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July 17, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-17

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V Ar a'

I N L

oivertnce

OFFICIAL. STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION
OF THE UNIVERSITY O MICHIGAN
Published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday afternoons
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second-class matter
Subscription by carrier ortimail, $.oo
- Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street
Phones: Business-96o; Editorial-2414
Hours: Managing Editor-i:oo to 2:oo o'clock daily except Saturday; Business
Manager-i:oo to 2:oo o'clock daily except Saturday
nunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
rint, but as an evidence of faith, and noticesof events will be published in The
eat the'discretipn of the Editor, if left at or mailed to the office.
gned communications will receive no consideration. No manuscript wll be returned
e writer incloses postage.
Wolverine does not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed in the communications.
Mark K. Ehbert.....................Managing Editor
t Phone 2414
J. Ellsworth Robinson..................Business Manager
Phone 96 or isos
Z Campbell...........City Editor Howard Weeks............Column Editor
arx....... .Associate Editor Chas. R. Osius Jr.........Directory Editor
Martha Guernsey..........Women's Editor
Mark B. Covell............Assistant Business Manager
Thornton W. Sargent Jr.................Issue Editor
REPORTERS
. G. Merz J. E.Beretta Robert W. Taylor
Samuel Iamport
BUSINESS STAFF
neider George H. Heideman Richard Lambrecht
James C. Coston William Wachs
THURSDAY, JULY 17, 1919
WHY CLOSE THE COURTS? .
are the tennis courts closed after 6 o'clock in the evening, and
Sundays? At just the time of day when the heat has abated, when
of the evening is beginning to be enjoyed, and many devotees of
ould care most for a game, the courts are denied them. And on
a day of leisure, the courts are closed.
31y no harm would result from keeping the courts open an hour
.onger in the evenings. And a great deal of pleasure would be de-
om such an action. There is little enough to do in the way of rec-
&uring the Summer session; and tennis, being one of the most
diversions, should be allowed to be enjoyed to the fullest extent.
rooms and other sources of amusement are available the greater
the day, .tennis, which is assuredly of greater benefit, should ba
d at least as long as daylight lasts.
clay tennis is also against the rules. 'But why? There is nothing
In exercise, and those who play tennis do so mainly to improve
iscles. And if picture theaters are open on the Sabbath, there is
)n why tennis. should be regarded as more harmful. Sunday ca-
s not frowned upon; yet tennis is. Why?
ARTISTS ;ALL
is doing things for the sake of doing them, and not for the hope
eward. A painter who paints pictures merely to make a living,
- who writes just to. make money, is not an artist. But if the
paints because he wishes to leave something permanent to the
omething beautiful, some great idea or feeling, then he is a real
And so is the writer who writes of life in order that other people
re a better idea of it, may understand it better, may themselves
etter for having read his work.
a at the University we are preparing for our life 'work. We are
.ying for the sake of studying, nor working for the sake 'of the
.or is this to be expected. Our studies are the foundations upon
e 'hope to build the future of a useful life. Later, when the foun-
are secure, and we have begun to be a part of the outside world,
can turn to art, and be the real artists for which our studies have
I us.
art is not confined to painting, or writing; or sculpture or music
of what we call the fine arts. There is art in everything. The
who paints for the sake of painting, the writer who writes for the
e of writing, are not more the artists than anyone who does things
ake of doing them. Living a life of service, with no other hope of
han the self-satisfaction of knowing that good has been done -
ks the artist as surely as though his name were shouted from the

On the Other Hand
JOS. CANTELOUP
FRUIT MERCHANT
ESCAPES BOMB
-Headline.
There's nothing funny that could be
said about this one. ,
There was once a young student of
law,
Who could only believe what he saw.
The prof. said, "You will flunk,"
He replied, "That's all bunk,"
He is now wielding hammer and saw.
-N. D. I.
He-Did you read about the bird
who was paving the street and got
arrested?"
She-"No, let's have it."
He-"They caught him knocking the
tar out of his broom."
'Jever leave an Ec class
after
talking about gold dollars
and
handling checks and drafts for thous-
ands
figuring up millions
in bank clearings
and
doing problems that begin
"if A had $900,243,678-"
then
go down to your hash house
and feed heavy
and then
put the paw in the vest
and find
a nickel, a dime and three pennies?'
FIGHT ON NEAR
BEER DEFEATED
-Headline.'
How can anybody get to fight onj
near beer?
'Jever hear of a palindrome? It's
a word or combination of words that
reads the same baciwards or for-
wards. Here are some specimens:
"Deed; boob, Hannah," and they say
the longest single palindrome in the
language Is the word "rotator." Some
sentences:
"Madam, I'm Adam." This is said
to be the remark of the first man
when he encountered Eve.
Sign in a drugstore window: "Red
root put up to order.
What Napoleon said: "Able was I
ere I saw Elba."
Well, Well!
Poor Willie Ding
Is gone for all
He fell in the spring
And was killed in the fall.
The College Graduate
He found in after years little use
for most of the things that he had
studied in college. Latin, Greek,
Mathematics, Language, Political
Economy, History, Psychology had
long since been forgotten.' In fact
the only subject that had repaid his
long nights of study was geology.
-He found his geologist's hammer
the ideal thing for soothing his wife.
-Clipped.

that or he has heard the rumor that
he is going to be tried in London.
In the Deserted Village?
Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Spink spent Sun-
day with Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Gold-
smith. -A. A. T. N.
How They Pass the Long Summer
Evenings in Pinckney
Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Smith,
Mrs. Robert Jack and Miss Julia Ball
attended the meetin of the Eastern
Star chapter at Pinckney Friday even-
ing. Miss Ball gave a reading, "The
Auto and the Mule."
-Hamburg News Item.
THREE KILLED, TWO HURT WHEN
U. S. NAVAL PLANE CRASHES
Philadelphia, Pa., July 16.-Three
men were killed when a seaplane
plunged into the back channel at
the navy yard Monday. The dead
are Ensign Roerick, Chief Machinist's
Mte Erkle, and Coxswain H. G. Son-
der. Two others were injured.
The plane, of the Canadian F-5-L
type, was up testing radio telephones.
When about 200 feet above the chan-
nel it suddenly plunged down into the
water. The cause of the accident is
not yet determined.
$25,000,000 NEEDED IN 1919
TO ASSIST CRIPPLED HEROES
Washington, July 16-Appropriations
of at least $25,000,000 will be needed
this year for rehabilitating and educat-
ing wounded soldiers, sailors, and ma-
rines, the house appropriations com-
mittee has been told by James P.
Munroe, vice chairman of the federal
board for vocational education.
Brig. Gen. 'Henry E. Noyes Dies
Berkeley, ,Cal., July 16.-Brig. Gen.
Henry E. Noyes, U. S. A., retired, died
Sunday, aged 80 years.
General Noyes; who was appointed
to West Point from Maine, served
through the Civil war and in many
Indian campaigns, and the Spanish-
American war. He served for a time
as governor general of the province
of Santa Clara, Cuba.
U. S. Envoy to Japan Leaves for Omsk
Tokio, July 16.-Roland S. Morris,
United States ambassador to Japan,
has left Tokio for Omsk, for the seat
of the All-Russian government. Am-
bassador Morris undertakes to jour-
ney under instructions from Wash-
ington to make a report on conditions
at Omsk.
Red Literature Found on Cubans
Cadiz, Spain, July 14.-Seven Span-
iards, expelled from Cuba because of
their alleged - activities during the
recent strikes there, were arrested re-
cently on arrival from Havana. Bol-
shevik literature was found in the
men's possession.
Karolyi May Be Hungarian President
Vienna, July 16.-One of the solu-
tions suggested for a way out of the
present political situation in Hungary
is that Count Michael Karolyi again
assume the presidency which he sur-
rendered to the Communists several
months ago.
24 Students Attending Biooglcal Camp
Twenty-four students of the Sum-
mer session are taking work at the
biological station on Douglas Lake in
the northern part of the state. The
study at the camp consists principally
of field work in botany and zoology.

SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS
We offer quantities of New and Second Hand

TEXT BOOKS

for all departments. Our
BOOKS, FOUNTAIN

stock of LOOSE LEAF NOTE
PENS, Etc., Etc., 'is complete.

A Cordial Welcome and Unusual Service at
Wahr's University Bookstores

-

f
i

U:

For Traveling. Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.

ASK US

Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S.State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

I

-I

-

E

Go to LYNDON'S 719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Eastman Kodaks Eastman Films
GUARANTEED AMATEUR FINISHING
ENLARGEMENTS FROM YOUR NEGATIVES A SPECIALTY
We have led in amateur finishing for twelve years and are still lead-
ing:-Why? Because we give you QUALITY. We guarantee our devel-
oping or no charge. We have the latest and best equipped store in the
State and our help is experienced in every line of Photography.
IF YOU WANT SATISFACTION BRING YOUR FILMS TO

"wo Doors from
Hill Auditorium

LYNDON & COMPANY

7U North II
University Avenue

l r '
. . ..e.- --

77

,I'

LEAVE YOUR FILMS
AT
QUARRY'S DRUG STORE

I

FOR

THE SWAINS
TO DEVELOP AND PRINT

SCHAEBERLE & SON, Music House
110 SO. MAIN ST.
Complete line of High Grade Pianos, Player
Pianos, Victrolas, Victor Records
All String and Wmind
Instruments
SEE US FOR YOUR MUSICAL WANTS

nay not all be artists in the larger sense. .But we may all be of
a our fellow-men, we may do things just for the sake of doing
ause it is a delight in itself. Living itself is an art, and we may
ists if we try.
. ,1
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE LIBRARY
many of the students who are taking summer work ,are availing
s of the opportunities offered by the University library? Mich-
rary is one of the largest and finest \of any university, and ranks
country's best in the number and diversity of books it contains.
ter number of students do not seem to realize that the entire
at their disposal, and that the benefit and value possible from its
most incalculable.
ation is a matter of broadening the mind, but not in any one
to the exclusion of others. To the specialist, the library is indis-
But it is equally invaluable to those who wish to broaden their
3 and increase the scope of their culture. The library is not only
to look up references and do the required reading; it should be
I a refuge and an opportunity.
a refuge whenever one needs it as such. If a reaction is desired
routi.ne and monotony of serious work, go to the library and read
ain or Stephen Leacock or Dumas or Conan Doyle or anybody that
your mind off your work forla time. They are all to be found in the
)r if the opposite reaction is needed, the reaction away from the
ings, try Poe, or Browning, or John Stuart Mill, or Plato.
. opportunity for education, the library is unexcelled. There are
s of great men to be read, histories, encyclopedias, philosophies,
art -- everything possible for the furtherance of culture. And
zines also must not be overlooked. Practically every periodical
portance finds its way to the library, and this vast fund of informa-
:nowledge is to be had for the asking.
versity education is an advantage enjoyed only by, a small per-
f the population. The University library is an essential to this
and the privilege of using it an advantage the greatness of which
s do not appreciate.

Lines to a Chubbite
I see her every bloomin' day,
And gosh, I'd like to meet her,
But all she does is go her way
And I lack nerve to greet her.
-AL. K. LIE.
The most undesirable neighborhood
for a woman to be in during the sum-
mer months is the neighborhood of
250 pounds.
A certain youngstudent of means,
Decided to fly' with some queens,,
They soon spent all his bones,
Ere he learned they were drones,
And' now he is living on beans.
-N. D. I.
President Pessoa of Brazil is mak-
ing a tour of the United States. My,
doesn't it seem peculiar to have a
president in the country.
A department store advertises, "The
two most favored types in ladies'
bathing suits." We suppose they are
the same as ours, blond and brunette.
The Quip Engineering
Yes, we have a drag with the in-
structors. They drag us out about
four miles in the woods every morn-
ing.
-The Black Fly."
JACK PERSHING
LEADS PARADE,
-A. A. Times-News.
The bird who wrote this has never
been in the army or he wouldn't get
familiar with a general that way.
A news item says that the recent
bad weather has been responsible for

Read the Wolverine
News.

for Campus

Bathing Suits
WE HAVE THE TWO PIECE KIND WITH
THE WHITE BELT
GEO. J. MOE, "Sport Shop"

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:xo a.
in., and hourly to 8: to p.:in.
Jackson Limited and Express 'Cars-7:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (F,x.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. n., 9:os a.
in. and every two hours to 9:os p. m., r:50
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:45P. in.,12:20
a. mn., r :to a. m.., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. n. and
11:20 p. in.
Ua

lid =Sum m er
Sale
All Light
Three-piece Suits
14_Off
N. F. ALLEN CO.
The douse of Kuppenhelmer in AnnArbor

Abot
The Coolest Piece in Town
Air Changed Once a Minute
ICE CREAM and HOME
MADE CANDIES
The Sugar Bowl
Phone 967 109 SO. STATE
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann:Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $560,000.00
Resourees .. ....$4,000,000.00

/

has come into nearly a million dollars a year says he is
t his enlistment. The navy is certainly teaching him how

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