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July 23, 1958 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-07-23

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PPTS JOINER RESOLUTION:
ity Council To Begin New Plans for Urban Renewal

Situation Grave

U' Awards

/

rather than renewal, and entail
less destruction and replacement
of existing structures, and fewer
relocation problems.
Establishes Committee
By the same resolution, the
Council authorized establishment
of a new Plan Standards Com-
mittee, to be composed of city of-
ficials and individuals from the
area concerned, which would be
given the task of formulating a
revised code of, planning stand-
ards in cooperation with a number
of residents of the area slated for
rehabilitation.
The Joiner resolution expressed
the appreciation of the Council to
members of the Citizens Commit-
tee on Urban Renewal for "the
vast amount of work done on the
urban renewal plans," but deemed
the present plan too drastic and
therefore unacceptable.

The Council also approved un-
animously a resolution by Coun-
cilman Richard Dennard propos-
ing that the city seek an exten-
sion of the federal government
deadline for submitting a final
plan. They had hoped to have a
plan ready for submission to fed-
eral housing authorities by mid-
October.
Federal approval of final, de-
tailed plans is necessary to qualify
for government financial aid,
which would pay about two-thirds
of the cost of the project.
Dennard's resolution also pro-
posed establishing a means of con-
tinual contact and cooperation
with residents of the project area.
Asks New Plan
On the question of whether or
not the new plan would meet fed-
eral standards and win approval
of the Federal Housing and Home
Finance Agency (HHFA), Joiner
said it was impossible to proceed
with the present plan, and advo-
cated formulation of a plan to
meet local needs, and strong per-
suasion to obtain government ap-
proval.
The new Plan Standards Com-
mittee will include Ann Arbor's
Mayor, Prof. Samuel J. Elders-
veld of the political science de-
partment, City Administrator Guy
C. Larcom, and Councilmen Rich-
ard Dennard, James F. Brinker-
hoff, Lloyd M. Ives and Florence
R. Crane,, plus "a substantial
number of persons living or work-
ing in the area and others inter-
ested in the problem . , ."
For the initial step in forma-
tion of the complete committee,
the city will ask the North Cen-
tral Citizens Association to se-
lect seven persons living or work-
ing in the area to meet with city
officials and suggest names of
possible candidates for the com-
mittee.

Fellowships
IEducation
Nine fellowships for the 1958-59
academic year have been an-
nounced by Prof. Algo D. Hender-
son of the education school, direc-
tor of the University's Center for
the Study of Higher Education.
Four fellowships were awarded
in higher education, and five
Michigan fellowships in college
administration. Amounts vary
from $500 to $2,500.
James L. Miller, Leslie W. Ross,
Jerome A. Fallon and Carl A.
Haag received the higher educa-
tion fellowships, which call for
either completion of a minimum
of one year of graduate work or
experience in college teaching or
administration.
Michigan Fellows
The Michigan fellows are Prof.
Mahlon H. Hellerich of the history
department of Towson State
Teachers College, Baltimore, Md.;
Ray Hawk, University of Oregon's
Dean of Men; Prof. Karl W. Meyer
of Wisconsin State College's his-
tory department; Richard R. Bond,
Dean of Men and director of Sum-
mer School at Salem College,
Salem, W. Va., and Preston J.
Stegenga, president of North-
western College, Orange City, Ia,
Winners of this fellowship were
required to have a doctor's degree
or the equivalent and three more
years experience in college teach-
ing or administration. They must
also have shown superior ability in
educational leadership.
Suited to Individuals
Prof. Henderson explained that
each recipient must attend at least
one seminar a semester, but that
otherwise, the post-doctoral pro-
gram is suited to individual needs.
Besides additional courses, the
fellow may engage in a research
program if he wishes. Some in-
ternships are also available.
The project was provided for by
the Carnegie Corporation of New
York. Its purpose is to provide
additional faculty and fellowships
for both graduate students and
in-service administrators.

'.'

starring

-Daily-Al Erbe
HERE LIES-What? Or Who? Nobody at the Undergraduate Library knows. The tiny grave appeared
during the night; its, inhabitant might be, perhaps, an Untknown Soldier who gave his life in a war
between the stacks. And then again, it could Just as easily be someone's half-eaten lunch.
Challenge Gifted Pupils, Jameson Says

Sunday, July 27
at 8:30 P.M.

1429 Hill Street

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Gifted high school English stu-
dents like something to gnaw on,
Robert U. Jameson, English de-
partment chairman of Haverforc
School, Haverford, Pa., said re-
cently.
Jameson gave the fifth speech
in the Conference Series for
Teachers of English.
The important thing in chal-
lenging the superior student is to
make him sit down and think be-
fore writing, Jameson declared.
"Give him a topic which is im-
portant and significant to him,"
he said. "The idea of a theme is
not to talk in a vacuum using a
lot of pretty words, but to talk to
someone."
Respond Well
Gifted students respond well to
the analytical approach to litera-
ture he added. Books, he noted,
which are especially suited to the
gifted are "Huckleberry Finn,"
"The Old Man and the Sea,"
"Lord Jim," "Silas Marner," and
"Tale of Two Cities" in addition
to Shakespeare.
"It's not more reading that is
necessary, but deeper reading,"
Jaineson continued. "It is this
depth that challenges the gifted
most."

The superior student, Jameson
noted, is ambitious, reasonably well
rounded, has demonstrated ability
to write with a minimum of
mechanical difficulty, and has an
I.Q. of 116 or more.
Ambition Important.
The most important character-
istic is his ambition, Jameson de-
clared, because "there is no use
in challenging the student who
doesn't have drive."
He said teachers of gifted stu-
dents should have "enough energy
to work 28 hours per day" and
"courage to do some hard talking
to the school administration."
Teaching the gifted takes time,

he explained, and such a teacher
who is forced to have the same
schedule as the others is being
wronged.
He recommended that a pro-
gram devoted to the gifted start
in the ninth grade when adoles-
cence and the mechanics and
routine, of English should be out
of the way. By this time, he added,
the student probably has the be-
ginnings of motivation.
Haverfbrd, the school in which
Jameson teaches, is a boys' school
with a curriculum running from
kindergarten to high school. The
school is designed primarily to
prepare its students for college.

in-service administrators.
. \..........A..... -
~ ., S. ___

I

t
5::::

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

'.vx :. :::> ' isV:5I~f ii ....* :< .. .,:. .: A. : . .7^n: .rr y

DIAL NO 2-2513
NOW SHOWING

11

CINemAScoPG E hGHROAD PRESNTRIO
STARTS SATURDAY
ANTHONY
QUINN
as Attila the Hun!
SOPHIA
LOREN
who brought the Hun to his knees!
JO eP s f EVIN h dSt-.
r

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m., the day preced-
ing publication.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 1958
VOL. LXVIII, NO. 20-S
DIAL NO 8-6416
NOW SHOWING
MARLON BRANDO
in "TEAHOUSE
OF THE AUGUST
MOON" plus
BING CROSBY
in "HIGH SOCIETY"
- FRIDAY AND SATURDAY -
CHARLTON HESTON
JANET LEIGH
ORSON WELLES
in
"TOUCH OF EVIL"

General Notices
Regents' Meeting: Fri., Sept. 26. Com-
munications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than Sept. 16.
Seniors: College of L.S.&A. and
Schools of Educ., Music, Public Health,
and Bus. Admiin.: Tentative lists of
seniors for Aug. graduation have been
posted on the bulletin board in the
first floor lobby, Admin. Bldg. Any
changes therefrom should be requested
of the Recorder at Office of Registra-
tion and Records Window Number A,
1513 Admin. Bldg.
Classical Studies Coffee-Hour: The
faculty, students, and friends of the
Dept. of Classical Studies are cordially
invited to a coffee-hour on Thurs., July
24, at 4:15 p.m. in the E. Conf. Rm., of
the Rackham Bldg. Prof. Cambon will
speak on "Latin in the Italian Curricu-
lum.:"
Applications for U. of M. Research In-
stitute Fellowships (formerly Engineer-
ing Research Institute) to be awarded
for the fall semester, 1958-59, are now
being accepted in the office of the
Graduate School. The stipend'Is $1,175
per semester. Application forms are
available from the Graduate School.
Only applicants who lhave been em-
ployed by the Institute for at least one
year on at least a half-time basis are
eligible. Applications and supporting
material are due in the office of the
Graduate Schc il not later than 4:00
p.m., Fri., Aug. 22, 1958.
Lectures
La Sociedad Hispanica of the Dept. of
Romance Languages will hold its fifth
summer meeting on Wed., July 23, 7:30
p.m. in the Vaculty Lounge, Rm. 3050,
Frieze Bldg. The speaker will be Dr.
Angela Acuna de Chacon, Ambassador
of Costa Rica in the Organization of
American States. Her topic will be: "La
Muj)er en Hispano America." Open to
the public.
Linguistics Forum Lecture: Prof.
Henry Hoenigswald, Univ. of Penna., on
"Another Typological Glance at Indo-
European Phonology." Thurs., July 24,
7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Dr. Ralph D. Rabinovitch will be cpn-
sulting psychiatrist at the staff' clinic
Fri., July 25, at the U. of M. Fresh Air
Camp. 8.00 p.m.
Phi Delta Kappa will initiate new
members into the fraternity at a meet-
ing Wed., July 23, 7:30 p.m. in the E.
Conf. Rm. of the Rackham Bldg. Dr.
William A. Yeager, Prof. Emeritus,

"Changing 'Patterns in Educational
Administration."
Concerts
Student Recital Cancelled: The recital
by Russell Bedford, bassoonist, sched-
uled for Wed, evening,' July 23, at the
Rackham Assembly Hall, has been can-
celled.
Student Recital: Russell Reed,s tu.
dent of trumpet with Clifford Lilly.,
will present a. recital' on Thurs., July
24. 8:30 p.m. Aud. A, Angell Hall. He
will be assisted ' by Arthur Katterjoha
at th~e piano, and Gary Stollsteianer,
Paul Willwerth and Richard Longfield,
trumpets. His recital is presented in
partial fulfillment of the requirements
for the degree of Master of Music, and
included on the program will be works
by Honegger, Giannin, Vivaldi, Scheidt
and Peeters. Open to the public,
Academic Notices
Seminar in Mathematical Statistics
will meet Wed., July 23, 4:00-5:30 pan.
in Rm. 3201 Angell Hall. Prof. J. G. Weu-
del will speak on "On the Maximum
of Partial Sums."
Admission Test for Graduate Stud
in Business: Candidates taking the Ad-
mission Test for Graduate Study in
Business on July 26 are requested to
report to Room 130 Bus. Admiin. Bldg..
8:45 a.m., Sat.
Doctoral Examination for Musa Yu-
nis Hussayni. Bus. Admnin.; thesis:
"Corporate Profits and Venture Capi-
tal in the Postwar Decade," Wed., July
23, 816 Bus. Admin. Bldg., 1:30 p.m.
Chairman, W. A. Paton.
Doctoral Examination for Robert Lee
Isaacson, Psychology: thesis: "An Elec-
trographic Study of the Dog During
Avoidance Learning," Thurs., July 2,4,.
6625 Haven Hall, 10:00 a.m. Chairman,
E. L. Walker.
(Continued on Page 4)

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JAMES MACARIIJVR i CAROL LYNLEY
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