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August 12, 1919 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-12

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THE WOLVERINE

[AT'S GOING ON
August 12
-The Duties of Sappers in
Prof. A. H. Lovell.
-The President, the Senate and
reaty, Prof. J. R. Hayden.
August 13
-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
y School of Music (Hill audi-
-The Political Situation in

ARTIST, SCOR ED BY WORLD
UNTIL HE WENT MAD, DIES
New York, Aug. 11.--Ralph Albert
Blakelock, 72, the painter whosege-
nius was not recognized until after
the impairment of his reason put an
end to his production, died Friday at
the Adirondack camp of William M.
Kingsley, where he had been taken a
month before by Mrs. Van Rensselaer
Adams, his guardian. His death was
due to arteriosclerosis.

(Illustrated), Dr. W. 3'. Rufus.

For many years he hawked his
paintings about New York, obtaining
for them never more than a few dol-
lars and undergoing the severest hard-

August 14
n.-North Africa under Roman
e (Illustrated), Prof. J. G. Win-
.-Miscellaneous readings. The
s in interpretative reading (Uni-,
ity hall).
August 15
n.-The All Year School, Mr.
1 C. Stetson, superintendent of
pls, Muskegon, Mich.
a.-How Fishes See, Hear, and
rn (Illustrated), Prof. J. E.
;hard.
TO DEPORT THOSE, WHO
IGNORE AMERICAN TONGUE
York, Aug. 11.-Deportation of
who do not speak English and
Till not avail themselves of the
unity to learn was the plan ad-
d today by the National Security
in. its "100 per cent American-
ampaign.

ships.
In 1899 his mind gave way under the
strain and he was taken to the asy-
lum. He reamined there continuously
for 17 years, during which his paint-
ings had been recognized at their true
value and he had been made a mem-
ber of the National Academy. and re-
ceived honorable mention at a Paris
exposition.
Among the most famous of the
Blakelock canvases are "Monlight,"
valued at $20,000 and owned by the
Toledo, O., Museum of Art; "Entrance
to the Forest," "Sunrise," "The Pipe
Dance," "Early Evening," "Indian
Encampment," "Wayfarers at Even-
tide," "Ruby Wine," ond "The Vision
of Life."
J. D. Cameron,'19, Working in Detroit
J. Duncan Cameron, '19, is now con-
necte.d with the William Windisch com-
pany, book binders, of Detroit.

U's So PROTESTS AGINST
MEXIAN AGRAIAN LAW
STATE DEPARTMENT FILED RE-
PEATED$ COMPLAINTS, SAYS
WILSON
Washington, Aug. 11. - Repeated
protests against the Agrarian law of
the Mexican state of Sonora which is
regarde as inimical to American inter-
ests have been rpade to the Mexican
government by the state department,
the senate was informed today by
President Wilson.
The president wrote in reply to a
senate resolution and transmitted a
report from )the state department. This
said that when the Sonora legislature
was considering the law last Decem-
ber, the American embassy was di-
rected to object and again last month
the protest was made. The law now
is being studied by the state depart-
ment experts with a view to further
action by the American government.
Ef Paso, Texas, Aug. 11.-Fifteen
leaders of the conspiracy to cause a
munity in Chihuahua City federal gar-
rison whose task was to deliver the
city to General Francisco Villa were
executed following the discovery of
the plot, according to an American
.who arrived here today from Mexico.
He said the identity of the men exe-
cuted was unknown when he left.
Mexico City, Aug. 11. - A proposed
land law carrying, it is said, provi-
sions of vital importance to large
landholders and those desiringto se-
cure small parcels for individual cul-
tivation, has been submitted by the d-
partment of development to President
Carranza for consideration and sub-
mission to congress. The bill is said
to comprise regulations for the ac-
quisition not only of what are pri-
marily national lands but those hold-
ings which have been confiscated or
held temporarily by the government
since the Madero revolution.
NON-ARRIVAL OF MATERIALS
DELAYS UNION CONSTRUCTION
Delays in the completion of the
Union has been caused by the failure
of the contractor's materials to arrive
because of the railroad situation. The
principal material which has not come
is the flooring.
Early in the summer it was thought
that it would be possible to finish the
Union in time for the opening of the
fall term, but Union officials say that
this is now impossible. Everything
possible will be done, however, to
hasten the construction, and many
parts of the building will be ready for
student use. Much of the furniture has
been ordered and will be in place by
the opening of school.

G. 0. P. BOOMS T. R., JR., FOR
N. Y. LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR
New York, Aug. 11.-Having nomin-
ated Lieut. Col. Theodore Roosevelt
for assemblyman, but convinced he will
have gained enough political experi-
ence during one session at Albany,
Nassau county Republicans already are
booming him for lieutenant governor.
At a clambake at Oyster Bay Satur-
day Roosevelt shared honors with Sec-
retary of State Hugo, who made no
secret of his purpose to try for the
Republican gubernatorial nomination
next year. The suggestion was made
that Roosevelt run on the same ticket
with him for lieutenant governor.

AMIR OF AFGHANISTAN LOSES 1
BIG SUBSIDY BY TREATY
Smila, India, Aug. 11.-The Amir of
Afghanistan, under the peace treaty
signed with Great Britain last week,
not only loses his annual subsidy of
$600,000, but more than $5,000,000 in
subsidy which it appears he had on
deposit with the government of In-
dia. Confiscation of these arrears is
a hard blow for Habibullah.
REGISTRAR HALL RETURNS
FROM MONTH'S VACATION
Dr. A. G. Hall, registrar of the Uni-
versity, returned Sunday from a vaca-

tion of a month spent at Coryell,
Mich., in the Cheneaux islands. He
has resumed his duties in preparation
for the fall semester.
DR. W. C. RUFUS TO LECTURE
ON SITUA TION IN KORE A
Dr. W. C. Rufus, now a member of
the astronomy faculty and formerly for
some years a missionary ip Korea, will
lecture at 5 o'clock Wedensday after-
noon in the Natural Science audito-
rium on "The Political Situation in
Korea." Dr. Rufus will use slides in
conection with this lecture.
Read The Wolverine for Camps
news.

news.

gel t ti 5'.5 4 .6}.

Your

PICNICS AND OUTINGS

0

will be

More Enjoyable

if you have a

PORTABLE VICTROLA

' j1

t

NIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

for your
Canoe or Motor
Visit our New Victrola and Record Department.
Five sound- proof booths insure your correct
judging of the merits of a machine or record.
Let us demonstrate.
Mrs. A. A. Roost
Wtitauia ub l maynara
- Ah r

Regular Session 1919-1920 begins September 30
For information address the Dean or Secretary
of that School or College of the University in

N

which -you are interested, or

I

SHIRLEY W. SMITH,
Secretary of the University

wr.

[Ii. *1 ~ I

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