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July 08, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-08

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THE WOLVERINE

.. _._

e

wolverine

OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday afternoons
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second-class matter
Subscription by carrer or mail, $r.oo
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street
Phones: Business-96o; Editorial-2414
Hours: Managing Editor-ri:oo to-:oo o'clock daily except Saturday; Business
Manager-i :oo to 2:00 o'clock daily except Saturday
nunications not to exceed Soo words, if signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
rint, but as an evidence of faith, and notices of events will be published in The
at the -discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to the office.
:ned communications will receive no consideration. No manuscript wil be returned
writer incloses postage.
Volverine does not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed in the communications.
Mark K. Ehlbert........................Managing Editor
Phone 2414
J. Ellsworth Robinson.................Business Manager
Phone 960 or 1505
I. Campbell............City Editor Howard Weeks...............Column Editor
arx...............Associate Editor Chas. R. Osius Jr'...........Directory Editor
>ke Hart..............Sports Editor Martha Guernsey............Women's Editor
Mark B. Covell...............Assistant Business Manager
Thornton W. Sargent Jr...,.................Issue Editor
REPORTERS
F. G. Merz Robert W. Taylor
BUSINESS STAFF.
hneider George H. Heideman Richard Lambrecht
James C. Coston William Wachs
TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1919.
COMRADESHIP VS. HERO-WORSHIP OR DISREGARD
en the University opens next fall and finds within her student
ome 250 discharged soldiers sent here by the government, she
confronted by the problem of making these men a part of Mich-
a element harmonizing with the whole and fitting into the col-
smos. The problem will be one that can be solved not by any
regulation but only' through the voluntary action of the students.
a will belong the duty, of welcoming the newcomers into the great
hood of Michigan men, of meeting, them on the plane of equality and
eship. There really is no reason why they should be received oth-
for they will form an integral part of the student body. They
ne here not as a group, but as individuals, and it is as such that
Could be treated.
;ardless, however, of the correct attitude, there will undoubtedly
y factors conducive to having the wounded men viewed as mem-
another sphere. There will be that tendency to hold them off
etter to gain the perspective necessary to hero-worship; or there
that other extreme, equally harmful, - the inclination to disre-
em entirely, to let them shift for themselves without the benefits
ssolace of pleasant companionships.
none of these attitudes will be in keeping with the true spirit of
n. If the men who are to enter our midst are like other war vet-
- and we believe they will be so - then they will wish to be
upon not as heroes nor as differently constituted beings, but as
y flesh-and-blood men. In considering and treating them other-
dichigan students would, assume a position wholly out of har-
rith the spirit of their University - the spirit which dictates that
n shall be looked upon as equals and that good fellowship and
acy shall prevail.
meeting the men who are to come here in the fall, Michigan will
confronted 'by a situation akin to that caused by the organization
S. A. T. C. The advent of the wounded men will not constitute
atslon by persons out of sympathy with University life and ac-
it only as a means of evading immediate service under the colors
tasting of Xhe mysterious college potpourri. Of this latter sort
any of the men present at the University during the first semes-
t those who come here in October will not fall within this cate-
Many of them have already been enrolled as university students
e others enter Michigan because of their desire to secure a higher
on. They are essentially college men and should be treated as
e Federal Vocational board, which has charge of the training o
ged wounded soldiers, has paid a tribute to the University in allow-
large a number to come here for instruction. Michigan men must
their trust and guide their actions accordingly. The wounded
ust be received hospitably, they must be made to feel that they
)art of the University, and they must. share everything that Michi-
s to offer - including the activities and honors of the campus at
so far as their wounds are visible, these men should serve as
t reminders of the war just ended. They should keep before our
in the fact that many men underwent personal sacrifices in their
e to realize an ideal and that it is our duty to live up to that newly
i standard. On the other hand, however, the men should remind
>ut not be reminded - of the conflict. They have done their work
>.longer being soldiers, will want to forget the past and return to
ormal status.
dl finally, the presence of the wounded men will give Michigan
s the opportunity to apply to themselves one of the elements of the
omposite ideal - unselfishness. The newcomers, some of whom
disabled, will have need of the assistance and sympathetic treat-
f their fellows. Giving this aid will be a part of the mission of

n men and they must not default in the accepting and fulfilling

On the Other Hand-
JACK
Of all the pugs he was the king,.
He smiled and strutted in the ring,
A million bucks his friends had bet,
And all went well until he met
Jack.
He beat the coon and all the best
They put against him, then a rest
Five years or so; he had good luck
In his circus game, but then he struck
Jack.
Near seven feet high, a solid wall
Of muscle, yet they hardest fall
Who are the biggest; sure, no one
could lick
Big Jess, but look who turned the
trick,
Jack.
WE'RE GLAD THEY SAID FIGHT
Healine-"Toledo Fight Bugs Battle
for Beds."
"The Jeopardy of Jess or the Chal-'
lenge of Chance," Willard's movie, isn't
drawing so well, it is rumored.
The big fellow, as Ring Lardner has
nicknamed Jess, must -feel just about
like the kAiser now.
A friend who saw the fight said that
when Jack hit Jess the first time you
could hear the crack in Cleveland and
when Jess hit the boards on the small
of his back all the fishing smacks in
Lake Erie came into harbor,
A TASTY BIT OF NEWS
Just before dinner the other day we
heard that one of the-waiters at the
hash house where we feed had small-
pox.
The Chinese have refused to sign the
peace treaty. That sort of takes the
starch out of the League of Nations.
OVERHEARD AT FOSTER'S

BAPTISTSUMMER

SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS

STUDENTS

We offer quantities of New and Second Hand

INFORMAL
OUTDOOR
4 PARTY $
321 East Ann Street

TEXT BOOKS.

for all departments. Our
BOOKS, FOUNTAIN

stock of LOOSE LEAF NOTE
PENS, Etc., Etc., is complete.

TUESDAY, JULY 81
a8P.M.I
You Are Welcome
EDUCATORS DISCUSS
TEACHERS' PROBLEMS
(Editor's Note: Following is the
third and last group of extracts from
addresses at the recent convention of
the National Education association.)
"In many of the larger cities of the
country teachers have become a fac-
tor in public affairs," stated Hugh S.
Magill, field secretary, National Edu-
cation association, Washington, . DC.,
speaking on "Constructive Work in
Education."
"Politicians have had to reckon with
the teachers in New York and Chica-
go for a number of years. Their in-
fluence has been felt because of their
unitedhaction, and because theywhave
had the co-operation of other forward-
looking men and women interested in
the promotion of public welfare.
"The teachers of America, through
the National Education association,
are molding public sentiment today as
never before. They are united in sup-
port of a great legislative program
providing for a department of educa-
tion with a secretary in the President's
cabinet, and for federal aid in support
of public education. Their influence is
being strongly felt in Washington.
Congress is taking a keen interest in
the ir demands, and the justice of their
cause is attracting public attention
throughout the country.
"The revised Smith-Tower educa-
tional bill now before congress, puts
the power of the national government
strongly back of public education with-
out in any way encroaching upon the
rights or prerogatives of the state. If
this bill becomes a law education will
be given a tremendous impetus in
every state of the nation, but each
state will continue to manage and con-
trol its educational system without the
slightest interference on the part of
the federal government. Just as agri-
culture has been greatly advanced and
promoted by the department of agri-
culture in the federal government so
will education be promoted by the es-
tablishment of a department of educa-
tion.
"The national government has made
liberal appropriations for the promo-
tion of special education, but has failed
to go right to the heart of the subject
and encourage the states in the train-
ing and support of teachers and the
promotion of general education. Vo-
cational education is important and
should be promoted, but it is not so
essential to the welfare of the nation
as that every child should have the
opportunity to obtain a good common
school education. The Americanization
of adult immigrants and the attempted
education of adult illitei'ates is very
necessary, but the most effective place
to teach American ideals is in our
public schools, and if free school priv-
ileges are guaranteed to every child in
America, illiteracy will soon disap-

A Cordial Welcome and Unusual Service at

Wahr's University Bookstores
For Traveling A nywhere Anyttme
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank, They
come in. denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASKA US
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S. State St.
r ckcets" Arcade
Go to LYNDON'S 719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Eastman Kodaks

Eastman Films

GUARANTEED AMATEUR FINISHING
ENLARGEMENTS FROM YOUR NEGATIVES A SPECIALTY
I have led while others followed in amateur finishing for twelve
years. Now we are still leading. We guarantee perfect results
or no charge. We give you "Peace Time Results" as we have
a plenty of Metol (which we could sell at $50.oo per lb.) and
we venture to say that no other firm is usi.ng Metol for finishing.
If you want the best results you will bring your films here'

She:
He:
She:

"George is such a lazy boy."
"Howzats?"
"Hie even throws kisses."

Two Doors from
Hill Auditorium

L YNDON'S

71g North
University Avenue

A rathef jingled gent down in Tole-
do last wk. end went into a bank and
demanded stimulant because he saw
4% on thv window.
"Yes," said the old Grad, "I can re-
member the time around here when
the boys used to get. Phi Beta Kappa
keys."
ONE FAMILY EXPENSE CUT DOWN
In Saginaw the chief of police rules
that baby cabs need no tail lights.
'Jever notice that the height of a
young woman's enjoyment seems to be
putting her fist through your straw
hat?
BUT NOT QUITE
We have thousands of dishes we are
almost going to give away at the Mich-
igan Union.-Adv.
The lady was looking about the
wraps' department (w'e hope that's
what you call it) and"the salesgirl
said, "Here's something fetching in a
little red sports coat."
"Yes," said the lady, "but you see I
am not a little red sport."
HE'S ALL FOR GIVING THE COUN-
TRY BACK TO THE INDIANS
Lord Somethingorother landed the
other day and was greeted with, the
news that America was dry. "No
whisky," said his grace, "what rot!"
And he took the next boat back.
It is said that the old sport of slid-
ing down the cellar door will be re-
vised this year. Of course it must be
that kind of a cellar.j

Do you want a beautiful campus view?
Call at 713 East University Avenue
YOU CAN GET
Satisfactory Results from Your Films if you leave them at Quarry's.
THE SWAINS
WILL DEVELOP AND PRINT THEM
SCHAEBERLE & SON Music House
110 SO. MAIN ST.
Complete line of High Grade Pianos, Player
Pianos, Victrolas, Victor Records
All String and Wind
Instruments
SEE US FOR YOUR MUSICAL WANTS

Wolverine delivered at your door
three times a week at $1.00 per term.
Read the Wolverine for Campus
News.

TYPEWITERS,
FOR RENT
OR SALE
HAMILTON
BUSINESS
COLLECE
STATE AND WILLIAM

SUMMER SCHOOL LECTURES

of the important features of the University Summer session is
uber of lectures given during the term by prominent men both
outside the University. Every week finds some special discus-
f interesting topics, and the student who misses them is losing
y the chance to learn something aside from his regular course of
but also the opportunity to become acquainted with the speakers,
e mostly of national repute.
ile. students are here primarily for a prescribed course of study,
ould devote the greater part of their time to it, yet it is these
ectui'es 'that add to University life, that broaden one's experience
range of knowledge, that relieve the monotony of daily lessons,
at are later remembered with distinct pleasure and apprecia-
fact that the speakers on the Summer session program are ex-
n their line, men who are doing things in the world, and who in
y circumstances would not be able to appear here, ,enhances the
f these lectures. The summer gives these men the time to come to
iversity, and the University the opportunity to benefit by their
e. A self-imposed course in "Outside Lectures" would yield as
.s 'any regular course in the curriculum, and would be infinitely
aried and perhaps even more .interesting.

The kaiser has awed up his 5,000th
tree. That's bette than breaking rock,
anyway.
HEY, OFFICER, CALL A COP
From the Ann Arbor T. N.: "Mich-
igan officers arrest Wisconsin police-
men."
SPORT IN WASHTENAIV COUNTY
Also from the T. N.: "Then in the
eighth inning a boy hurled a rock at
the Ypsilanti pitcher and Ann Arbor
won the ball game."
DON'T SLIP, C.
C. B. Hobbs is reshingling his house.
-A. A. T. N. H. W.
Baptists To Hold Outdoor Reception
An informal outdoor reception for
Baptist summer school students will
be held at 8 o'clock this evening at
the Baptist parsonage, 321 East Ann
street. All Baptist students are invit-
ed to attend.

pear.
"Education is so vitally essential to
the very life of our nation that patri-
otic considerations demand that the
national government shall encourage
and assist the states in its promotion.
The nation, the state and the local
community should each bear a just
slare of the necessary expense, for
each shares in the benefits derived.
From lack of adequate support our
public education has deteriorated in
many places. The question of who
shall teach the children of today, the
citizens of tomorrow, is of vital con-
cern to the whole country. So long as
our schools are taught by men and
women of character and ability, im-
bued with the spirit and ideals of Am-
.erica the future of our country is se-
cure , but in many localities young
Americans are today being taught by
teachers of foreign accent, of foreign
habits of thought, and foreign stand-.
ards of living. If we are to preserve
our free institutions and perpetuate'
the fundamental principles of our gov-
ernment we cannot neglect the nation-
al aspect of public education."
"For genuine and far-reaching re-
sults in music education there is no,
(Continued on Page Three)

ARROW
'T'OYR c c74ILON┬žD
SOFT COLLARS
FIT WELL-WASH EASILY
Cluett, Peabody 4 Co., hc., Troy, N. 1 .

11

Absolutely
The Coolest Piece in Town
Air Changed Once a Minute
ICE CREAM and HOME
MADE CANDIES
The Sugar Bowl
Phone 967 109 SO, STATE
Courteous and satlsfactQry
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
Tbe AnnArbor-Sarings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $5,50,000.00
esources .........$4,000,000.00
nrthwst.C or.Ma in& uro.

The
weighs
use.

light portable typewriter
9% lbs. Over 225,000 ill

ndenburg wants to take the responsibility, for the war.
t back in the limelight, even if he hangs for it.

He's

Other makes of machines taken
in exchange. Price with case $50.
I sell and rent all makes of type-
writers at lowest market prices.
TYPEWRITING and
MIMEOGRAPHING
a specialty
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE

t even at that we doubt whether we'd go

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