100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 08, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'INUI D FAIR
TODAY

.J

Ulolrri nr

ATr YOUR DOOI
THREE TITLES
A WEEK

X. No. 5.:

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1919.

PRICE THREE C.

St, M PRESENTED
COLE V. C.VAUGHAN
FOR wgAR SERVICE
EDICAL DEAN WINS MEDAL FOR
AID IN STE)MING DIS-
EASE
CULTY MEN ATTEND
)RT WAYNE CEREMONY

George Sisler, '15 L, Former Mlichzigan
Star, Has .338 Vatting Average
George Sisler, '15E, former Univer- three games and Cornell was shut out
sity of Michigan baseball star, now twice, these two teams being consider-
with the St. Louis American league ed the strongest in the East. Syra-
club, is hitting at a .338 clip according cuse was defeated in all three games
to batting averages released July 5. played. Notre Dame was beaten two
Sisler ranks fifth in the American out of three games after the Catholics
league in batting, and leads the league had won from the Conference cham-
n total bases. pions. Michigan had whipped the
Peckinpaugh, of New York, and strongest southern nines during her
Cobb, Veach. and Flagstead, of the De- spring training trip, giving the Maize
troit Tigers, lead Sisler in batting, and Blue an undisputed claim to the
but the former Michigan star is gain- national title.

an Engineering Officer
Award For Overseas
Work

Gets

Colonel Victor C. Vaughan, dean of
the Medical school, was presented with
the Distinguished Service medal by
May9r Couzens of Detroit, in a public
ceremony held Monday afternoon at
For Wayne.
The medal was awarded by the war
department some weeks ago for Colon-
el Vaughan's having given invaluable
advice and services in connection with
communicable diseases, and especially
contributing to the control of the in-
fiuenza epidemic.
The ceremony was attended by army
'.nd navy officers, Detroit city officials,
members of the faculty of the Univer-
sity and of the Wayne county Medical
association, and representatives of the
Michigan Central railroad.
Colonel G. H. Webb, a civil engineer
of the Michigan Central railroad, was
at the same time presented with a
medal for supervising the construction
of railroads and bridges in the battle
area of France under difficult condi-
tions.
EARTH'S INTERIOR
NOT MOLTEN MASS
-PROFESSOR HOBBS.
Three proofs to support the theory
that the interior of the earth is not a
molten mass, but a solid, were
brought out by Prof. W. H. Hobbs, of
the geology department, in his lec-
ture "The Principles of Volcanism"
delivered Monday afternoon in the Na-
tural Science auditorium.
He first showed that a hard boiled
egg would spin and that a fresh egg
would not, then applying this analogy
to demonstrate that the earth would
not spin if it were molten inside. The
second proof was that, inasmuch as
the -ocean is moved by the moon, if
the earth were a crust the molten mass
would be affected, not permitting th
inhabitants of the earth to see the
movement of the tide.
Thirdly e showed that, as rocks are
heavier than lava, it would be impossi-
ble for the earth's crust to remain
over the liquid interior. Professor
Hobbs said that the production of lava
in volcanos was a local ation, occur-
ing only in the vicinity of the volcano.
The remainder of the lecture was de-
voted to telling of the pecularities of
folcanism. The speaker said that trees
n the path of a lava stream were not
burned but swept along with the
stream.
NEWBERRY DORM TO ENTERTAIN
MEMBERS OF WOMEN'S LEAGUE
Summer school women, either be-
longing to or desiring to become mem-
bers of the Women's league, will be
entertained at a reception to be held
In the Helen Newberry Residence at 4
o'clock Thursday afternoon. A short
program will follow and all are cordi-
ally invited to attend.

COLONEL VICTOR C. VAUGHAN
ESTABLISHMENT DOF6GFT
FUND STRTED BY GRAS
Establishment of a University of
Michigan Alumni fund is the present
plan of the Alumni association of the
University. This fund will consist of
gifts from Michigan Alumni and will
be devoted to supplying any immed-
iate pecuniary needs of the University.
The plan was first presented to the
class of 1916 by Wilfred B. Shaw, '04,
editor of the Michigan Alumnus, and
contributions to it have been made by
that class and also by the classes of
1917 and 1919. Payments are made
o this fund through a class officer,
known as a class agent. All gifts will
be known as bequests of the class of
which the donor is a member.
This plan has already been tried at
Yale, Cornell, Princeton, and Brown
universities with success, according to
Mr' Shaw.
10 U. S. STUDENTS
TO GO TO SWEDEN
New York, July 7.-The names of 10
American college students who will
receive $1,000 each to enable them to
o to Sweden to study in exchange with
the Swedish students to come to Am-
erica, have been announced by the
American - Scandinavian foundation,
which arranged the interchange. The
men appointed are: -.
Samuel G. Frantz, of Princeton, N.
J., Princeton university; Harry F.
Yancey, of Urbana, Ill., University of
Missouri; Chester C. Stewart, of Wil-
mington, Del., Massachusetts Institute
of Technology; Harry W. Titus, of
Laramie, Wyo., University of Wyom-
ing; Robert C. Sessions, of Worcester,
Mass', Worcester Polytechnic Insti-
tute; Clarence N. Ostergren, of Hobo-
ken, N. J., Sheffield Scientific School;
William S. Moir, of Boston, Mass., Yale
Forestry School; Henry M. Meloney, of
Syracuse, N. Y., State School of For-
estry at Syracuse niversity; Rudolph
E. Zetterstrand, of Munhall, Pa., Shef-
field Scientic School, and Thomas
Fraser, of Urbana, Ill., University of
Illinois. Four of these men will study
chemistry, two hydro-electrical eng-
ineering, two forestry and two metal-
lurgy.
In making the announcement the
American - Scandinavian foundation
says that the interchange of students
is proof that American and European
students are freed from the dominance
of German learning and German uni-
versities. A few years ago, it is said,
these 20 American and Swedish stu-
dents would have gone to German uni-
versities..
HARRY A. FRANCK, '03, NOTED
AUTHOR, WEDS WE STOVER GRAD
Harry A. Franck, '03, a well known
author of books on travel, was mar-
ried June 28, in Chestnut Hill, Pa.,
to Miss Rachael Whitehall Latta, ac-
cording to a letter received from him
by Mr. Wilfred B. Shaw, '04, editor of
the Michigan Alumnus.
Mrs. Franck is a Westover alumnae,
clas of 1912.
Mr. Franck recently completed a 35-
day trip through Germany with the
American Expeditionary forces, after
having served during the war as a
member of the military censorship
bureau In France. He now taking a
Western automobile trip and may visit
Mr. Shaw in Ann Arbor.

Detroit, Mich., July 7. - Michigan
draft evaders who fled to Canada, Mex-
ico and other countries are to be giv-
en immediate attention by federal of-

ing rapidly on the league leaders. Dur-
ing his last seven games Sisler has
made 11 hits, four being two baggers
:nd one a triple.
Sisler has had 219 times at bat this
season and has made 74 hits. Eighteen
of these have been two baggers, four
have been triples, and four home runs.
Ty Cobb's Greatest Rival
, Sisler is recognized as Ty Cobb's
greatest rival in baseball, not only as
a slugger but as an all round player.
He is one-of the best base runners in
the American league and the peer of
the younger organization's first base-
men.
Sisler starred on Michigan's 1913,
1914 and 1915 baseball teams, and
while yet an undergraduate was sought
by Barney Dreyfus, of the Pittsburgh
club, and other big league owners and
managers. He was first coached by
Branch Rickey and later by Coach Carl
Lundgren, under whose care he devel-
oped into the greatest all round base-
ball player ever turned out at Mich-
igan.
Captain of 1914 Varsity
Sisler captained the 1914 Varsity
which won the national college cham-
pionship with 23 games won out of 29
played, and which scored 169 runs to
76 for its opponents. That year the
Wolverines shut out their opponents
in 10 games of the 23 won, largely ow-
ing to the remarkable pitching of Sis-
ler.
Pennsylvania was beaten two out of
SCHOOL TO GIVE
SECOND RECITAL
Mrs. George B. Rhead and Robert R.
Dieterle will appear in a joint pro-
gram .in the second of the series of
complimentary recitals to be given by
the faculty of the School of Music,
Wednesday evening in Hill auditorium.
Mrs. Rhead, a member of the piano
faculty, is an artist of wide recogni-
tion, having appeared many times in
Ann Arbor and also in other cities of
the country.
Mr. Dieterle, who has recently been
appointed a member ,of the vocal fac-
ulty, has just returned after appear-
ing at the Peterboro, New Hampshire,
musical festival. Recently he won the
state contest for young singers in De-
troit and later the sectional contest
held in Chicago.
The general public is invited but are
requested to be in their seats at the
hour of opening, 8 o'lock. It is also
asked that parents refrain from bring-
ing small children.
The program in full is as follows:
Vergin tutto Amor .......... Durante
Lungi dal caro beve ..........Seechi
Adieu chere Louise (Le Des-
ertuer).......... .......Monsigny
Arietto ........................Vidal
Robert Richard Dieterle
Caprice al ceste.... Gluck-Saint-Saens
Mrs. George B. Rhead
Aria: Zaza, piccola zingara from
Zaza ................Leoncavallo
Mr. Dieterle
Reverie ......................Strauss
Etincelles
Etude, G flat .............Moszkowski
Mrs, Rhead
Jean .......................Burleigh
A Banjo Song . .............Homer
The Spirit Flower....Campbell-Tipton
Daybreak ...................Daniels
Mr. Dieterle
Dorothy Phoebe Wines, Accompanist.
E. E. PARDEE, '17, PUBLICITY
MAN FOR INTER-ALLIED GAMES
Lieut. Earl' E. Pardee, '17, formerly
of The Michigan Daily sport staff,
handled publicity for the Inter-Allied
games in France at which the Ameri-

can entries made a spectacular show-
ing. The games extended over a per-
iod of two weeks and closed July 6.
+ifteen nations were represented in the
games.
Lieutenant Pardee went overseas
with one of the ambulance units or-
ganized on the Michigan campus in the
snring of 1917..

lit for .300
Sisler hit for .300 or better all three
years at Michigan, topping the .400 fig-
ure in 1915, his, final season at Ann
Arbor. The 1915 team was woefully
weak with the stick, Sisler's work
alone redeeming the work of the Wol-
verines in this department.
Time after time the Maize and Blue
star hurled remakable games. Among
these were the one and two hit games
that he pitched against Cornell and
M. A. C. respectively in 1915, and the
10 to 0 victory he scored over Pennsyl-
vania in the next to the last game of
his college career.
In the last named contest he made
four hits in four times at bat, one of
his clouts being a home run. The next
day on Ferry field in his final game as
a Michigan player, Sisler hit safely
three times out of four times up, driv-
ing in two of Michigan's four runs and
scoring the other two himself. In ad-
dition, he stole five bases, stealing sec-
ond, third and home in succession on
one occasion, and played a brilliant
game in the field.
On All-American
In both 1913 and 1914 Sisler was
placed on the All-Ameican baseball
team picked by 75 coaches and sport-
ing writers named by Vanity Fair, he
being the only westerner to win a
place in either year. He went direct
from the University to the St. Louis
Browns, then managed by. Branch
Rickey, Sisler's former coach,and im-
mediately became a big league star.
In his first game with St. Louis Sis-
ler pitched the Browns to-a 3 to 1 vic-
tory over Cleveland, striking out nine
men. It is as a first baseman, how-
ever, that Sisler has made his big
league reputation, and in this depart-
ment he stands unequalled. In field-
ing, batting, stolen bases and total
bases he has ranked near the top each
year. Playing on a mediocre club he
is one of the most cordially feared men
in the league. He has the best chance
of any man now in either league to bet-
ter Ty Cobb's all-time record.
AMERICA IS O. K.,
DECLARE FRENCH
"America is all right." This is the
message which Prof. Rene Talamon
received from his French friends aft-
er they had seen the American sold-
ier in action.
"For some time," said Professor Tal-
amon in his lecture "French in Am-
erica," given July 4 in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium, "the French had been
doubtful as to the American ability to
fight. They knew he was present in
numbers, but were 'not certain as to
his fighting qualities.
"This was caused somewhat by the
Americans being a little dissatisfied
with conditions which they found in
France. They were not used to the
mud and the straw. The fear of the
French was soon- dispelled though,"
said Professor Talamon.
Professor Talamon did not tell of
the campaign of the American army
and its accomplishments in France,
but dealt more with the French atti-
tude toward the Yankee soldier. He
showed that the dough boy was loved
by the entire population of France and
told stories illustrating the depth of
French regard for Americans.
"The misunderstanding of French
conditions by some of the more ignor-
ant of the Americans has caused them
to bring back a false idea of France,"
stated the speaker. "Much of the dis-
satisfaction with French things has
been stirred up by German propagand-
ists who are endeavoring to separate
France from America after the war.
"This can be avoided by a better un-

derstanding between the two nations,
which really have common bounds.
Knowledge will bring this about. The
college men who were in France real-
fez the depth of the French and, by
their attendance at the army univer-
sity and French universities, are de-
veloping French sympathies."

WOLSEY LECTURES
TOBEGIN TODAY
At 5 o'clock this evening Rabbi Wol-
sey of Cleveland, Ohio, will deliver the
first of a series of three lectures
which he will give this week in the
auditorium of the Natural Science
building.
Rabbi Wolsey's topic in all three lec-
tures will deal with the Jew in Eng-
lish literature as portrayed by var-
ious English authors. In his talks, the
rabbi will include about eight well
known authors, explaining the charac-
terizations of the Jews in the realm of
literature.
This evening Rabbi Wolsey's lecture
will deal with Chr'istopher Marlowe,
William Shakespeare, and Richard
Cumberland as portrayers of Jewish
types.
At 5 o'clock tomorrow evening the
authors to be considered will be Walt-
er Scott and Charles Dickens, and in
the last lecture on July 10, Rabbi Wol-
sey will discuss the Jew as represent-
ed by Benjamin Disraeli, Robert
Browning, and George Eliot.
FOUR CHAPS TO ATTEND
STATE GOLF TOURNAMENT
SAGWIN A1Y CONTEST TO ATTRACT
NOTED PLAYERS; TO LAST
FOUR DAYS
Saginaw, Mich., July 7.-The twelfth
annual tournament of the Michigan
State Golf league, to be held here July
9 to 12, inclusive, will bring together
one of the finest lists of players in the
history of the sport in this state, it is
declared. Among the contestants will
be four ex-state champions, Jimmy
Standish, Phil Stanton, 'Wylie Car-
hartt and Howard Lee. Each has won
the championship at least once./ Many
other golf leaders will also attend and
practically every section of the state
will be represented in the meeting.
The program, just announced by
Secretary S. A. Sommers, follows:
July 9-Qualifying round, 18 holes,
medal play. Before the qualifying
round each club is requested to report
a team of four men to play for the as-
sociation team championship. Total
scores will count, the team having the
lowest score to win and the team
championship trophy will become the
property of the club represented by the
winning team. The 32 lowest scores
will play 18 holes the following day. Of
these the 16 lowest for 36 holes will
compose the championship flight; the
remaining 16 to make up the second
flight.
Annual Meeting
The annual meeting will be held in
the early evening of July 9 when offic-
ers will be elected and the tournament
city for next year will be picked.
July 10-First round, 18 holes, all
flights excepting first and second; 18
holes medal play for 32 lowest scores
of previous day; first round, 18 holes,
for first and second flights; second
round, 18 holes, for all other flights;
first round, 18 holes, consolation, first
and second flights excepted.
Second Round
July 11-Second round, 18 holes, first
and second flights; semi-finals in all
other flights; semi-finals, first and sec-
ond flights, 18 holes; finals in all oth-
er flights and consolations, 18 holes.
July 12-Finals, 36 holes, first and
second flights; presentation of cups to
winners by President L. C. Shade.
Trophies-Team championship cup;
gold medal for best qualifying round;
first flight championship, Marshall
Foch cup; second flight, General Per-

shing cup; third flight, Field Marshal
Haig cup; fourth flight General Diaz
cup; fifth flight, Chateau Thierry cup;
sixth flight, Argonne cup; seventh
flight, St. Mihiel cup; eighth flight,
Sedan cup; ninth flight, Juvigny cup;
tenth flight, Eighty-flifth division cup.
WOLVERINE SUBSCRIBERS

ANCIENT BATTLEFIELDS
STUDIED IN LIGHT
RECENT WAR

$25,000 IN GIFTS FINANCE
EXPEDITION TO EUROP
George R. Swain to Act as Photograp
er; Military Expert Will Be
Assigned
In the interests of humanistic r
search and having as its main oe
the surveying of Caesar's ancient Eu
opean battlefields in the light of tI
recent war, an expedition headed t
Prof. Francis W. Kelsey of the Lat
department will leave the Universi
in a few months for Europe and ti
Near East. The expedition has be
made possible by gifts to the Unive
sity of $25,000.
Professor Kelsey will be accompai
ied by Mr. George R. Swain, technic
expert in photography in the Unive
sity, and also by a military expert y
to be assigned. Other specialists me
be added if the need arises.
"One of the chief objects of the e:
pedition," said Professor Kelsey, "wi
be a re-study of the campaigns c
Julius Caesar in the light of the Gre
war. Caesar's battlefields are four
not only in France and Belgium but
Spain, North Africa, northern Greec
Asia Minor, and Egypt. In notable Ii
stnaces, as along the Aisne, Caesar
battlefields have been fought over
recent years. The principles of stra
egy which he employed have been free
used by generals in the war wh<
lately closed.
"Nothwithstanding the intens
study given to the campaigns
Caesar since the reign of Napoleon II
under whose direction extensive r
searches were made, many interesti
problems remain unsolved, and ti
present is an opportune time to atta(
them.
"As a part of his work for the e:
pedition, Mr. Swain has been reques
ed by the curator of anthropoloy in t
Smithsonian Institute in Washngt
to prepare photographs of certain, ra
ial types, especially in Asia Minor. T
collection of such photographs
Washington is among the most co
plete in the world but lacks mater
from Asia Minor, which is of spem
importance for anthropological stu
on account of the contact of diver
racial types.
"The expedition will start as soon
the food conditions in Europe becon
less acute. This situation will u:
Ooubtedly be relieved soon after the d
tribution of the harvests of the prese:
year, which should be well under wa
in August. The field work will requi
a year."
WHAT'S GOING ON
July 8
5 p. m.-The Jew in English Liter
ture as represented by Christoph
Marlowe, WiliamnShapespeare,La
Richard Cumberland, Rabbi Lo
Wolsey, Cleveland, 0.
8 p. m.-Some Interesting Phases
the Development of Dentistry (Illu
trated), Prof. N. S. Hoff.
8:30 p. m.-Visitors' night at the 0
'servatory, admission by ticket on
July 9
5 p. m.-The Jew in English Liter
ture as represented by Walter Se
and Charles Dickens, Rabbi Lot
Wolsey, Cleveland, 0.
8 p m.-Concert. Faculty of the U
versity School of Music (Hill au
torium).
8:30 p. m.-Visitors' night at the 0
servatory, admission by ticket on
July 10
5 p. m.-The Jew in English Liter

ture as represented by Benjani
Disraeli, Robert Browning, a
George Eliot, Rabbi Louis Wols(
Cleveland, 0.
8 p. m.-Educational motion pictur
RIGHT THIS WAY! GET A KING;
278 OF 'EM ARE JOBLESS NO
Paris, July 7.-Some 278 kings a
near kings are out of a job as a r
sulk of the war, according to late

KELSEY TO HEAD,
RESEARCH PARTYFO NVBi

TO
OF

,.
-4 4
I1'
l

TENNIS ENTRIES OPEN

Entries for the summer tennis
tournament to be held soon on Fer-
ry field courts, under the auspices
of the Athletic association, are now
open at Moe's Athletic Shop, Wat;
erman gymnasium, and at The
Wolverine office. Men wishing to
participate may sign up at any
of these places.
An entrance fee of 25 cents will
be charged, the receipts from this
source to be used for buying of the
prizes. Mr. Moe has already of-
fere a ozen tennis balls as one of

The following people who have
subscribed for The Wolverine
have not left 'their addresses at
The Wolverine office, and we are
therefore unable to deliver their
papers:
J. M. Holt.
C. E. Behrens.
'T. B. Douglas.
Frank Sisung.
[ L. J. Schwab.
L. S. Gray.
t

use the latter part

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan