100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 17, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

e of the best opportunities yet
led Constance Talmadge for the
ay of her talents, is the role of
dine Barker in "The Veiled Ad-
re" which will betpresented at
Arcade today and tomorrow. -A
iful thread of romance runs
gh the picture; and romance, it
t be said, is Constance Tal-
e's "long suit." Her many ad-
's can be assured of a rare treat
they view her work in this pic-
She is full of her customary'
and pep and her vivacious per-
ity is given freerrein. Geraldine
sr is a young and beautiful so-
girl, whose marriage to Reginald'
ker, a society "fop" is averted.
occurs w.hen she, in trying to
Richard Annesly, a young man
Texas, a lesson as to the in-
ce of woman over man, is her-
enlightened regarding men and
nsciously teaches herself a vital
n of life.

u~U UI L11IUI lIUul 11u Y1
. SSCOL-NP
(Continued from Page One)
power, some say autocratic . This,
being the case, our American democ-
racy is frequently if not usually auto-
cratic in practice The schools then
which are really a part of our society
cannot hope to advance safely and
wisely if the progress is greatly in
advance of the experience of that
society
Again, our democracy is not ab-
solute ' in that the. common citizens
have very little to say about certain
things in which they are considerably
interested, mainly in a commercial
way. We are indebted to Dean Bal-
liet for the reminder that there is in
this country an autocracy of irre-
sponsible powers. A few gentlemen
in Chicago absolutely control the
prices of meats in every city of the
country. A few others fin New York
likewise fix the prices of coal for the
different localities.
Attacks on Supervision
A study of the complaints against
autocratic control of the schools
shows, in my opinion, that except for
negligible fault-finding, the bulk of
the criticism is in reality complaints
against supervision and that largely
of the faulty kind. Such faults are
in the person of the supervisor and
not necessary to supervision.
President Owen of the Chicago
Normal school says, "The professional
life of a teacher should not be gov-
erned by thie mere personal opinion
of a superintendent. There must be
some way of reighing his judgment
so that it can be accepted. And I

should add that the success of a sup-
ervisor or superintendent should not
be determined by the mere personal
opinion of a teacher or group of teach-
ers. There must be some way of
weighing their judgment so that it
can be accepted. All this is a plea
for scientific measurement.
Councils Helpful
Co-operation should be the word
and not democracy, and the wise sup-
erintendent will capitalize the talent
of his force and use it to the limit.
He will, meet this public clamor for
dempcracy by initiating the forma-
tion of councils of the teachers whose
business will be to aid him along the
lines of their desires and abilities.'
The results of councils among the
teachers are at least three; first, to
broaden and educate the teachers in
school administration and school
policies; second, to make them real-
ize the impracticability of some of
their unofficial ideas; third, to con-
siderably increase the sources of con-
structive planning.
In such councils the superintend-
ent and teachers meet on common
ground occupied by representatives
of all groups. Some councils should
have their meetings without the pres-
ence of any executive. The super-
intendent should use his teachers in
the formation of policies and when
he 's voluntarily governed by their
suggestions we shall have one ex-
ample of government by the consent
of the governed.
Personality and personal fitness for
the job are still the main points and
of even greater importance than the
system employed. Any method that
will improve one's personality or per-
sonal fitness will be the best. I be-
lieve that method to be co-operation.
Prevalent Evils
But if we are not to adopt thought-
lessly a popular slogan and practice,
of what importance is this hint for
practicing democracy in school ad-
ministration and how shall we con-
duct ourselves? The American teach-
er has been treated wrongly. As a
group, she has been poorly paid and
poorly respected. She has sometimes
been depri'ved of initiative, poorly
supervised, and not visited or super-
vised enough. And all these things,
must be corrected. If those who have
the responsibility for school policies
do not make the corrections, then the
teachers or the public are likely to
do so.
The superintendent should use the
talents of his associates and share
his responsibilities with them but he
he should do this voluntarily. I be-
lieve the best teachers prefer only

XRROW
OY TAILORED
OFTCOLLARS
IT WELL-WASH EASILY
MeUt, Peabody 8- qC., Inc., Troy, N. Y.
N

occasional consultations and wish the
executive to be a leader rather than
a servant of them.
It will be noted that the superin-
tendent who carries out to the ex-
treme his ideas of self-government
among the teachers does not in this
way free himself from any of his re-
sponsibilities. And it is a matter of
course that he will reserve to him-
self the right to take the privilege of
self-direction from any member of
his force whom he considers un-
worthy.
But what shall we say of the re-
mark that "slaves cannot teach free
men democracy?" Merely this: teach-
ers who demand control of thesschools
do not understand democracy as it
has been explained in the foregoing.
Those who do understand it and un-
derstand also co-operation and are
actuated by the spirit of service will
know how to train children to take
only their proper share of control and
then to exercise that share effectively.
Democracy's Faults
Some of the unprofitable and im-
proper things under the guise of de-
mocracy may here be nted: clamor
against supervision; habitual fault-
finding; trying to secure recognition
by stampede methods; tendency to-
ward unionism and the less admirable
practices of unionism; too easy ap-
proach to the superintendent of the
sort that always allows the principal
to be ignored and his authority un-
dermined; any understanding that the
superintendent alone or the body of
teachersalone may veto the action of
the other.
The teachers should not have power
to veto the action of the superintend-
ent, but on the other hand no wise
superintendent would ever find It
necessary to ignore the wishes of all
his teachers.
Methods of Control
There are many practical ways of
giving teachers a proper and profi-
table share in the conduct of school
affairs, but first of all a protetorate
must beestablished. The superintend-
ent must give his attention to estab-
lishing system, and after this he may
occupy himself with determining the
talents of his force and with a division
of responsibility as well as labor, re-
membering that the best kind of
teachers' council exists to advise the
superintendent and should be invited
to do so.
Further steps follow: appointing
committees to make a course of study;
to select and design furniture and
equipment; to draft requirements gov-
erning allowances of pay during i1-
ness; to study and make recommenda-
tions concerning a twelve months'
school, especially regarding the ad-
justment of salary to the ten and
twelve-month plans; to draft report
forms and to arrange for publicity in
any phase of the school activities; to
control the school library and another
to determine the selection of desirable
objects of art; allowing credit to
teachers for practical suggestions for
bettering the schools; forming a
council1of teachers with representa-
tion on the senate, (the body of ad-
visors to the executive); a teachers'
association; inviting individuals and
committees to appear before the board
of education.
PENNSYLVANIA PROFESSOR
. SHOOTS AND KILLS BURGLAR

Regular Boarders and Transients
$5.50, $6.50 and $7.00 per Ileek
Lunches 40C Dinners hoc
Sunday Dinners 75c
One Block North from Hill Auditorium

I'

I

1

AL..

Po

Fines
Readc
Dusti
Excu
Put-in-Ba
on the mag
capacity 3,2

t tI i
r oo Lake Erie's
a Resorts are
zed via Ashley
'n Steamer Line
irsions Every Day
y-Cedar Point reached-every day
nificent steel steamer Put-in-Bay,
00 people.

SFreeman'

A

8-9 E. Washington

Big Hotel Victory now open at Put-in-Bay.
Hotel Breakers and the world's greatest bathing beach at Cedar Point.
Excursions every day to Put-in-Bay. To Ohio Points via A & D Line and
Fare rond-trip week days - $ .80 connecting trolley-lines reduce.
Fare round-trip Sundays and Holidays 1.10 fare one-half.
Five hours on the boat. Leaving Detroit at 9:00 a. m., returning at 8:-00p. m.
Cedar Point Excursions on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.
Steamer Frank E. Kirby leaving Detroit at 8 a. m., returning at 11:50 p. m.
Five hours at Cedar Point. Fare round Trip $100. On Steamer Put-in-
Bay Friday and Sunday $1.35 round trip.

JEST IC
ESTRA Nightly-All Shows Sunday
16-17-Dorothy Dalton in
iled," and "Welcome Little
Sennett Comedy.
9-"Choosing a Wife." An
Cast. "The Amateur Liar,"
edy.

Finsel's music for dancin
on SteamerPut-in-Bay. Bal
room, largest on lake steam-
ers. No charge for dancing.
IlaU

Ashley & DustiniSteasrer Line
First Street Wharf DetroitMich.
Write For Our Map Shoff
_ Lake Erie Pwrts

CORONA
LC. Smith
Remington
Underwood
Hammond and
other makes of typewriters
bought, sold, rented, exchanged,
cleaned, repaired.

wl

/

Y * -

RCA D E
Shows at 3:oo; 7:00; 8:30
Phones:
tre, 296-M Mgr's Res., 2316-M
- Fri-17- 18-Constance T lmadge in
he Veiled Adventure;" Christie Corn-
y, "When Bobby Comes Marching
me" and Ford Weekly. 25c. ing
-19-Hale Hamilton in "Full of
ep;" "You Know Me A" Comedy,
d Outing Chester Scenic.A
Mon-20-2 1-Madge Kennedy in "The
ong Door" and "Smiling Bill" Par-
ns in "Circumstantial Evidence."

TYPEWRITING and
MIMEOGRAPHING
A Specialty

fi'

w ,

UA

o. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE

I

I

WUERTH THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
burs-Fri - 17-18 - Mitchell Lewis in
"Nine-tenths of the Law" and a two-
reel L-Ko Comedy.
t-19-Billie Rhodes in "In Search of
Arcadia" with a News andnComedy.
an-Mon-20-21-MARY MILES MIN-
TERS in "THE BACHELOR'S WIFE"
with a SUNSHINE COMEDY, "SON
OF A GUN." Admission 25c, tax in-
cluded.
es -Wed-22-23-"One Woman," a six
reel special, with a Lloyd Comedy and
Kinogram Weekly.

' ,

GRUEN WATCHES
SILVERWARE CUT GLASS
LEATHER GOODS
ALARM CLOCKS FOUNTAIN PENS
FINE JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIRING
HALLE Q FVL L E R
STATE STREET JEWELERS

TODAY and TOMORROW
CONSTANCE TALMADGE
-in
"THE VEILED ADVENTURl

Leave Copy
At
Quarry's and,
' Th Delta

I

Assi
ADVERTI'

L 1

Leave Copy
at
Quarry's and
The Delta

By day she was a m
curist-at night she wa
society girl, the daughte
one of the best families in
City.
He said no woman cc
get him to elope with
She made him change
mind! Want to know'
she did itu? r
See this picture.

I

ORPHEUM THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00,
T ,urs-Fri-17-18-Charlotte Walker in
"MEN" with a News and Comedy.
Sat-19-Shirley Mason in "Good-bye
Bill" with a Scenic and Comedy (Ret.).
Sun-Mon-20-21-June Elvidge in "The
Love Defender"with a Mutt & Jeff
Cartoon Comedy, "Look Pleasant
Please" and Ford Weekly.
Tues-Wed-22-23--Albert Ray in "Be a
Little Sport" with "THE SILENT
MYSTERY," Episode No. 10.
Thurs-Fri-24-25--A Griffith production,
"The Girl Who Staid at Home" with a
News and Comedy (Ret.).
Sat-26-Pauline Frederick in "Daughter
of the Old South" (Ret.) with a
Scenic and Comedy.

LOST
LOST-Let the Wolverine help find
that lost article.
LOST - Gold Eversharp pencil on
State street. Liberal reward. Box
B, Wolverine.
Patronize our advertisers.
Read the Wolverine for Campps
News.

WANTED
WANTED-Girlo for domestic work in
pantries, nurses dining rooms, and
as maids. Reside in New Employees'
Home with matron in charge. Ad-
dress the Grace Hospital, John R.
St. & Wilis Ave., Detroit, Michigan.
WANTED-A good pianist can make
some Summer school money by call-
ing Mr. Yeager between 5:30 and
6:30 immediately. Wuerth Theater.

Philadelphia, July 16. - A masked
burglar was shot and killed by Prof.
Benjamin Franklin Shappelle, head of
the department of romance languages
of the Summer school of the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, in the Alpha Chi
Rho fraternity house Monday. The
burglar, who was about 28 years old,
had threatened death to Professor
Shappelle and others in the building.
Receiving a bullet below the heart, the
burglar leaped from a second floor
window, reeled across the street, and
died as two policemen reached him.
Watch for the Student Directory.

I CONSTANCE TAL

Also Christie Comedy, "When Bobby Comes
Home"-Adults 25c, Children 1Oc

M

I-T,

i1

COMING - SUNDAY AND MONDAY
Madge Kennedy in "Through the Wrong Doc
The Story of An Accidental Honeymoon

b
/

w.

-.

I

$.75

r7

SvBSCRIBE FOR

N'OW

A 35c SUMMER SCHOOL DIRECTORY FREE
WITH EACH SUBSCRIPTION

NEWS OF THE CAMPVS, CITY, AND WORLD

SUBSCRIBE AT WOLVERINE OFFICE

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan