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July 29, 1958 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-07-29

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TIlE MICMIGAN DAILY PA

Zussia Scores

Track

in

d.

.S. Athlete Sets World,
ark in Decathlon Event

('9,

MOSCOW (AW - Rafer Johnson,
a lithe California giant, drove to
a world record in the decathlon
yesterday with a staggering show
of athletic might. Despite this the
Soviet Union scored an eyelash
172-170 track and field victory
over the United States.
The Russians a l r e a d y had
clinched their slender triumph in
the international track meet when
the 6-3, 200-pound Tarzan from
Los Angeles lumbered across the
finish line in the 1,500-meter race
-the tenth and final test of a
rigorous two-day grind.
Locked in a bitter battle with
the great Russian star, Vasily
Kuznetsov, Johnson climaxed the
historic meet by scoring 8,302
points. It was one of the great all-
around athletic performances of
modern times.
Johnson held the listed world,
record of 7,985 points, but this
had been bettered by Kuznetsov,
who had piled up 8,013 points this
spring. Kuznetsov finished yester-
day with 7,897.°
Resounding Ovation
Some 50,000 Russian spectators
stood and gave Johnson a re-
sounding ovation as he strolled to
the victory stand while the band
blared "The Star Spangled Ban-
ner."
The big athlete was breathing
heavily but smiling broadly as he
received his award.
As anticipated, the AmericanY
men athletes soundly defeated
their Russian rivals in points,
126-109, but failed to make up
ground lost to the hardier, more
athletically inclined Soviet wo-
men. The Russian women won
63-44.
Total Scoring;
U. S. officials sought to have
the men's and women's competi-
tions scored separately. But they
were voted down by the Soviet
sponsors who insisted the meet be
scored as one event.'
Points were given on the basis=
of 5 for a victory and 3-2-1 for
the other three places. The stand-
ard procedure for scoring dual
meets is 5-3-1 with no points for
losing relay teams. Under this sys-
tem, the Americans would have
won' 138-137.
The Yanks' hopes of winning
the first big private athletic battle

with Russia were punctured by a
substandard performance in the
high jump and javelin. But Amer-
icans produced surprises in several
events - including the women's
shot put and the men's 5,000-
meter run.
In the 5;000, a rugged test con-j
ceded to the Russians, Bill Del-
linger of Neah Bay, Wash., ran
toe-to-toe with Russia's Peter Vo-
lotnikov and finally lost by only
half a foot. They were given iden-
tical clocking - 14 minutes, 28.4a

Tigers Edge
Red Sox, 5-4
In Halted Play
DETROIT ()-Lefty Leo Kiely
put an end to a weird, rain-delayed
struggle yesterday when he walked
across the winning run in the
ninth inning and enabled the
Detroit Tigers to edge Boston 5-4.
A downpour delayed play for one
hour and nine minutes after Kiely
had two out and one on in the
ninth inning. Play was halted with
a 3-ball, no-strike count on Tiger
center fielder Harvey Kuenn.
When play was resumed, Kiely
walked Kuenn, yielded a dribbling
single down the third-base line by
Al Kaline and, then got a 3-2
count on Charlie Maxwell before.
forcing in the winning run with
an inside pitch.
The Red Sox did all their scor-
ing in the fifth inning against Al
Cicotte, making his first start since
the Tigers recalled him from their
Charleston farm club.

seconds.

Wins Shot Put

Mrs. Earlene Brown, the 220-
pound Los Angeles housewife, sur-
prised the Russians by '"winning
the women's shot put with a ti-
tanic heave of 54 feet, 3 '1/3
inches, This was the best perform-
ance ever by an American in the
event.

HARVEY KUENN
...long wait

AL BATTING LEAD:
Cerv Swells Average on Oriole Pitching

NEW YORK (P)-Big Bob Cerv
of Kansas City, who suffered a
fractured jaw May 16 and could.
not eat solid foods for more than
a month, fattened up on Baltimore
pitching over the weekend to take
the exciting competition.

STAN MUSIAL
.. leadsNL

ollege Football Coaches
:all Pro Draft Unfair

Pete Runnels of Boston, last
week's leader, went hitless in five
tries and Sunday and fell into a
fourth place tie with Nellie Fox of
Chicago at .324.
Cerv has turned in a most cour-
ageous performance in his eighth
season in the majors. His fracture
was the result of a plate collision.
Bob was sidelined for 10 days and
then played with his jaw wired
until June 17. The 31-year-old
right-handed batter was acquired
from the New York Yankees Oct.
16, 1956.
Power moved up one notch to
second place at .326. Goodman
dropped to third with a .325 mark.
The White Sox third baseman had
only two hits in 14 trips last week.
In the National League, Willie
Mays bf San Francisco picked up
10 points on pace-setting Stan
Musial of St. Louis.
Musial, seeking his eighth bat-
ting title, had nine hits in 31 at
bats and slumped seven points to
.354. Mays climbed three points
to .347 with an 8-for-20 showing.
Musial led by 17 points a week
ago.
Richie Ashburn of Philadelphia
had seven safeties in 17 trips to
take over third place at .331. Bob
Skinner of Pittsburgh advanced to.
fourth with a .500 effort 13-for-26
that lifted his mark to .328.
Pittsburgh's Frank Thomas
moved into undisputed possession
over the American League batting
lead with a .330 average.
The Athletics' star outfielder
collected seven hits in the three
games against the Orioles and
moved past Cleveland's Vic Power
and Chicago's Billy Goodman in
of the senior circuit's home run
lead.
Chicago's Ernie Banks, however,
DIAL'NO 8-6416
. Ends Tonight *
"W OMAN
OF
ROME"
with
LOLLABRIGI DA

wrested the runs batted in lead
from Thomas. Ernie drove in seven
runs and Thomas only five. Their
season's totals are Banks 80 and
Thomas 79.
Jackie Jensen of Boston re-
mained on top in the American
League home run and RBI races.
He has 29 circuit blows and 891
runs batted in. Jackie hit one
homer and scored six runners last
week.
Major Leagfue
Stan'dings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
New York 63 32 .663 -
Boston 48 46 .511 14/
Baltimore 47 46 .505 15
Chicago 46 50 .479 171,
Kansas City 44 48 .478 171
Cleveland 46 52 .469 18%4
Detroit 44 51 .463 19
Washington 42 55.433 22 j
TODAY'S GAMES.
Boston at Detroit (N) - Sullivan
(8-4) vs. Bunning (8-7).
New York at Kansas City (N)-
Larsen (7-4) vs. Terry (6-8).
Baltimore at Cleveland (N) -
Pappas (7-3) vs. Narleski (10-8).
Washington at Chicago (N)
Kemmerer (5-8) vs. Donovan (7-10).
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Milwaukee 52 41 .559 -
San Francisco 51 42 .548 1
Chicago 48 49 .495 6
Cincinnati 46 48 .489 V!',
Pittsburgh 46 48 ..489 6
St. Louis 45 48 .484 7
Philadelphia 42. 46 .477 71li
Los Angeles 43 51 .457 9;a
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at Milwaukee (N) --
Drysdale (4-10) vs. Jay (6-3).
San Francisco at Cincinnati (N)
--Miller (3-5) or Monzant (6-8) vs.
Lawrence (6-7).
Chicago at Pittsburgh (N)--Briggs
(4-0) vs. Friend (12-11).
St. Louis at Philadelphia (N, pre-
ceded by completion of suspended
game) - Brosnan (7-7) vs. Hearn
(1-3) (suspended game), Jones
(8-7). vs. Cardwell (0-0) (regular
game.)

STAY WITH IT, WtR.EY!
MICHIGAN DAILY iSRA
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISNG in
RATES Po
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .80 2.00 296 Elz
3 .96 2.40 3.55 Tho
4 1.12 2.80 4.14
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Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily. Ale
Phone NO 2-3241 chit
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MEN'S short sleeve sport shirts $1.25.
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ROOM AND BOARD
Room and/or Board
Summer Rates
Good food
Good location
Linen furnished C
1319 Hill, Mr. Wentz. NO 2-6422 E2 ,
E29
ROOMS FOR men, kitchen privileges,
wonderful beds, near campus and
stores. NO 2-5152. )E36
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double. Cooking. 517 E. Ann, NO
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BUSINESS'SERVICES _6
LINOLEUM, wall tile, shades, venetian
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Brothers, 320 E. Liberty. NO 3-6725.
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)J176
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Black long hair male cat named
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3665 anytime. )A168
Read
Daily
Classifieds

WASHINGTON (AP)--Three top-
llege poaches yesterday kicked
on pro football's draft. They
lled it unfair to the players and
d it's not true that the pros
ed it to survive.
Oklahoma's Bud Wilkinson, one
the three who testified before
nate sports investigators, said
gardless of the draft only players
rare ability should undertake
e professional game. .
Finance Education.
Either those, Wilkinson told the
nate Antimonopoly subcommit-
e, or athletes with a definite goal
io play for pay in order to
ance education.
'Beyond that," Wilkinson said,
nyone 'who plays is making a
d mistake."
Wilkinson, who has directed
:lahoma to three national col-
date championships, was the
st to blast the National Football
ague's draft. Then came Duffy
ugherty of Michigan State and
wden Wyatt of Tennessee. Each
aches a different style of offense
t each three the same kind of
tack on the system whereby NFL
ibs gain exclusive bargaining
:hts for designated collegians.
They declare it prevents young
n from marketing their talent

for the highest price. They also
disagreed with the contention of
NFL Commissioner Bert Bell and
other advocates that pro football
needs the draft to equalize team
strengths.
Impossible Appraisal
In essence, they argued it's al-
most impossible to appraise col-
legians accurately . . . there's too
little difference in the ability or
potential of college players . . .
there are too few vacancies each
year for any one club to buy up
the best players and create a
monopoly in football skill.
All three coaches opposed House-
passed legislation to give pro foot-
ball, baseball, basketball and
hockey sweeping exemptions from
the antitrust laws. They said pro-
fessional sports are businesses and
saw no reason for special treat-
ment.
-

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Sets a new high in suspense"
-N.Y. Daily News

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