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July 12, 1957 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-07-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T8E MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1957

AT 'KELSEY MUSEUM:
Egyptian Ruins Yield ilistoric Glass
Excavations by the University's " :^^.? ,l ! ,..;;;?{,::::; ;:: ''''' ' .+rs' ; °'; ::: i.f' :.,' " 'f
exedtin o Egypt have un-
covered eo many interesting glass;
specimens now on display in the
Kelsey M useum . " ...::.. ::;:>.:: :.::::::::: :::::::::
Th xii-Ancient Egytia .............
Gass"-is a result o diggings <
around te ru ins ot f the tw f~
Karanis and in partiula arun
one late third century house.
Egypt wa he center of glass .:
makng n aciet ti'mes and glass
may have been invented there. :::s" :;:::;::' ,
The glass blowers of modern ' . ;;:>fs
Egypt still produce glass in many ...: :' st~r:r.xr.< 1::
colors.

A case devoted to mosaic glass
displays some fine samples prob-
ably made at Alexandria in the
first century A.D.
Venetian glass makers imitated
this ancient glass long afterwards
and the Italians gave it the name
"Millefiori," which means 1,000
flowers. Mosaic glass was used for
inlay, vases, and small ornaments.
Another. case shows decay in
glass.
While ancient glass was fusible
at a lower temperature it was
nevertheless more likely to decay.
Ancient glass has survived in
Egypt better than in other coun-
tries because it was usually buried
in dry desert rather than in damp
earth.
A collection of glass lamps is
also on display.
When in use the lamps were
partly filled with water. Oil was
added and it floated on the water.
The wick; in turn, floated in the
oil.
The lamps were set on tripods
or hung from the ceiling.
These glass lamps have con-
tinued to remain in use in Egypt
to modern times, especially for
lighting churches and mosques.,
A case ' devoted to perfume
bottles includes a number of tall
green bottles, often called "un-
guentaria."
These were used in all part of
the Roman Empire from one to
four A.D. They held perfumed oil
used after the public bath.
One of the most interesting
pieces in the display is a small
blue clear glass bottle, Enoch E.
Peterson, who directed the exca-
vations in Egypt indicated. He
offered a prize to the native work-
men at Kiranis, for the first whole
piece of clear blue glass brought
to him. But none of them ever
found any.
Exhibits of the excavations are'
open to the public at Kelsey Mu-
seum, open from 1 to 5 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday, and 3 to 5
p.m. Sundays,
cU' Students
Win Awards
In Advertising
Lawrence H. Doyle, '57BAd, and
Fred S. Steingold, '57, recently
were given awards in the second
annual Harry Suffrin "Scholar-
ship in Advertising" competition.
Doyle won a total of $1,000 for
capturing first honors in "mer-
chandise," "service" and "dress
right" categories.
Steingold won $250 in the "insti-
tutional" category.

-Daily-Eric Arnold
ANCIENT EGYPTIAN GLASS - Examples of glass specimens
derived from University excavations in Egypt are on display in the
Kelsey Museum.'
LEGISLATURE:
Tax StudySOes Off
Williams-Conlin Row

DAILY
OFFICIAL
DULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
1
piter and Saturn, Children welcomed,
but must be accompanied by adult&.
Foreign Language Program: Public
Lecture: Prof. Emma Birkmaier of the
University of Minnesota will give the
third lecture in this series speaking
on: "Current Problems in the Teach-
ing of Foreign Languages." Wed., July
17, at 4:10 p.m. Room 429, Mason Hall,
Publi nvited.
Plays
Moliere's The School for Wives, sec-
ond play on the Department of Speech
Summer Playbill, will be presented at
8 p.m. tonight in the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
Academic Notices
French Table: Every Tuesday noon in
the South Room of the Michigan Union
Cafeteria, those wishing to speak French
will meet for lunch.
Placement Notices}
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
LUCAS COUNTY CHILD WELFARE
BOARD, Toledo, Ohio, is interested in
Social Case Workers with M.S.W. de-
grees.
CITY OF KALAMAZOO, MICH., has
an opening for a City Planning Techni-
cian and for a Laboratory Technician.
The city is interested in graduates in
Personnel - Industrial Relations, Pub.
Admin., Acctg., Civil E. and Landscape
Arch.
CITY OF BIRMINGHAM, MICH., needs
graduates is LS&A, Pub. Admin., Bus-
Ad., and Civil E.
FLINT CIVIL SERVICE. Mich., has a
need for Civil Engrs. and Chemists.
From time to time there. are also open-
ings for people in non-technical fields.
U. S. DEPAFTMENT OF INTERIOR,
(fish and Wildlife Service) is inter-
ested in employing a Civil Engineer at
the GS-9 level. Headquarters would be
in Atlanta, Georgia.
SAN DIEGO CIVIL SERVICE COMM.,
Calif., is looking for an Assistant Crim-
inalist for the San Diego. Police Dept.
Requires a college graduate with major
work done in Criminalistics or related.
field. The city also needs a Social Ser-
vice Representative with a Master's
degree in Psych., Soc., Social Work and
one year of experience in counseling,
group therapy, etc.
For furtheryinformation contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 3371.
Organization
Notices
Cercle Francais: A Bastille Day cele-
bration for all French students, fac-
ulty and local French colony will be
held Sunday, July 14, at a private resi-
dence. Persons speaking French and
desirous of joining the group should
call the French Dept. (ext. 406) or
Professor O'Neill (ext. 2181) for infor-
mation.
Hillel: All day picnic. For informa-
tion anid reservations call NO 3-5129.
Date held: July 14.
Newman Club: Square Dance, July
12, 8:00 to 12:00 p.m. at Newman Cen-
ter. Refreshments.
Read the Classifieds

Gobs

Sail

NIOC Ships
North, South
For 6 Wees
Many of the students enrolled
in the University's NROTC cur-
riculum are now at sea in one
of two summer cruises.
"Charley" cruise, for contract
students (those who go to sea
once in four years), is sailing to
Boston and then to parts of Que-
bec for the summer.
Students on that voyage will
have the opportunity to see Mon-
treal
"Baker" cruise, for regular stu.
dents (those who sail three sum-
mers during their four years) has
left for Valparaiso, Chile, for an
eight-day stopover.
Following the South American
jaunt, the unit will move to Pana.
ma and Cuba, where one of last
year's cruises traveled. While in
Chile, however, the sailors will be
able to see Santiago and will have
the opportunity to fly across the
Andes.
Both units participated in the
Jamestown naval review last
month before embarking to the
foreign lands.
Life on board ship, the mid-
shipmen say, is as interesting as
the foreign ports-but much more
work.
Regular schedules and class lec-
tures, along with unannounced
drills, fill a good part of their
work days. The afternoons, how-
ever, often schedule some time
for sunbathing.
The iajor complaint on last
summer's trip was the heat-con-
stantly over 90 degrees in the
Panama area. Tarpaulins had to
be used to cover the ship as pro-
tecton from the heat for its
decks.
The trip through the canal-
an eight-hour journey-is a high-
light of the cruise.
Short stays in Panama and Cu-
ba provide some night life and
social life for the sailors.

}

for

;c

:,y

Summer

LANSING (-The chairman of
a republican-controlled legislative
tax study committee said yester-
day he is ready to start the study
on his own, without the help of
Gov. G. Mennen Williams.
In a letter to the governor, Rep.
Band Concert
Will Conclude
Annual Meet
A Summer Session Band Concert
on the diag at 7:30 p.m. Thursday
will be a highlight of the ninth
annual National Band Conductors
Conference.
The conference will begin Wed-
nesday when about 450 school
band conductors will hear a re-
cital at 9 a.m. by the Chicago
Symphony Brass Ensemble in Au-
ditorium A, Angell Hall. That eve-
ning the Michigan Woodwind
Quintet will give a recital in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall at 8:30 p.m.
Guest band conductors will be:
Harold Bachman, University of
Florida; Charles Minelli,. Univer-
sity of Ohio; Ronald D. Gregoty,
Indiana University; and Robert L.
Arthur, University of Pittsburgh.
Prof. William D. Revelli, direc-
tor of University Bands, Prof.
George Cavender, Assistant Direc-
tor of University Bands will be in
charge.
Eugene Carrington of Allied
Radio Corp. will lecture on "The
How and Why of Stereophonic
Sound" at 9 a.m. Thursday in the
League Ballroom.
Dalman Opperman, authority
on clarinet reed making, and Prof.
William Stubbins of the School of
Music will discuss "The Clarinet
and the Art of Clarinet Reed
Making" Friday in Rm. 128, Harris
Hall.
Wednesday and Thursday read-
ing sessions on new band litera-
tuic will be held in the League
Ballroom, headquarters for the
conference.

Rollo G. Conlin (R-Tipton) said
he would call a meeting of the
committee within 10 days to. get
the study underway.
Rep. Conlin and Gov. Williams
have been in sharp disagreement
on just how the study should be
conducted.
The committee chairman said
he would appoint a citizen's ad-
visory committee to aid in the
study and also planned to hire a
tax analyst to direct the research.
Gov. Williams was invited to
join in the project by recommend-
ing appointments to the citizens'
group but Rep. Conlin made it
clear he intended to run his own
show.
The governor had contended
that any citizens' group should
take charge of the survey with the
legislative committee playing a
secondary role.
Rep. Conlin was just as firm in
insisting that the committee run
its own project with the citizens'
group serving in an advisory ca-
pacity.
"I sincerely hope you do not
choose to remain aloof for partisan
reasons," Rep. Conlin wrote the
governor. "Our committee is bi-
partisan and we intend to proceed
in as fair and just a manner as
possible for the benefit of all the
people of Michigan."
The governor had hinted he
might appoint his own citizens'
committee to survey the tax situ-
ation if he was unable to reach
agreemeent with Conlin.

HIGH-LINE STATION-Sailors prepare to send man between U.S.S. NEWPORT NEWS - A
ships for communication. The cargo?-movie films for the night's view of the ship that carried
show. Films are exchanged regularly between ships. students to Panama last year.

DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Photographs by
RICHARp
GASKI LL

THE SHIPS GO BY-Visitors were rare and often
unusual, like the flying fish who flew over the
ship in the Florida area.

READY FOR ACTION - Unnanounced drills
might be called at any hour of the day Or night,
"Abandon Ship" or "Fire Stations."

for your eating pleasure...
PIZZA at the Del Rio
BEER - WI NE -also takeout

122 W. Washington

Closed Tuesday

I r i

i
ti

I

Men's

Shoe

Sale

Clearance of Men's Styles only.
A group of our summer or year-round weights -
All from our regular stocks of quality footwear made by-
FRENCH-SHRINER ... JOHNSTON & MURPHY-G. H. BASS-
WRIGHT ARCH PRESERVERS and BRITISH IMPORTS
A wide range of colors, styles and leathers to select from
and every shoe is a tremendous value in today's market.
IN THREE PRICE GROUPS:

FAVORITE PASTIME-Crowded quarters were available for the
NROTC shipmen, but there doesn't appear to be any hammocks.
The gobs even said the bunks were fairly comfortable.

A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE-The U.S.S. Newport News' heavy
artillery, eight-inch guns mounted on turrets, are visible evidence
of the ship's readiness for action.

i

$500

$995

X1495

All Sales Final -No Returns -No Exchanges
(Begins Friday at 9:00 A.M.)

::..

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