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July 21, 1956 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-07-21

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Y, JULY 21, 1956

TRY, M G2ikN DAILY

PAGN TRRIM

F', JULY 21, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAII~Y PAGE mm

S. PROBLEM:

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May Abandon Iceland Base
vcl-he ge rd zin Jane elections,.'
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Gives Titles
Of Emeritus

Eight Leaves of Absence

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By DAVID L. BOWEN
Associated Press Newsfeature Writer
For the first time since the birth
of the grand alliance of the West
to contain Russia through a net-
work of global bases and mutual
security treaties, the United States
is faced with the possibility of hav-
ing to abandon one of its overseas
outposts.
On the strategically located is-
land of Iceland-a republic which
is a full member of the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization-an
election late last month increased
the parliamentary strength of
parties committed to a policy of
sending home American troops.
The anti-American parties did not
gain a clear mandate, but won
enough seats to heavily influence
the Island's future policy.
Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles has avoided saying specifi-
cally whether the election will re-
sult in withdrawal of all troops
from Iceland. He has admitted
the vote may make it necessary to
cut down on the number of per-
sonnel stationed there. It seems
obvious that a direct demand,
which may not be made, would
require all to go.
The Icelanders cite economic rea-
sons, such as above-standard
wages, for their desire to be rid
of the airbase at Keflavik. Some
observers believe, however, that
rising nationalism, social friction,
and Iceland's traditional isola-'
tionism, are more important fac-
tors.

The prevalence of these same
conditions in other parts of the
world has caused Senator Henry
M. Jackson (D-Wash.) to raise
the question of how long the cur-
rent world political situaton will
permit operation of many other
American bases on foreign soil.
At present the United States
maintains a total of 950 installa-
tions overseas, the most important
of which are shown on the accom-
panying map. The maintenance
costs comes to more than 600
million dollars a year and the
bases are manned by some 1,400,-
000 men. In the wake of the Ice-
land election, Dulles was quoted as
telling senators the United States
might have to "readjust" its sights
TU' Regents
OK Faculty
Appointments
(Continued from Page 1)
M. G. Rutten were appointed
Netherlands Visiting Professors to
the University. .
The appointments were made
under a plan in existence since
1950 several years under which
the cost of the visiting professor-
ships is shared by the University
and the Netherlands Government.
Dr. Fortuyn will be Netherlands
Visiting Professor in the Medical
School's Department of Anatomy
for Jan. to June of 1957.
Prof. Rutten will be in the de-
partment of geology in the LS and
A School for the year 1957-58.
Appointees to the faculty of
Flint College include Edward T.
Claver, Robert Henry Cojean, C.
Paul Bradley and Alfred C. Raph-
leson.
Calver was appointed associate
professor of English, effective
Sept. 1, 1956 while Cojean was
named associate professor of
business administration, begin-
ning with the 1956-57 year.
Bradley was appointed assis-
tant professor of political science
and Raphleson was appointed as-
sistant professor of psychology,
both for three-year terms, 1956-59
effective Sept. 1, 1956.
Study Program
A five-year cooperative program
of study between Kent State Uni-
versity of Ohio and The Univer-
sity of Michigan School of Natural
Resources was given by the Regents
at their July meeting yesterday.
Under the program, a Bachelor
of Science degree in Biology will
be given by Kent State University
upon the successful completion of
the prescribed three years at Kent
State and one year at the Univer-
sity.

as to the number of troops sta-
tioned at some of the bases.-
There doesn't seem to be much
danger of those American installa-
tions operated in cooperation with
equal allies, as in Britain, France,
Italy and other major powers,
The situation is different where
American bases have been more
or less imposed on people who
have to live with them-such as
those in North Africa and at Oki-
nawa. The fires of Arab national-
ism burning so fiercely in the,
Middle East are too highly emo-
tional to preclude the possibility
they might not be turned against
Americans, as they have already
been directed at the British. In
Asia, Japanese nationalists have]
begun their first whisperingsf
against contnued American occu-
pation of Okinawa,
British overseas bases are under
a far heavier threat than Ameri-
ca's. Forced out of Egypt, Britain
is maintaining its position on Cy-
prus only through the use of force.
Ceylon replaced a strong pro-
Western premier earlier this year
with one who aims at making that
commonwealth island neutral. The
new premier, Solomon Bandarana-
ike, claimed they would abandon{
their valuable bases in the Indian
Ocean. Britain also is faced with+
serious trouble in Singapore.
The new temper of the Cold1
War already has caused NATO to'
begin a reappraisal of its function
in light of an apparent shift of the
struggle between East and WestI
from a military to an economicI
battleground.
3lore F"oreign
Students Here
The total foreign student enroll-
ment at the University for thet
Summer Session numbers 521 stu-
dents as compared with 480 last
summer, accordng to M. Robert
Klinger, counselor in the Interna-
tional Center.
"This summer= there are 68 poli-
tical entities instead of last sum-
mer's 63," Klinger reports. The
increase he said, is due to in-
creased numbers from the Far
East which is represented by 204
students over 189 last summer.
Latin America numbers 123 over
100; the British Commonwealth 93
over 70. This last is partially off-
set by a slight decrease in Europe
and Africa of 52 down from 61.
The Near East has 49 students
down from 51 last summer.
Among countries represented by
more than 20 students, Canada
stilt leads with 79 compared to-
64 a year ago. Second comes India
with 45 compared to 28 last year
at this time. Venezuela is third
with 33, up from 25.
Thailand holds fourth place with
32 up from 25. Others are China,
26 down from 28; Philippines 22,
as compared to 38 a year ago;
Japan 21, up from 13; and Burma
20, down from 28.

Emeritus titles were conferred
on 14 members of the University
faculty by the Regents at their
July meeting yesterday.
Ernest Franklin Barker wasj
made professor emeritus of phys-
ics. He became 70 on March 16,
1956.
Harley Harris Bartlett, who be-
came 70 March 9, 1956, was made
professor emeritus of botany and
director emeritus of the Botanical
Gardens.
Orlan William Boston, who re-
quested retirement at the age of
65, was made professor emeritus
of mechanical engineering and
production engineering.
Everett Somerville Brown reach-
ed the age of 70 on May 2, 1956
and he was made professor emeri-
tus of political science. He joined
the faculty in 1921.
Thirty-five years of service to'
the University were contributed by
Lowell Juilliard Carr, who became
70 on Dec. ^12, 1955. The Regents
have given him the title of pro-
fessor emeritus of sociology.
Dr. Warren Ellsworth Forsythe,
who was 70 on Nov. 8, 1955, was
given the titles of professor emeri-
tue ofdhygiene and public health
and director emeritue of the
Health Service.
ology.
Henry Wilbur Hann, who joined
the faculty in 1929, was made as-
sistant professor emeritus of zo-
ology.
Edwin Richard Martin joined
the faculty of the College of En-
gineering in 1947 after 22 years in
the industrial field as an electri-
cal machine designer. He was giv-
en the title of professor emeritus
of electrical engineering.
Veteran member of the emeritus
group was Ferdinand Northrup
Mnefee, who served for 46 years.
The Regents conferred on him the
title of professor emeritus of en-
gineering mechanics. He became
70 on January 7, 1956.
Charles Thomas Olmsted, who
was 70 on October 29, 1955, was
made associate professor emeritus
of engineering mechanics.
The title of professor emeritus
of mathematics was given to
George Yuri Rainich, who joined
the faculty in 1926 and became
70 on March 25, 1956.
Byron Avery Soule, who re-
quested retirement at the age of
65, was given the title of associate,
professor emeritus of chemistry.
Jesse Earl Thornton, who joinedE
the faculty of the College of En-
gineering in 1914 and became 70
on June 2, 1956, was made pro-
fessor emeritus of English. !
Harry James Watson, who
joined the faculty in 1916, was
made professor emeritus of me-
chanical engineering. He became
70 on October 19, 1956.I

Eight leaves of absence were
granted, one off-campus duty as-1
signment was approved and a re-
quest to have a sabbatical leaveZ
canceled was approved by the Re-
gents of the University at their
July meeting yesterday.
Approval was given to the off-
campus assignment given to Al-1
bert C. Spaulding, curator in the
Museum of Anthropology and as-
sociate professor in the depart-
ment of anthropology. He is con-f
ducting an archaelogical survey
in the Upper Peninsula of Michi-
gan which will extend until Aug. i
20.
A request from the College of
Literature, Science and the Arts
that the sabbatical leave granteds
to Prof. W. J. McKeachie of the,
department of psychology for the
first semester of 1956-57 be can-f
celed was approved. The college
reported that Prof. McKeachie's
services would be urgently need-
ed this fall.
The leaves of absence went to:
Goes to California
Roger C. Lyndon, associate pro-
fessor of mathematics, who was
granted a leave, without salary,
for the 1956-57 academic year.
He has been invited to serve as;
visiting associate professor at the
University of California.
H. Richard Blackwell, associate
professor of psychology, was
granted a one-fourth time leave
from his appointment in the de-
partment of psychology of the
College of LS & A and a one-half
time leave from his appointment
in the Medical School's depart-
ment of opthalmology for the
1956-57 year. The leave will per-
mit him to continue to direct the
Vision and Optics Division of
Project Michigan.
Henry L. Bretten, assistant pro-
fessor of political science, was
granted a leave, without salary,
for the University year 1956-57.
He has been granted a Fulbright

U.S. specialist under the Inter-
national Education Exchange Ser-
vice of the State Department and
will visit dental schools in Swe_-
den, Norway and Denmark.
Goes to Harvard
John P. Dawson, professor of
law, was granted leave, without
salary, for the University year
1956-57, so that he may accept
appointment as visiting professor
for one year at the Harvard Law
School+
B. James George, Jr., associate,
professor of law, was granted
leave for the 1956-57 University
year in order that he may be ap-
pointed to a research professor-
ship at the Kyoto (Japan) Uni-
versity Law School.
This appointment is part of
the Japanese-American program
for co-operation in legal studies
in which the University, Harvard
and Stanford law schools are
participating jointly. Prof. George
is receiving a Fulbright grant from
the State Department and a Ford
Foundation grant to cover his
salary and travel expenses,
Arlene L. Sollenberger, instruc-
tor in voice in the School of Mu-
sic, was granted a leave for the
1956-57 year, without salary, so
that she may accept a Fulbright
Grant for voice study in Munich,
Germany.
William C. Gibson, associate
professor of public health engi-
neering and secretary of the facul-
ty in the School of Public Health,
was granted a sabbatical leave
from Feb. 1, 1956 through July
31, 1957. The leave will permit him
to prepare for publication a
textbook on the planning and ad-
ministration of public health en-
gineering programs.
Top Executive
1i 1 ~U ' _AQ ,'.

1951 FORD-2-door, Fordomatic.
and Heater. Best offer. Phone
8758 after 6 p.m.

1951 HOUSE TRAILER-3-rooms,C it-
chen, Living and Bedrooms. coi-,
pletely furnished, 30 ft. 2 bottle gas
tanks, heated with fuel oil. Very good
condition. $2,500 cash, NO-2-9020. )B
TRANSPORTATION
RIDER-Wanted, to accompany mother
and twin boys to New York, New
Haven airea around Aug. 12. Call any
day 1;00-3:00 PM. or after 6:00 P.M.
NO 3-6154, )G
BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING-Theses, term papers, etc.
Reasonable rates, prompt service. 830
South Main, NO 8-7590. )J
GRADUATE STUDENT - from Spain,
wishes to tutor or teach Spanish. Call
NO 3-5957. )J
WASHINGS, finished work, ironing sep-
arately! Specialize on cotton dresses,
blouses, wash skirts. Free pick-up and
delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. )J
SIAMESE CAT Stud Service, Registered.
Mrs. Peterson's Cattery, NO 2-9020. )J

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .75 1.87 2.78
3 .90 2.25 3.33
4 1.04 2.60 3.85
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
FOR SALE

SITUATION WANTED
SECOND World War veteran wants per-
manent night janitor or night watch-
man work. Reliabla NO-2-9020. )S
FOR RE%,IT
SINGLE ROOM with board and garage
privileges for gentlemen. Also a suite
f or two. Call NO 8-7230. }C

Radiol
NO 3-
1B$

USED CARS
1953 OLDSMOBILE, 98 Holiday, in like-
new condition. Radio, Heater, Full
power. autronic eye, white wall tires.
Excellent condition, Low mileage, by
owner. Ypsl 2812J after 6 p.m. )N
CARS FOR RENT
AVIS RENT-A-CAR or VAN for local or
long distance use. Reasonable. Daily,
weekly or hourly rates. Nye Motor
Sales Inc. 514 E. Washington St. NO-
3-4156.
ROOMS FOR RENT
CAMPUS APARTMENTS, 3 and 4 Adults
3 and 4 Rooms, nicely decorated and
furnished. Private bath. Call NO 2-
0035 or 8-6205, or 3-4594. )D
HELP WANTED
ASSISTANT TO NURSERY TEACHER
SMon., Wed., and Fri. mornings nlext
fall. Beth Israel Nursery, NO 2-6188.
)H3
WAITRESS OR WAITER-part time.
Evenings and/or weekends. Call in
person at the Virginitan, 313 8. Stat.
PART-TIME service station man. Week-
ends and nights. Inquire at 101
Beakes St. )H

--------

4675 Washtenaw Ave.
This Evening
"FEMALE ON THE
BEACH"

6588 Jackson Rd.

Tonight -
"RED SUNDOWN"

Fellowship for lectures and study '71 u [1 wea ves
at the University of Innsbruck,
Austria. UV uonvention f
Dr. Robert E. Moyers, profes-
sor of dentistry and head of the A total of 53 top executives from
department of orthodontics of the all over the world headed for home
School of Dentistry, was granted yesterday after their "super-con-
leave from Aug. 14 to Sept. 14. He vention" on the University campus.an
has been invited to serve kas a They had been gathered here Saturday at71
for four weeks of intensive study
' dopt Memoir g of top management problems inSunday at.o nl0y
s ethe Executive Development Pro-
A memoir expressing their re- gram sponsored by the School of " O T B E
grets over the death of Lawrencef Business Administration. I U V A IL
Preuss, professor of political They were glad to reveal their
science, was adopted by the Uni- impressions of the program just!
versity Regents at their July meet- before leaving to get back on 'the with MEE FRK EK
ing yesterday. job. "We learned to understand
Prof. Preuss died July 7 at the the other fellow's problems," they
age of 51. He held three degrees agreed. "And to avoid having sales .
from the University and had been suffer because a higher executive
on the faculty since 1926. is a production man."

r action m rModernGooling
Saturday and Sunday only
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Dial NO 2-2513

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also
"MR. MAGOO
GOES WEST"
U.P.A. Cartoon
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Thu~sda1

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WATCH
next Wednesday and Thursday

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