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July 23, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-07-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

s ecru

iize 'Summer Sky'

By GENNY LELAND
"I saw eternity the other night,
Like a great ring of pure and
. endless light,
All calm as it Was bright."
With this bit of poetry Prof.
Hazel M. Losh of the astronomy
department concluded an inf or-
mallecture on the "Summer Sky"
Friday night. The lecture was the
first of a series of three open
houses given by the department
in Angell Hall.
Prof. Losh gave a general talk
on the constellations, planets and
stars. Slides and star charts were
shown to supplement her talk and
to show the location of' the par-
ticular constellations.
Telescope Shown
When a picture of the antiquat-
ed telescope that Galileo of fif-
teenth century fame flashed on
the screen, Prof. Losh speculated
on what his reactions might have
been if he could see the telescopes
of today. The Student Observatory
on the fifth floor of Angell Hall
has two telescopes, one 200 inches
and the other 150 inches.
Prof. Losh told of some of the
ancient astronomers who wor-
shiped the sun and the moon.
From their observations, they were
able to tell, by the regular appear-
ance of these bodies, the time of
harvest and the flooding season of
the Nile River. Later, a daily time
system and a calendar were de-
vised from watching the move-
ments in the heavens, she said.
"The ancients believed that the
earth was the center of the uni-
verse," she explained. "It was Co-
pernicus in 853 A.D. who discov-
ered the earth was only very small
and the sun was part of another
and greater system."
The ancient Greeks discovered
forty-eight of the constellations.
It has only been since modern
tinies that the other forty have
been discovered, Prof. Losh con-
tinued.
Arabs Vest Eyesight
The ancient Arabs used to test
their, eyesight by looking at the
double star on thie big dipper, she
related. If theyhcould see both
stars, they had good vision.
Prof. Losh related some of the
ancient legends that came from
the star watchers. Qn a clear
night one can see Antares shoot-
ing ararrow at the heart of Scor-
pio. In the winter time one can
see Orion, the boastful hunter, be-
ing dealt the fatal sting from
Scorpio. It seems that Juno was
getting tired of hearing Orion
boast of his great hunting ability,
so she sent Scorpio after him.
Prof. Losh also described the
different colors of the stars. The
blue stars are higher in tempera-
ture than the red stars.
Sun is Average Star
Pictures were shown of the
Milky Way and the. sun, which,
she called- "Just an average star."
There are others much bigger and]

b

ANN

ARBOR

r

az

entire stock

Summ er Dresss
13 to ff0I
Prices drastically reduced for this money-saving com-
munity event! Choose from wonderful styles and fabrics
of the current season in dresses - now at a fraction of
their original price . .. just in time for your vacation,
and summer activities. Cottons, silks, linens, miracle
fabrics, laces, and novelties. Junior, misses and wom-
en's sizes in casual, afternoon, streetwear, and cocktail
dresses. Also maternities, including pedal pushers,
shorts and jackets.

ACCESSORI ES
HOSIERY 69c . . . 3pr.for2.00
orig. 1.15 to 1.65 a pair
Clearance of Nylon Hosiery from regular stock, broken
colors and sizes.
BELTS . .:. .550cto$2
Orig. 1.00 to 4.00. Leathers, straws and novelty fabrics;
darks and pastels. 24 to 30.
GLOVES . . . . . . . $1 to $3
Orig. 2.00 to 5.00. Cottons, nylons, sheers, leathers,
and string; darks and pastel tones.
NYLON KNIT STOLES. . $4.44
Orig. 8.98. Gift-perfectwhite cover-ups for cool summer
evenings. A very special Bargain Days price!
JEWELRY . . . . c and $1.00
Orig. $1 to $3. Summer pastels, white, colored and
rhinestone stone jewelry in gold and silver settings.
Beads, necklaces, bracelets, earrings, pins.
HANDBAGS $3
orig. $4 to $6
Clearance of summer handbags. Patents, plastics, vinyls
and straws. Untrimmed, flower trimmed, leather
trimmed.
Casual Dresses 6 to $15
A variety of fabrics and styles just in time for your
vacation and summer activities. Broken sizes.

-Daily-Al Erbe
STAR GAZERS--Two visitors at the astronomy department's open house view the planet Saturn
thirough the 150-inch telescope in the Student Observatory.
warmer, she continued. In one
constellation there are 100,000
stars brighter than the sui n.
Sidaes were also shoWp of the
planets Jupiter and Satu:n. The
rings of Saturn are meteorites'
and gasses revolving around the,
planet. Some of the ri~ags re-
volve.fastermthan other, which
differentiates each pf them.
After Prof. Losh's lecture the
audience was directed to the top
floor of Angell Hall to see the Stu-
dert Observatory and to. inspect
the telescopes and displays in the
adjoining room. The audiience was
able to see both Jupiter and Sat-
urn, which is 400 million miles
away from the earth.

spring and summer
Suits and- Coats

The displays included old tele-
scopes, pictures of stars and a set
of six scales which would tell the
weight of a person on.. the sun,
Jupiter, Mars, Vesta, the Moon
and Sirius, the dog star..
One woman seemed a little be-
wildered when she hopped on the
Sirius scale and weighed in at
5000 pounds. She went Saway, mut-
tering something about a sack
dress.

as muchas
off!

SPORTSWEAR

-Daily-Al Erbe
LOOK CLOSELY-The planet Saturn is admired from afar by
two guests at the open house. The famed rings hold a fascination
for one young fellow.

BLOUSES

r

$3

4

."s.
i

OSU SURVEY DISE LOSES:
Students Care Less About Immorality

COLUMBUS, 0. (P)-A survey
of today's college students discloses
they shoW less disapproval of im-
moral acts connected with sex than
any of their predecessors of the
past three decades.
The study just completed by two
psychiatric researchers at Ohio;
State University here shows, for
instance, that:
A man's desertion of an unwed
mother, which studeents of the past
30 years ranked high among the
"top 10 sins" of our times, has now
been relegated to last place on that
list.
Condemn Aduitry
Today's students, while still con-
demning premarital sex relations
and adultery, ,do so less strongly
than their predecessors.
However, divorce for incompati-
bility, where no children are in-'
volved, was acceptable to many
students of 1929 and 1939, yet it is
meeting wih growing rejection to
day.
Similarly, disbelief in God was
never strongly condemned by the,
surveyed students of previous dec-
ades. What disapproval there was
reached a low in 1939, but is now
rising.
Values Unstable
"Perhaps the most important
findings of this study," said its po-
directors, Drs. Solomon Rettig
and Benjamin Pasamanick, "is the
great lack of stability of many
moral values" and their apparent
change with economic and political
changes.
They note that 1939 students
represent the parents of today's
undergraduates-yet responses of
the groups differ.
Either parents aren't getting
across theirvalues to their chil-
dren or the parents have changed
too," said Dr. Pasamanick.
Judgements Conflict
The two researchers are inter-
ested, too, in the conflicting moral

Judgments represented in
dent replies.

the stu-1

"The least we can do is point
them out," they said, "and make
people think about thiem."
'i'heir findings were drawn from
anonymous responses to a 50-item
questionnaire by near'iy°'50 under-
graduates-204 men and 285 wo-
men.
Rightness Conipard
Student ratings.of moral acts or
specified situations, In degree of
"rightness or wrongness," were
then compared with studies of

three previous decades at other
m idwestern schools.
Students of all 'the decades sur-
veyed, with the exception of a 1939
study, regarded kidnaping and hit-
skip driving as the two worst mor-
al sins.
Showing the most consistent in-
crease in moral condemnation over
the period are suicide and "a doc-
tor allowing a badly deformed baby
to die."
Scientists see this as a growing
value for the sanctity of individual
.life.

- ;<- ---rnrz~zal

BARGAIN
DAYS
200o
OFF
All regular Stock of
Current Fiction
Nlon-Fiction
Children's Books
Stationery
Fountain Pens
Paperbacks
Many other items
Overbeck
Bookstore
1216 South University
NO 3-4436

5'Z$

~28 $34 5

FALL and WINTER COATS
Shining blacks, tweeds, and imported wools as.
much as half off! Misses, juniors and custom sizes.

$58

Cashmere Coats . .. 188
Originally $135
SHOES
Save on summer's smartest dress and casual shoes
at a fraction of their original prices. Navy, white,
beige, brown, two-tones, calf.

CAR COATS $8
orig. $14.98 Finger-tip length in floral designs,

I

orig. 4.98 orig. 5.98 orig. 7.98
Tailored shirts and soft blouses with roll-up or short sleeves. Drip-
dry cotton, dacron-cotton, silk, nylon; prints and solids in white and
lovely colors. Sizes 10 to 1 8.
Cotton Bermuda Shorts $4.90
orig. $7.98 to $8.98
Cotton tarpon, china or twill self-belted shorts. Variety
of plaids or solids, perfect for your vacation plans.
COTTON SKIRTS $6 $8
Harem drape, sheaths in linens, cottons, prints, solids.
GOLFER JACKETS 8
orig. 10.98
Action back golfer jacket, water repellent, waist length
in pastel shades.

'YOU Can't Lose

On These Values!
Telechron KITCHEN CLOCKS
,formerly 6.95 ... NOW 2.95
ALL ADDING MACHINES
AT REDUCED PRICES

LINGERIE

Caresso

Jocelli Carmo

I

MORRI LL'S

Capezio Joyce Fredelle
7.85
orig. 12.98 to 14.98
Mademoiselle, Katja 9.85
orig. 12.98 to 19.98
1. Miller, Customcraft 12.85
orig. 19.98 to 24.98

314S. State

NO 3-2481

i.
I
,.
.

NYLON TRICOT
GOWNS &SLIPS . . . . . $2
Special group of nylon lingerie in a beautiful selection
of colors and sizes.
NYLON TRICOT BRIEFS . $1.10
Lavishly trimmed with lace and embroidery. White,
pink or blue; small, medium, large.
3 pr. for 3.0
NYLON TRICOT SLIPS. *.$3.99
Orig. 5.98. Lovely lace and embroidery trimmed slips by
Luxite; sizes 32 to 40.f
PATIO FROCKS . . . * . $7
Orig. 9.98. Sleeveless cotton patio frock to be comfort-
able in all day,

----

SHOE BARGAINS
Summer and Spring DRESS SHOES
Value to $13.95
$5 and $6

Town & Country.
orig. 8.98 to 12.98

S685

FOUNDATIONS

COTTON PAJAMAS

# +t , 2

Coeds:
WW A T" C "n1 7 U w T A-I

Keddelle and Su'mmerettes reg. to $4.95

:$2.00
oily $1, $2 $3

Clearance of cotton and nylon bras in broken sizes.'
BRAS $3 to $7

Cot ton pojamas in Berrnudas and Baby Doll length
Flower prints.

Sample Shoes 4B and 41/2

i

I # -..I . I r t ,

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