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July 12, 1957 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-07-12

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FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1957

TIIE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGEa

$ M A Y U Y 1 , 1 5 H 1 H E A A

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UNITED NATIONS COMMAND:

U.S. Jets Herald Korean Arms Step-up

By HUGH A. MULLIGAN
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
Flights of supersonic F-100 jets
have begun streaking over South
Koreaas the opening step in the
arms modernization program un-
dertaken by the United Nations
command to offset a four-year
arms build-up by Communist
forces in North Korea.
The UN command informed the
Communists June 21 that it no
longer feels bound by the arms
provisions of the Korean truce
because of "flagrant, repeated and
willful violations" north of the
38th parallel.
The decision provoked predict-
able outcries from the North
Korean commander, Maj. Gen.
Chung Kook Rook, and from Pei-
ping and Moscow, but the UN
brushed aside Red demands for an
international conference to discuss
s the situation.
The 1953 armistice, which ended
the three-year war in Korea, pro-
vided that neither side could in-
troduce new weapons, planes or
munitions, and 'specified replace-
ment of worn-out equipment was
to be on a "piece by piece" basis.
Fighters Moved
The ink had hardly dried on the
contract when UN radar screens
began picking up flights of Red
fighter planes into North Korea
from Manchuria.
The decision to abandon the
Korean arms agreement, while
abiding by the rest of the truce,
comes at a time when the United
States is attempting to negotiate
a disarmament agreement with
Russia at the London talks.
Whether the timing of the
Korean move was intentional or
accidental, it served as a bitter
reminder of how the Communists
have kept faith on the arms agree-'
- ment- in Korea.
According to the best available
information, the Republic of
Korea has a well trained army of
700,000 men in 21 divisions, second
largest in the free world.
It is undoubtedly capable of
giving a better account of itself
than did the, poorly trained
Korean army of 100,000 that was
overrun so quickly in 1950.
North Korean commander Chung
challenges these figures and claims.
that since the end of the war the
ROKs have increased their army
from 16 to 31 divisions."
Troops Ready
The United States has about
80,000 troops in' Korea, including
the 7th,.and 24th divisions which
man a sector of the truce line
north and northeast of Seoul and
the equivalent of two divisions of
supply troops in the vicinity of
Pusan.
Associated Press foreign corres-
pondent Dan Baldwin, who made a
10-day tour of the truce line last
month, reported that the two in-
fantry divisions were only at 60
to 80 per cent of normal strength.
"All but one of the frontline
regiments," le added, "are actu-
ally miles fom the front, now
weathered and overgrown with
weeds in almost. four years of
suspended combat. This regiment
is located north of the Imjin River
above Seoul and in event of attack
would have to pull back. The
others would take from one to
three hours to reach battle posi-
tions."
Sixteen Signed
Of the 16 nations who signed
the Korean truce only eight be-
sides the" United States have con-
tributed troops to the UN com-
mand.
These total less than 5,000.
Countries represented include the
United Kingdom, New Zealand,
Australia, Canada, Greece, Turkey,
Thallandand the Philippines.
Australia has served notice that
she intends to remove her troops
from truce line duty and the
United Kingdom plans to cut the

number of her troops in Korea.
Only Turkey has kept a garrison
of promised strength.
In all, the United Nations com-
mand has about 785,000 troops in
South Korea. This compares with
800,000 at the end of the war, but
the weapons are old and have not
been replaced.
The United NationsETAOIN
The UN has 150 Sabrejets which
will be replaced by supersonic
F-100s, capable of carrying nuclear
bombs, as step one in the arms
build up.
On the opposite side of the line,
the North. Koreans have a re-
organized and re-equipped 400,000
man army and the Chinese Com-
munists have 350,000.
Chung Challenges
Chung also challenges this,
claiming that since the war the
Chinese Reds have withdrawn
some 19 divisions from North
Korea.
The South Koreans, in rebuttal,
claim that the discharged men
have been enrolled in the armed
coastal defense corps or forced to
work in mines and factories in
North Korea.
In addition, there are an esti-
mated one million Chinese troops
across the border in Manchuria.
Counting the garrison in Man-

._...

_

Esiated One
IMillion Red Troops
Iii~i :InManchuria
.r: :eii£:it £i£ ~
= ii ~:l? ~ 1ANcHURIA "t1'2.iii Di
x'32£2: £i

Hi
ted 300 Prop
P lanes

It

Garrison of 350,000
Red Chinese Troops
500 Jets of Which
250Oare new MIG-17s
yiA or TI-28 Bombers
1,672 Artillery ieces
Added Since War, May
Have Atomic Cannon
450 Old and 340"
New Tanks
NO RRTH KOREA
3
Garrison of 400,000
North Korean Troops
U.S..7th and 24th
Inf. Divisions Man OK "Army of
Part of Truce Line A 21 Divisions
Seoul
US. Moving in F-lOOs KO
to Replace Sabrejets.
One Wing at Osan.
Troops of Eight
tOther U.N. Nations R s. or in
Total About 5,000 JSupply Units
St s
UU.N. Has Not F
nModernized Guns
'c v
orwTanks Since r
N AP Nowsfeatures ....***... .

x

Research
Progresses
Ont Aphasia
Research recently completed
under the supervision of Prof. H.
Harlan Bloomer of the Univer-
sity's Speech Clinic has brought
the mysteries of "childhood apha-
sia" a little closer to being solved.
Speech experts have teen stym-
ied for years in their search for
causes of 'childhood aphasia" or
language delay.
Prof. Louis Lerea of Northern
Illinois State College tested up to
245 children during the past year
with his own test, which is based
on picturable items of the Charles
Fries Scheme of Structural Lin-
guistics.
The test is aimed at classifying
the various areas of speech fail-
ure in an attempt at locating a
method of determining the par-
ticular causes.
One important finding was the
relationship Prof. Lerea found be-
tween expression and comprehen-
sion in the brain; injured group.
In this group, he found both
comprehension and expression on
an equal scale, while in the other
language delay groups such as
mental retardation, emotional dis-
turbances, and deafness. compre-
hension always exceeds expres-
sion.
One of the tests used was a spe-
cially devised hearing test based
on familiar sounds.
After diagnosis of the cause is
completed, instruction and train-
ing of the child will be needed.
When patterns and relationships
among language retarded are fi-
nally found then researchers can
attempt methods of treatment to
fit the disability.
The research was made pos-
sible by $10,000 of the $300,000
legislative grant earmarked for re-
search in human resources at Mi-
chigan during 1956-57.
Kauper Heads
Commission
The current exhibition at the
University Historical Collections
contain a wide display of student
publications ranging back to the.
mid-eighteenth century.
Included are annuals; pictorial,
humor, opinion and literary maga-
zines; newspapers and profes-
sional. school reviews..
Earliest of the publications were
the first and only two numbers of
the "Peninsular Quarterly," 1853,
which was edited, by J. Sterling
Morton.
Morton was later to become
Governor of the Territory of Ne-
braska, Secretary of Agriculture
and founder of Arbor Day.

LINES.
2
3
4

I DAY
.75
.90
1.04

3 DAYS
1.87
2.25
2.60

Figure 5 average words to a fine.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily. 11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241

ALTERATIONS
DRESSMAKER
Alterations, Restyling
334 S. State St. NO 3-6612
)Pl
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HI FI
Speakers
Bozak, AR-1, Electro-Voice, Lansing

*EIhiEri

Amplifiers &
Fisher, Sherwood, Scott,

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

6 DAYS
2.78
3.33
3.85

Tuners
McIntosh, Rel

Kits
Dynakit, Eico, Arkay, Aqtdax
Recorders
Viking, Berlant, Belt
Turntables
Rek-O-Kut, Connoisseur, Garrard, Presto
Visit our Hi Fi Showrooms for a
stereo demonstration
Audio Supply Laboratories
334 Nickels Arcade
(Above Bay's Jewelry)
NO 2-7767 NO 2-9425
)X4
RARE VIOLINS
AND BOWS
ALL ACCESSORIES, STRINGS,
REPAIRS
MADDY MUSIC
508 E. Williams
NO 3-3223
)X5
HIF1 STUDIO
An amazing inventory of I Pt
components available to you at
catalogue price.
KITS
We stock amplifier, AM-FM tuner,
and speaker enclosure kits in sev-
eral brands.
HI FI SERVICE
Our engineers and technicians are
fully competant and equipped to
service all equipment we sell, and
to advise you on the selection of
components.
1217 & 1317 So. University
NO 2-9595
)X2
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds
...FIRST...
In Modern Comfort
.,. .FIRST .
In Air-Conditioning
. FIRST,..
In New Hair Styling
4 X It &ber4
715 North University

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
Record Sale
Overstock 12" L.P.'s
$3.98 and $4.98 values, only $2.98.
Major labels represented
205 E. Liberty Phone NO 2-0675
211 S. State Phone NO 8-9013
LIBERTY MUSIC SHOPS
Closed Sat. at 1 P.M. during July-Aug.
)X3
PERSONAL
READING THE Sat. Eve. Post? We can
get it for you wholesale. Student
Periodical, NO 2-3061. )F6
PHOTO SUPPLIES
Exposure Meter Value
THE "METAR" '
with Booster Cell & Cases
Reg. $14.95 NOW $9.9
THE QUARRY INC.
320 So. State St. NO 3-1991
)D3
NEW
ARGUS C-3 Camera, with
case and flash, Reg.
$69.50 Now $49.95
Purchase from
Purchase
Camera Shop
1116 S. University Phone NO 8-6972
)D6
FOR SALE.
SHORT SLEEVE sport shirts. $1.75, 2
for $3.00. Washable. Assorted colors.
SAM'S STORE
Phone NO 3-8611
122 East Washington
)B2
ROOM AND BOARD
SUMMER ACCOMMODATIONS avail-
able at law fraternity for all stu-
dents. T.V. and cool rooms. $1.00 per
day. On Hill and Forest. Call Don
Dodge at NO 2-5614. )E5
TWO MEALS, 12 per day, five days a
week - Mon. - Fri. Call Bill Powell,
at Phi Kappa Tau, corner Hill and
Tappan. NO 3-8581. )E2
FOR RENT
COMPLETELY FURNISHED. apartment
for single woman near campus. Avail-
able August for one year. Phone aft-
ernoons or early evenings. NO 2-5779.
)C20
YOUNG WOMAN to share three room
apt., summer or permanent. Near
campus. Automatic washer. Call NO 5-
5919 after five. )C19
COOL CAMPUS apartments, some
rooms. 514 S. Forest. Call NO 2-1443.
)C9
VACANCY FOR one girl to share with
two girls five room apartment-(two
bedrooms, living room, study room,
kitchen, T V.). One, block from cam-
pus. $40 for entire summer. If inter-
ested,.contact Mrs. Domm, NO 2-1290
or Gerry Laube, NO 3-8843 or NO 3-
0975. )C13

PETS AND SUPPLIES
TROPICAL FISH aquariums and sup-
plies, Hamsters, Parakeets, etc.
UNIVERSITY AQbARIUM
328 East Liberty N03-0224
(Open daily except Thursday)
)T1
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
EUROPEAN CARS
We service all foreign cars.
303 Ashley NO 5-5800
)S6
TIRE SALE
Prices slashed
Big trade-in for used tires
Fully Guaranteed
GOLDEN'S SERVICE
featuring STANDARD Products
601 Packard -- NO 8-9429
C-TED STANDARD SERVtOE
Friendly service is our business. At-
las tires, batteries and accessories.
Warranteed & guaranteed. See us for
the best price on new & used tires.
Road service - mechanics on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get ita
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168 }S}
TRANSPORTATION
SPECIAL WEEKEND RATE
for Avis Rent a Car
from Friday, 5 P.M. to Monday 9 A.M.
$10 plus $.08 a mile
gas, oil and insurance furnished.

12, nearly new. Reasonable.
Rent ACar
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4156

St.
)G2

The greatest imbalance, how-
ever, is in combat quality.
The Communists have ignored
the ban on new weapons, shipping
in 1,672 new artillery pieces, 340
tanks in addition to the 480 they
already had, and 500 jet and 300
prop-driven planes. The jets in-
clude 250 MIG17s, later model in-
terceptors than the MIG15 which
lost the battle of the skies to our
Sabrejets during the war.
Airfields Built
The Reds also have built or re-
built 38 airfields. There have been

recurrent reports that they possess
atomic cannons with a range of 15
to 20 miles, manned by Soviet
technicians.
Pentagon officials said the res-
toration of the Korean arms bal-
ance applies only to U.S. forces at
present. But Assistant Secretary of
Defense Murray Robinson said
"some modernization" of ROK
forces is contemplated.
Robinson said the United States
will begin moving in planes of
atomic capability immediately but

there are no present plans for
supplying ground forces with
atomic weapons or missile support,
as. Defense Secretary' Wilson had
hinted earlier. Wilson insists, how-
ever, that no weapons have been
banned."

BUSINESS SERVICES
TEACHER DESIRES baby-sitting ap-
pointments on week nights. Refer-
ences available if desired. Contact
G. L., 4051 Stockwell Hall, NO 3-1561.
)J8,
TYPING - Reasonable rates. Thebes,
term papers, etc. 830 S. Main. Call NO
8-7590, )J6
GOLF LESSONS. Private Instruction.
$3.00 per lesson. All points of the
game taught. Call NO 8-9052 between
5 and 6 P.M. daily. )J4
EXPERIENCED TYPIST with diserta-
tions term papers, etc. All work done
on electric typewriter. Call NO 2-7605.
)J7
WASHINGS - Also ironing separately.
Specialize in cotton blouses and
washed skirts. Free pick up and de-
livery. Phone NO 2-9020. )JI
HELP WANTED
FEMALE STUDENTS earn $10 partici-
pating in psychological experiment.
Nine hours required. Must have Thurs-
day mornings free. Phone NO 3-1511.
Ext. 2864. . )H14
ANN ARBOR
EMPLOYERS PERSONNEL
504 First National Bldg.
NO 5-6107
WANTED MEN AND WOMEN. Work ac-
cording to own schedule. Good in-
come potential, besides work you'll .
be sure to enjoy if you like meeting
people. Interview held Mon.-Fria from
4-6 at 1309 S. University, room 3.
)Hl
USED CARS-
1956 OLDSMOBILE
Holiday Hardtop, 9 months old, 18,000
miles. In excellent condition. Call NO.
5-1723 between 5:30 and 8 p.m.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Much needed key case June 27.
Identification perhaps illegible. Phone
number changed. Please call NO 5-
3628. Thank /you. )A3

b A

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:v:

Who Cares if It's Raining'

r,
r

" a You're sn
4 shine in th
' of cotton
..lining . .
beige and
Dozer

mart in rain
is all campus c
poplin with p
white, ma
checks. $10.9

Longer versio
July sale price
$14.95
ns of other Rair

or
oat
laid
ize,
5..
n
d.
or
on-
eds
E
*O
0
>35

0

MEN'S

CLIP OUT AND MAIL
HANDY CLASSIFIED FORM

WASHABLE
OXFORDS'

Store Hours:
9:30 to 5:30
Monday thru
Saturday

f
f
{4
f
x
S
i
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Shine coats of cott
rayons - failles - twe
Solids - checks.
JULY
CLEARANCE
Priced $10.00,
$14.95 and $18.0
Originally were to $

MICHIGAN DAILY
420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.
Please find enclosed $ for which you are to publish the following
classified ad for three consecutive days. (Use pencil and print each word
clearly.)
(2 LINES MINIMUM)
$1.87
$2.25
$2.60
$2.95
Dates the ad is to runl (no Monday paper)

I

I.

, ,mm ric uppers, airy and coo! I

I I

1

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