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August 12, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-12

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THE WEATHER

CONTIN ED FAIR
TODATf

LL

Ulnlurrinr

AT YOUR DOOR
THREE TIMES
A WEEK

. X No. 21

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 12, 1919

PRICE THREE CE

WAR DEPARTMENT
TO SLAS H PICES
IN H.C.L.BA TTLE.
GOVERN IENT TO COMBAT PRICES
OF COMMERCIAL
DEALERS
FOOD PRICE DICTATOR
ASKED IN NEW BILL
House Committee Begins Considera-
tion of Cold Storage Legis-
lation

LONDON POLICE
THWART RED PLOT
London, Aug. 11.-Seditious docu-
ments were seized by the police today
in a raid on London's western suburb
of Acton.
The papers captured dealt with a
suggested seizure of arms and ammu-
nition from the military stores by revo-
lutionaries and the establishment of a
soviet government in London.
Important arrests are regarded as
probable in the course of the week in
connection with the seizure. Other'
raids, it is said, are contemplated by
the authorities.'
ANDREPJ CARNEGIE DEAD
RATER 3 DAYS' ILLINESS
PNEUMONIA CAUSES DEATH OFl
PROMINENT FINANCIER AND
PHILANTHROPIST

fichigan Alumnus First American
To Receive Oxford Professorship
To the University of Michigan has elected Fellow in Semitics there in
fallen the honor of having one of her 1903, serving until 1904. He was then
alumni appointed to the first professor- made international fellow of Columbia
ship ever held by an American on the university to France, retaining this

Washington, Aug. 11.-A price war
between the war department and com-
mercial dealers in food-stuffs loomed
this afternoon when it was announced
by the department that, since its an-
nouncement regarding the coming
sales to the public of army surplus
food,. retail dealers handling similar
kinds of food have in many instances
lowered their prices to meet with the
army food quotations. The war de-
partment answered this move by an-
nouncing that it would continue re-
vising its prices downward.
The total value of the surplus food
that has been allotted by the war de-
partment for public sale is $83,459,928,
it was announced this afternoon.
Information in the hands of pack-
ing house inspectors of the depart-
ment of agriculture probably will be
used, should permission be granted by
Secretary Houston, in the department
of justice drive against food profiteer&
ond hoarders.
Furnish Information
Attorney-General Palmer, in a mes-
sage to Secretary Houston this after-
noon, asked that, if consistent, these
inspectors "furnish United States at-
torneys, upon request with informa-
tion within their possession."
The attorney-general instructed
district attorneys thro_, ut the coun-
try to get in touch iihm iately with
the former state food ministrators
and co-operate with the in the cam-
paign to ferret out violat as of the food
control act as rapidly as 'ossible.

faculty of Oxford university. The dis-
tinction comes through the person of
Prof. Stephen Herbert Longdon, '98,
whose appointment to succeed Dr. A.
H. Sayce as professor of Assyriology
has been announced by the authorities
of the museum of the University of
Pennsylvania where Dr. Langdon serv-
ed for the two years as curator of the
Babylonian section.
Dr. Langdon was born in 1876 at
Monroe, Mich., where he studied pre-
poratory to entering the University of
Michigan. He took his Bachelor's de-
gree here in 1898, and the following
year won his Master's diploma. He re-
ceived his B.D. from the Union Theo-
logical seminary in 1903 and his Ph.D.
from Colu bia university in 1904. It
was at the latter institution that his
genius for deciphering the Sumerian
text was first recognized and he was
Decide Doubles
Titles't'omorrow

Lenox, Mass., Aug. 11.-Andrew Car-
negie, one of the world's most prom-
inent financiers, steel magnate and
philanthropist, is dead at his summer
home, "Shadow Brook," of bronchial
pneumonia. He had been ill but three
days and the sudden end, which came
at 7:10 o'clock this morning, was
wholly unexpected.
Had Mr. Carnegie lived until next
Nov. 25 he would have been 84 years
old. At his bedside at the time of
death were Mrs. Carnegie, John Boyn-
ston, his private secretary; the family
physician, and members of his home
>staff. Mrs. Roswell Miller, his daugh-
ter, was not present.
Mr. Carnegie had been enjoying the
summer in the Berkshire hills, spend-
ing most of his time at his favorite
outdoor pastime-fishing. Three days
ago he was stricken with a cold, and
it rapidly developed into pneumonia.'
His condition, however, did not become
alarming until last night. News of
Mr. Carnegie's illness was not known
outside the family circle.
New York, Aug. 11.-The passing of
one of the greatest and certainly the
most picturesque of world financiers,
at his Massachusetts summer home to-
day, aroused much speculation as to
what will become of the Carnegie for-
tune, variously estimated at between
$300,000,000 and $400,000,000.
Andrew Carnegie's wife, who was
LouisehWhitfield, of, New York, sur-
vives him. He leaves only the one
child, Margaret, who recently was mar-

Washington, Aug. 11.-The house
agriculture committee today began
,consideration of cold storage legisla-
tion recommended by the president,
hearing experts from the department
of agriculture. Similar legislotion is
expected to be taken up soon by a
sub-committee of the senate interstate
commerce commission, which was ap-
pointed today by Chairman Cummins.
The sub-committee is composed of
Senators Townsend, of Michigan; La-
Follette, of Wisconsin; Watson, of In-
diana; Underwood, of Alabama; and
Smith, of South Carolina.
Lower Prices Abroad
Senator Myers, Democrat, of Mon-
tana, told the senate today he under-
stood that supplies purchased here
with money loaned by the United
States to foreign governments and the
$100,000,000 fund appropriated by con-
gress to relieve distressed peoples in
Europe, were being sold abroad at
lower prices than those now demanded
of the American people for the same
articles.
The senator was speaking in sup-
port of his resolution requesting the
judiciary committee for an opinion as
to the advisability of restrict exports.
He declared he believed the people of
the United States should not be "bled
white" in order to aid the remainder of
the world.
Price Dictator
A fair price administrator for the
District of Columbia would be pro-
vided for, under a bill being prepared
by district officials for submission to
congress. Announcement to this effect
was made today following a confer-
ence between Federal Trade Commis-
sioners Murdock and Colver and the
district commissioners. The measure
also will p de for the licensing of
all wholes s and retailers of food,
wearing apparel and fuel. The admin-
istrator would Abe given power. to re-
voke licenses of profiteers.
Legislation proposing the licensing
of corporations having capital or as-
sets of $10,000,000 or more and ou-
thorizing federal supervision over the
issuance of stocks and securities, was
introduced today by Senator Kellogg,
Rhe-nicen, nf Minnesota.

ried to Roswell Miller, a young re-
serve officer in the United States navy.
None of the ironmaster's associates
professed to know today what provi-
sion he made for the Millers in his
will, though at 'the time of the wed-
ding Margaret Carnegie was called
"the world's richest heiress."
The "Steelmaster's" end was peace-
ful. He began to experience difficulty
in breathing last evening and physi-
cians were hurriedly summoned from
Pittsfield. They remained at the bed-
side throughout the night, as did Mrs.
Carnegie.
Some few hours after her father's
death Mrs. Miller arrived from Mill-
brook, N. Y., accompanied by her hus-
band.
Lenox, Mass., Aug. 11.-Announce-
ment was made this afternoon that the
funeral of Andrew Carnegie would
be held from the home and would be
strictly private. No date was given
out. It was stated that burial may be
made at Pittsburgh instead of New
York.
In spite of his advanced years the
unexpected death of Mr. Carnegie
startled the summer colony here. To
the neighbors, who saw him fre-
quently, he had become a fixture, and
many failed to realize his declining
physical condition. It was two hours
after his death when the news became
known. Immediately summer colonists
began calling the house by telephone,
and many drove in their cars to the
house.
DR. A. H. LOVELL WILL TALK
ON WAR DUTIES OF SAPPERS
"Duties of Sappers in War" will be
the subject of a lecture by Dr. A. H.
Lovell of the engineering college to
be given at 5 o'clock this afternoon in
the Natural Science auditorium. While
in France as a lieutenant-colonel Dr.
Lovel observed carefully the work of
the sapper, and his lecture will be
a-hr t - fnr ~~ r

Merkel and Munz will play Fisher
and Bassett in the final round of the
doubles tournament at 3:30 o'clock
Wednesday afternoon on Ferry field.
C. N. Mack, Varsity tennis coach; has
agreed to umpire the match and a large
crowd of tennis enthusiasts is expect-
ed to view the battle which will de-
termine the championship of the cam-
pus.
The singles finals will be played at
3:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon. As
a result, the semi-final matches must
be played by Friday night.
Angell has already qualified for the
singles finals, while Munz and Bowers
were given additional time to play off
their preliminary match owing to the
fact that Munz was participating in
another tournament.
Angell defeated Breakey in the up-
per half of the singles semi-finals, 6-3,
6-1. Worth will meet the winner of
the Munz-Bowers match in the other
semi-final. The winners of these semi-
final round battles will clash in the
championship round Saturday after-
noon.
Some fine tennis is expected tomor-
row and Saturday in thenchampionship
games. Merkel and Munz have appear-
ed to best advantage in the doubles
matches to date, but will meet a good
pair in Fisher and Bassett.
Angl and Munz have shown the
most consistent play in the singles,
although Bowers and Worth have
been playing some good tennis.
DEAN E. H. KRAUS TO ADDRESS
EMBALMERS' ASSOCIATION
Dean E. H. Kraus will speak Wed-
nesday afternoon before the Michigan
State Embalmers' and Funeral Di-
rectors' association now in convention
at the Arcadia in Detroit. His sub-
ject will be "Our Course in Embalm-
ing and Sanitary Science." In his talk
Dean Kraus expects to bring out the
aim'of the University in offering this
corse and to appeal to the associa-
tion for closer co-operation with the
University.
Because of the fact that the Univer-
sity has as severe entrance require-
ments for this course as for the Uni-
versity, there has not been an unusual-
ly large attendance during the past few
years. Dean Kraus will present the
matter in person in the hope of obtain-
ing more students for this course.
CHANUTE FIELD AVIATORS
DISSATISFIED AT TRANSFER
Rantoul, Ill., Aug. 11-There is much
dissatisfaction at Chanute field' over
an order today to send 339 men, al-
most the entire personnel, to Ross
field, near Los Angeles, Cal., for train-
ing at a balloon school. These men
enlisted with the promise that they
might remain at a post near their
homes and learn to fly. Many of them;
have already taken flying instructions
and some have reached the solo stage.
It is understood that only four men
will be retained at Chanute field. No
word has yet been received as to the
disposition of the officers. Informa-
tion from the war department is that
men are being taken from all the
northern flying fields to supply troops
for the Mexican border.

post for two years, and studying at the
Sorbonne and the College de France at
Leipzig. In 1908 he was made reader
in Assyriology ot Oxford, a position
corresponding to professor in Ameri-
can universities. here his work came
under the notice Dr. Sayce. The lat-
ter has been the acknowledged leader
in archaeology for the last fifty years.
He is the man who first gave to the
world definite information as to the
identity of the Hittittes, referred to in
the Scriptures but nowhere else in his-
tory until he translated ancient rec-
ords referring to them. He was also
the first to translate Cappadocian writ-
ing:
Another Appointment Expected
The announcement of Dr Langdon's
election to the professorship of As-
syriology is expected to be followed
by a still more important appointment.
For some time the scientific wold has
known that the British government
plans an exhaustive survey of all the
ancient lands wrested from the Turk,
chief among them Babylonia, the ter-
ritory between the Tigris and Euphra-
tes rivers.
Work of Expeditions
Although scores of expeditions have
been sent to the ruins of the more fam-
ous cities within the last 50 yeors, none
has done more than scratch the sur-
face. In 10 years of digging explorers
for the museum of the University of
Pennsylvania obtained 50,000 tablets,
half of which were retained by th.e
Turks, but did not even reach the
Temple proper, now known to be the
storehouse of inscriptions set up to the
gods by each succeeding conqueror.
Nippur, where the university explorers
worked, was the famed sacred city of
the ancients. It has been identified as
the Calneh of the Bible.
PROFS. RUGHARD AND NEWCOMBE
TO VISIT BIOLOGICAL STATION
Authority was given Prof. J. E.
Rughard of the zoological department
and Prof. T. C Newcombe of the bot-
any department at the recent meeting
of the Board of Regents to visit the
biological station at Lake Douglas be-
fore its close this summer for the
purpose of studying its location and
with a view to making suggestions as
to whether it would be advisable to
move the station to some other point
on the lake.
The present location was selected
when the station was started 11- years
ago. The belief exists, however, that
a more suitable location could be se-
cured, and that this better site would
afford better facilities for research and
study. Professors Rughard and New-
combe will probably leave the early
part of next week for Lake Douglas.
CHINESE BOYCOTT JAPANESE
. GOODS, DECLARES MINISTER
London, Aug. 11-Lou Tseng Tsiang
Chinese foreign minister, who has just
arrived in England, corroborated re-
ports of an extraordinary boycott of
Japanese goods throughout China, as
the result of the Japanese policy in
Shantung. He said:
"So far as I am aware, the boycott
is nlow general and the people are
refusing to handle Japanese goods of
any description. This state of af-
fairs exists among all classes and it
is naturally causing a good deal of
perturbation.
"I am hopeful, however, that my
own and the Japanese governments
will shortly come to some amicable
arrangement."
PROF. J. R. HAYDEN CHANGES

TOPIC OF TONIGHT'S LECTURE
Prof. J. R. Hayden of the Political
Science department, who is to lecture,
at 8. o'clock this evening in the Natural
Science auditorium, has changed his
topic to that of "The President, the
Senate, and the Treaty" from "Brit-
ish National Politics" about which he
was first to have talked.
Professor Hadyen is a prominent
political scientist and he has made a
special study of his subject. During
the war he was in command of one of
the 16-inch naval guns in France.

PRINCE OF WALES
REACHES AMERICA
St. Johns, N. F., Aug. 11.-The Brit-
ish battleship Renown, bearing the
prince of Wales to America, arrived
off Conception bay early today, escort-
ed by the cruisers Dauntless and Drag-
on. Preparations have been made for
the prince's reception here tomor-
row.
The government authorities have
planed a luncheon for the prince
and an automobile tour of the pic-
turesque country around St. John's.
He is to be the guest of honor at the
first regatta to be held on Quidi Vidi
lake since the war.
From Newfoundland he will go to
New Brunswick .and then proceed to
Canada, where a busy itinerary has
been prepared for his 10 weeks' stay.
It is expected that the prince will
return to Montreal from his tour of
Canada about October 27 and then
proceed to New York and Washington
on a brief visit.
REDS EFEAT KOICAK
DMSK COLLAPSE NEAR

Johin

CAPITAL
MENT

OF ANTI-RED
THREATENED
EVACUATION

Washington, Aug. 11.-Complete col-
lapse of the Kolchak movement in Si-
beria was forecast in reports reaching
Washington today. Kolchak forces
have fallen back almost 200 miles
from their former advanced lines and
Omsk was said to be threatened with
evacuation.
Failure of the allied and associated
governments to get adequate supplies
to Admiral Kolchak, the advices said,
had forced him to fall back steadily
before the greatly superior bolshevik
forces composed of veterans whose
officers include many Germans who
fled to Russia when the armistice was
signed.
Officials here are known to regard
Kolchak's efforts at an end unless
most radical measures are adopted by
outside governments and it was sug-
gested that the president might call
the attention of congress to the im-
minence of bolshevik control of all Si-
beria.
Military Problem
The proposition of extending aid to
Admiral Kolchak received the support
of President Wilson and his assistants
at the peace conference in Paris, but
the getting of supplies to him was
found to be more of a military. than a
diplomatic, problem. France, Eng-
land, and Japan were in position polit-
ically to offer supplies, but the posi-
tion of the United States was not so
clear on that point. Some officials
here held that for the United States to
participate in any extensive suppcrt.
either in supplying the forces or in
adding man rbower to the army, con-
gressional action would be necessary.
Yanks Far from Kolchak
The American force already in Sibe-
ria is far from the Kolchak-bolshevikl
lines. It was placed there for the an-
nounced specific purpose of guarding
of supplies at Vladivostok and the pro-
tection of the trans-Siberian railroad.
The status of the British force was
quite different, for the mission of that
army was to establish a line of com-
munication with. Admiral Kolchak's
army, making possible the use of
Archangel as a base of supplies. It
has failed. The stretch between Arch-
angel and Kolchak has increased until
it is now apparent little hope remains
of Kolchak recovering unless much
larger forces are sent to his support.
Military Problem
The supplies the French and British
have succeeded in getting through have
ben almost negligible, and Japan be-
cause of the distance and her loca-
tion has not been able to contribute
even a small part.
The probable withdrawal of the Brit-
ish volunteer forces before another
winter is construed officially here as
due to a desire of the governmeifm not
to add to the already serious disturb-
ance of political conditions at home.
ITALIAN LABOR COUNCIL WILL
MEET TO DISCUSS STRIKES
Rome, Aug. 11. - The national
council of the Italian Labor Federa-
tion will begin a special meeting at
Milan Aug. 15 to discuss the situation
created by the various strike move-
nients in Italy, according to the Avan-
ti; The meeting will last three days.

11. Bateman, '14E, Ap
To Assist New Faculty
Member

GOVERN.'
WITH

BLANCHARD TO GET
CHAIR. OF HIGHWAY
ENGINEERING HER[
REGENTS PICK COLUMBIA PROFES
SOR FOR NEWLY CREATED
POSITION
TO INSTALL HIGHWAY
TRANSPORT COURSI

Prof. Arthur Horace Blanchard
Columbia university has been chose
by the Regents to fill the newly trea
ed chair of highway engineering. Pr
fessor Blanchord will have charge o
the course in highway engineering fo
merly given by Prof. J. J. Cox and wi
also have supe~ision of a general e
pansion in this department.
John E. Batemen, '14E, who for th
past four years has been connecte
with the Michigan state highway con
mission has been oppointed to assi
Professor Blanchard. The undergrai
uate courses in highway engineerin
will be expanded and a course in hig
way transport will be established, t
latter being an entirely new one in th
University curricula. Professc
Blanchord will have charge of the r
quired courses in both subjects.
Professor Blanchard has been activ
in practical engineering work for mo
than 20 years. After graduating froi
Brown university in 1899, he served
consulting engineer to several con
struction companies, at the same tizr
holding a teaching position on ti
Brown faculty. In 1911 he becam
professor of highway engineering
Columbia, where he had taken his ma
ter's degree in 1902. Professor.Blanc
ard is the author of several text bool
and has contributed extensively to ti
field of engineering literature.
FRENCH LETTERS
DEVELOP IN WA]
That French literature has been d
veloped by the war and that furthi
development will be caused theret
was* the substance of the lectui
"French Letters and the War" give
Monday afternoon by Prof. Arthur
Canfield, head of the French depar
ment.
The speaker declared that t
French literature abounds in pictur
of heroism, of deep cmoral feeling, ar
of a responsibility to the sense
duty-all of which have been produ
ed by the effect of the war upon t
hearts of the French people. He sho
ed that the lower type of literatuni
was Parisian, not French, and th
this Parisian element is formed by t
demand of the cosmopolitan people Q
the world who go to Paris to se
their pleasure.
The Germans seized upon this tyi
as a basis for calling the French
decadent race, declared Profess<
Canfield, and they widely spread th
false doctrine. Fortunately the wor
is seeing that the bad is not repr
sentative of the French people, h
said.
According to the speaker thin
which may seem peculiar to America
are often commonplace to French pe
ple, and things which may seem of li
tle consequence to the Americans a
often considered by the French as ac
of depravity. He used this point I
show that the standards of the tv
nations are different.
Professor Canfield then traced t
development of French literature fo
'lowing the Franco-Prussian war, am
showed how the literature had ris
to greater heights after the defe
He said he expected even greater d
velopment after the late victory.
BRITISH COAL MINERS'
DEMANDS ARE REJECTE
London, Aug. 11.-The strike in t1
Yorkshire coal fields, involving 20(
000 miners, apparently will be fougi
to a finish. The coal controller ye
terday told the men's leaders it w
impossible to concede their demand
To do so, he said, would mean a stril
in every coal field in the country f<

similar concessions. No further coi
ferences have been arranged. It
said the strikers' funds will last on:
another fortnight .

A

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