
La Lettre d'Adieu ............ Kriens
Chanson Revee ......... .....Pesse
The Jasamine Door ...........Scott
Miss Wilber
Agnus Dei .................. Widor
The Miller's Wooing........ Fanning
The Summer Choral Union
Piano accompaniments by Mr. Burton
Garlinghouse.
Organ accompanigents by Mrs. Elsie
Kempton.
ARCHITECTURAL EXHIBIT BEING
HELD NOW IN MEMORIAL HALL
Under the direction of Prof. Emil
Lorch an exhibit of the work of the
architectural college is now being
held in Memorial hall, and will con-
tinue during the next two weeks.
Elementary, intermediate, and ad-
vanced design and the allied arts are
included in this exhibit, the most strik-
ing features of which are plans for a
campus theater.
CAPT. J. S. SWITZER,'16,
RETURNS FROM OVERSEAS
Capt. J. S. Switzer, '16, star Varsity
tennis player during his four years in
the University, returned from France
on the transport Imperator which
reached New York Sunday. He fought
with the eighth machine-gun battalion
of the third division of regulars while
overseas. Captain Switzer expects to
remain in the army permanently.
BRITISH FLYER LEAVES N. Y.
ON DASH TO NEW ORLEANS
Port Washington, N. Y., Aug. 11. -
Maj. Sidney E. Parker, British avia-
tor, accompanied by a mechanic, left
here at 2:30 p. m. today in his flying
boat, the Sea Gull, for New Orleans
by way of the great lakes and the
Mississippi river.

fusic Notes

M I D SU MM E R
BOOK SALE
OUR TABLES AND COUNTERS ARE FAIRLY GROANING
WITH BARG AINS
in books of Education, History, EconomIcs, Mathematics, Chemistry,
etc. Come early and bring your basket.
Wahr's University Bookstores
For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASK US
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
p: 101-105 . Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

i,

Go to LYNDON'S 719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Eastman Kodaks Eastman Films
GUARANTEED AMATEUR FINISHING
ENLARGEMENTS FROM YOUR NEGATIVES A SPECIALTY
We have led in amateur finishing for twelve years and are still lead-
ing:-Why? Because we give you QUALITY. We guarantee our devel-
oping r no charge. We have the latest and-best equipped store in the
State ano our help is experienced in every line of Photography.
IF YOU WANT SATISFACTION BRING YOUR FILMS TO
two Doors from TVJ9N .CMDN x North
Hill Auditorium LYNDON & COMPANY UniversityAno

i

LEAVE YOUR FILMS
AT
QUARRY'S DRUG ORE
FOR
THE SWAINS,
TO DEVELOP AND PLINT

BUESCHER SAXOPHONES
Bb Soprano Saxophone, triple silver-plated...................$105.00
Eb Alto Saxophone, triple silver-plated.......................$125.00
C-Melody Saxophone, triple silver-plated..................$135.00
Bb Tenor Saxophone, triple silver-plated...................145.00
Bb Bass Saxophone, triple silver-plated.................... $220.00
SEE AND TRY TIESE BEAUTIFUL INSTRUMENTS AT
SCHAEBERLE & SON, Music House
110 SOUTH MAIN STREET

This Is an Awful Blacka
Japs.
A Berlin official calls
many's only friend.

Eye For the
Japan Ger-

Go Up and See What It Is, Andrew,
and He Did.
Grand Rapids, Aug. 11-Rev. An-
drew Stegenga, 38, pastor of Calvary
Reformed church, arrived home Sun-
day afternoon from a two weeks' va-
cation, to discover gas leaking from a
pipe on the second floor of his home.
He went upstairs, turned on an
electric light, a short circuit resulted
and the roof was blown from the
house. His hair and shirt were burn-
ed and he is suffering from serious
burns on the fact, arms and body.
The pastor's wife, who remained
down stairs, was uninjured.
Any Relation to Don't?
Harry Blamey motored to this city
Sunday. A. A. Times-News.
Here's a Place for the Old Bull.
Wanted-Young man for the china
dept. Permanent position.
Mrs. Hart Wants the Neighbors To
Get It Right.x
On Aug. 9 it was stated that the rent
of Mrs. J. F. Hart of 6106 Champlain
Ave. had been raised from $35 to $50
a month. Mrs. Hart writes that the
rent was raised from $54 to $75 a
month.-Chicago Tribune.
If He Did, It Was in the Navy, Because
We Know.
August 12-5 p. m.-The duties of
Sappers in the War, Prof. Lovell. Par-
don us, Professor, did you say sap-
heads, or sappers?
H.W.

Read The Wolverine for Campus
news.

Bathing Suits
WE HAVE THE TWO PIECE KIND WITH
THE WHITE BELT
GEO. J. MOE, "Sport Shop"

DETROIT UNITED LINES'
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars- 8:Io a.
n., and hourly to 8::o p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7 :48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m (EX-
presses tmake local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., 9:05 a,
m. and every two hours to 9:os p. m., zo:so
p. m. To Ypsilanti only.,i11:45 p. in., 12 :20
a. in., x :xo a. m.., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. m. and
11:20 P. .
Absolutely..
The Coolest Place in Town
Air Changed Once a Minute
ICE CREAM and HOME
MADE CANDIES
The Sugar Bowl
Phone 967 109 SO. MAIN
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Anollrbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources.........$4000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

Mid =Su mmer
Sale
All Light
Three-piece Suits
1=4_Off
N. F. ALLAEN CO.
The House of Kuppenhelmer In Ann Arbor

s but it doesn't say as much as it used to.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan