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July 15, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE THEATERS
AT THE ARCADE

THE WOLVERINE
educations of College lien Should ie 1road And
Human Rather Than Too Highly Specialized And
Narrow, Is 'Belief Of Dean Mortimer E. Cooley

I

"The Way of the Strong" will be
shown at the Arcade today only.
This features Anna Q. Nilssen, and is
a splendid attraction from every point
of view. Because the star is not well
known, the management at first re-
fused to book the picture, but later
saw it in Detroit and at once booked
the production, and recommends it
most highly. The first scenes are laid
in Alaska, but are later changed to the
East, where a new angle of the "eter-
nal triangle" is worked out in a most
entertaining and interesting manner.
Nazimova in "The Red Lantern" has
been rebooked and will be shown at'
the Arcade tomorrow. This is for the
benefit of those who were unable to
see it when fit was first presented at
the Arcade.

(Editor's Note: The Wolverine prints
today the concluding article on edu-
cational problems by Dean Mortimer
E. Cooley. Dr. Cooley says that the
way to avoid the weakness which
ruined the German war machine is toE
make the educations of college men
broad and human, rather than so high-
ly specialized that they know one sub-
ject perfectly and little else.)
Our entire material world, so far as
social structure is concerned, can be
very justly credited to the engineer.
Our great buildings, our transit lines,
our industrial plants, our national and
international communications by wire,
wireless, mail, steamship, and the dis-
tribution of our wares, all oweitheir
origin and comparative perfection to
the engineer.
And yet there is one phase of the
engineering profession which is little
understood-even by men of the call-
ing-which is of even broader value to
the nation than that of material ad-
vancement. This is the relation of the
engineer, in the different branches of
his science, to the worker-the hewer
of wood, the forger of iron, the carter
of stone-who typifies the constructive
half of our civilization known as
"Labor" and his equal and important
intimacy with the other, the provision-
ing and directing half, usually termed
"Capital."
If we are to solve the tense problems
which have arisen through the last
few years of bloodshed, misery and
spreading dissatisfaction with certain
of our living conditions, no saner,
surer mediator can be found between
the classes than the man who proves
to both "upper" and "lower" strata
his sincerity, working ability and right
to adequate reward-the engineer.

Whatever in the luxuriously furn-
ishied offices of the capitalist, or in
the mine, the railroad cut, the grimy
factory or surrounded by the whirring7
wheels of America's multiplex indus-
trial machines, the engineer represents4
the trained intellect, the sinewy hand
combining the labor of brawn and,
brain, and the executive genius who
brings the blue-print to material frui-
tion.
The ditch digger, the factory hand,t
the laborer on the lowest rung of thet
industrial ladder recognizes the crea-
tive work of the engineer. He sees3
concrete evidence of mental and spirit-x
ual power as great enterprises takeE
shape, as Nature is conquered in the
most obstinate forms, by sheer mental-
ity and grim determination.

As to state and national problems
we need more engineering skill in the
direction of executive matters. Law-
yers seem to predominate in nearly all
,lines of general public life; yet, there
are questions of international import-
ance in every branch of Government
work which need administration by
scientifically trained minds.
The lack of engineering experts is
due as much to the unwillingness of
the engineer to enter political life as
to the public, in not urging him to
do so. Engineers do not like politics;
yet, politics-in government-are
necessary to every phase of modern
society and industry. How many en-
gineers are there in Congress, in Cab-
inet positions-even in public service
commissions? In labor boards and
boards of trade?

, j
Lake Erie's
st Resorts are
bed via Ashley&
in Steamer Line g
ursions Every Day
ay-Cedar Point reached every day
gniflcent steel steamer Put-in-Bay,
,200 people.

Fine
Reac
Dust

Exc

Put-in-B
on the ma
capacity 3

A.R R OW
TkRgO TA IL O ED
SOFT COLL ARS
FIT WELL-WASH EASILY
Cluett, Peabody8f Co., Inc., Troy, N. Y.
MAJESTIC
MAJESTIC ORCHESTRA ightly-All Shows Sunday
Sun-Mon-Tus - 13-14-15 - "Yankee
Doodle in Berlin." A six reel Sennett
Comedy, featuring Ben Turpin, Marie
Prevost, Ford Sterling,nand Six of the
Original Sennett Bathing Girls in per-
son.
Wed-Thurs-16-17-Dorothy Dalton in'
"Hard Boiled," and "Welcome Little
Stranger," Sennett Comedy.
ARCADE
Shows at 3.00; 7:00; 8:30
Phones:
Theatre, 296-M Mgr's Res., a316-M
Tues-15-Anna Q. Nilsson in "The Way
of the Strong;" Star Comedy, "All in
the Swim" and News Weekly.
Wed-16--Iiazimova in "The Red Lan-
tern" (Ret.); Star Comedy and News
Weekly.
Thurs-Fri-17-18-Constance Talmadge in
"The Veiled Adventure;" Christie Com-
edy, "When Bobby Comes Marching
Home" and Ford, Weekly. 25c.

To even the simplest of the labor
forces the engineer, many times work-
ing with theim unshaven, unshorn,
wearing muddy overalls, speaking in
the patios of the workers while wield-
ing his magic pen and pencil with the
wizardy of the laboratory and the
class room, represents a higher force
than the wage earner, power which
justly deserves infinitely greater re-
ward.
The engineer is to the working man
who materializes his blue-prints and
obeys his personal directions the sym-
bol of science; of intellect, of educa-
tion and of that "teamwork" which is
the keynote of modern achievement,
In his tasks and his ability he is one
of the most powerful rebuttals of Bol-
shevism and industrial unrest.
To the employer and the capitalist
whose profits depend upon his accur-
acy and energy, the engineer is the
governing factor of business success
in production. His creative vision,
growing from his scientific training,
and brought to fruition by the virility
of his practical executive ability, is
the foundation of modern achievement
in a thousand ways.
In short, the engineer should enter
public life, giving his talents and tech-
nical skill for the good of his neigh-
bors. Local engineering societies in
the various towns and cities should co-
operate with their neighbors and with
municipal authorities not only in tech-
nical problems, but in social and in-
dustrial, as well, because of their un-
usual knowledge of and acquaintance
with people of all classes. Their abil-
ity as mediators of labor problems,
their scientific knowledge of the de-,
tails of public matters should be given
without charge for the general good.

I

It

CORONA
L. C. Smith
Remington
Underwood
Hammond and
other makes of typewriters
bought, sold, rented, exchanged,
cleaned, repaired.

TYPEWRITING and
MIMEOGRAPHING
A Specialty

A great practical asset of American
life is being wasted by the loss of en-
gineering brains and training in the
evryday problems of life. This means
sacrifice on the part of the big-spirit-
ed engineer who devotes more or less
of his time and energy to financially
unprofitable public work. But this
is a big period of world history and
all of us must make sacrifices, as, in-
deed, most of us have, that we may
perfect our civilization and perpetu-
ate our national ideals against the
ominous attacks of ignorant social
discontent.
Our engineers, in order to fill the
great positions in national and muni-
cipal life, however, must be educated
along broader and deeper lines than
are current in the university courses
of today. At the present time our
technical institutions are specializing
too much. Vision, background, know-
ledge of life and the "humanities"
suffer at the expense of an almost
selfish concentration on laboratory
methods.
We must break down the walls
which we are building around the
new generation of young men in our
colleges-walls so high that they can-
not see over. We must so teach that
the boys who are going to become en-
gineers will not remain "privates" or
"non-coms," but can be field officers
and line officers of the highest ranks,
qualified to command and campaign
from the hilltops, looking far ahead
and with historic perspective.
We should develop in America a
new kind of engineer by lengthening
study courses, by broadening interests
and by instruction in the wider range
subjects which deal with all sides of
modern life. Our international lead-
ership in industry, commerce and po-
litical idealism demand superior train-
ing for, the young men awho are to
continue the administration of our
affairs.
As an example of present day limi-
tations; for instance, I may cite a case
which was the cause of actual humil-
iation to me: Some time ago the Gov-
ernment authorized me to appoint' a
commission of engineers and profes-
sors of related subjects to confer with
the leaders of the profession in France
relative to the solution of reconstruc-
tion problems. After many appeals
to a great many universities and many
of the leading engineers of the coun-
try- I succeded in my search to find
professional experts and teachers who
could speak French--just two!
With the extension bf international
activities ahead of us as the results
of war changes we must train our
young scientific men in modern lan-
guages, in history, in economics and
above all in the essentials of general
culture, that they may hold their in-
tellectual "own" in competition with
the scientists of other lands.
(Continued on Page Four)

J.XAT,5 ~ -

/

Big Hotel Victory now open at Put-in-Bay.
Hotel Breakers and the world's greatest bathing beach at Cedar Point.
Excursions every day to Put-in-Bay. To Ohio Points via A & D Line and
Farereund-trip week days - - $ .80 connecting trolley - lines reduces
Fare round-trip Sundaysand Holidays 1.10 fare one-half.
Five hours on the boat. Leaving Detroit at 9:00 a. m., returning at 8:00 p. in.
Cedar Point Excursions on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday;
Steamer Frank E. Kirby leaving Detroit at 8 a. m., returning at 11:50 pm.,
Five hours at Cedar Point. Fare round Trip $1.00. On Steamer Put-in-
Bay F~riday and Sunday $1.35 round'trip.
Finsel's music for dancing Ashley. & Dustin Steamer Line
on Steamer Put-in-Bay. Bal First Street Wharf Detroit, Mich.
room, largest on lake steam.
era. N chareefordancing. Write For Or'Map Showing
Lake Erie Resorts
rden

IF

.1

TODAY ONLY

ANNA Q. NILSSON

/'

-- 11 -
"THE WAY OF THE STRONG"
A REALLY STRONG ATTRACTION ESPEC I A LY IRE COMME N DED
BY THE IANAGER
Who ,at first refused the pitire because the star is not well known,
then later booked It ON ITS OWN MERITS-
He Believes It Is Just the Kind of a
Picture Arcade Patrons Enjoy Seeing.
Also STAR COMEDY, "ALL IN THE SWIM," AND NEWS WIEEKLY
TOMORROW

w a .._.. -t
- - - - I. _ I

o. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE

WUERTH THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00

Tues-Wed-15-16--Tom Mix in "The
Wilderness Trail" with a Lloyd Com-
edy and Kinogram Weekly.
Thurs-Fri - 17-18 -Mitchell Lewis in
"Nine-tenths of the Law" and a two-
reel L-Ko Comedy.
Sat-lO-Bill ie IRhodes in "In Search of
Arcadia" with a News and Comedy.
Sun-Mon-20-21-MARY MILES MIN-
TERS in "THE BACHELOR'S WIFE"
with a SUNSHINE COMEDY, "SON
OF A GUN." Admission 25c, tax in-
cluded.
ORPHEUM THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
Tues-Wed-15-16-Bessie Love in "The
Little Boss" and "THE SILENT MYS-
TERY" No.9.
Thurs- Fri-- 7-18-Charlotte Walker in
"MEN" with a News and Comedy.
Sat-19-Shirley Mason in "Good-bye
Bill" with a Scenic and Comedy (Ret.).
Sun-Mon-20-2 -June Elvidge in "The
Love Defender" with; a Mutt & Jeff
Cartoon Comedy, "Look Pleasant
Please" and Ford Weekly.
Tues-Wed-22-23-Albert Ray in "Be a
Little Sport" with " THE SILENT
MYSTERY," Episode No. 10.
Thurs- Fri-24-25-A Griffith production,
"The Girl Who Staid at Home" with a
News and Comedy (Ret.).

GRUEN WATCHES
SILVERWARE CUT GLASS
LEATHER GOODS
ALARM CLOCKS FOUNTAIN PENS
FINE JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIRING
HALLER f FV LLER

NAZIMOVA

- min -

PA M

STATE STREET JEWELERS

"THE RED

Wq

LANTERN'

(Retlirn Date)

Also Star1Comedy
and Weekly.

LOST
LOST-Some where on campus, a D.
A. R. pin. If found please return
to Wolverine office to receive reward.
LOST-Let the Wolverine help find
that lost article.

WANTED
WANTED-Girls for domestic work in
pantries, nurses dining rooms, and
as maids. Reside in New Employees'
Home with matron in charge. Ad-
dress the Grace Hospital, John R.
St. & Wilis Ave., Detroit, Michigan.(

NAZIM1OVA in
tTHE fEED LANTEQN'l

(No alvance i prices)

THURSDAY-FIDAY-CONSTANCE TAITA D(E in
"THE VElILEI) ADVENTURE"
COMING-"THE THIRD DEGRlEE"

$.75

SUBSCRIBE FOR

$*75

I

L, I

I

NOW

A 35c SUMMER SCHOOL DIRECTORY FREE
WITH EACH SUBSCRIPTION

.

NEWS OF THE CAMPVS, CITY, AND WORLD

SUBSCRIBE AT* WOLVERINE OFFICE

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