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July 21, 1956 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1956-07-21

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I

PAGE FOUR

mrTff
E MICMG DAILY

SA nDAY, Y 21. 1958

PAGE POUR TUE MICHIGAN DAILY MATTTI1IIAV iTTI.V91 IOP~*

VA 1 .'1 LAl J viux 41, 1Ja"

IV

Ford Ties Strikeout lark as

Yan ikees

Win Again

V

'.r

Braves Trounce Phils in 10-0 Shutout;
Tigers Defeat Red Sox, 9-6, on 15 Hits

T

MacKay Eliminated from Net Tourney,
Chosen for Davis Cup Matches in Canada

4,

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Ed "Whitey"
Ford tied an American League
record by striking out six batters
in a row last night and gained his
12th victory of the season as the
New York Yankees defeated the
Kansas City Athletics, 6-2, widen-
ing their first place bulge to 11
game.
Ford, a 27-year-old southpaw,
became the seventh hurler to
match the league record hung up
by Detroit's Bill Donovan in 1908
by fanning Joe Ginsberg, Joe
DeMaestri, Cletus Boyer, Hector
Lopez and Al Pilarcik.
He then hit Enos Slaughter on
the next pitch. Ginsberg's called
third strike ended the second in-
ning. The, major league record for
consecutive strikeouts is nine.
Ford added only two more strike-
outs the rest of the way.
The Yankees, enjoying their best
lead of the season after coupling
ther 60th victory with a rainout
that idled runnerup Cleveland at
Baltimore, got to A's hurler Jack
McMahan for a run in the first
inning, then wrapped it up with
four in the fifth.
Braves 10, Phils 0
MILWAUKEE -- Fastball right-
hander Bob Buhl threw a two hit
shutout and Henry Aaron and
Toby Atwell smashed home runs
to give the first place Milwaukee
Braves a 10-0 victory over the
Philadelphia Phillies.
Buhl, in taking his 12th victory
against four defeats, permitted
only two singles. Granny Hamner
got one in the third and Richie
Ashburn collected his in the sixth.
The lean righthander struck out
six 'and walked five.
The victory kept the Braves two
games ahead of the second place
Cincinnati Redlegs who beat the
Pittsburgh Pirates, 6-4, in 12 in-
nings. It was Milwaukee's tenth
victory in 11 starts since the All
Star game.
The Phillies, in sixth place, got
three innings of good pitching from
* reliefer Ben Flowers, but it came
too late.
The Braves landed on starter
Stu Miller, a former tormentor, for
two runs in the first inning as
Aaron, the National League's lead-
ing hitter, smashed his 13th homer
with Eddie Mathews on base.
Tigers 9, Red Sox 6
BOSTON-The Detroit Tigers,
led by heavy-hitting Charlie Max-
well, ruined Boston's Joe Cronin
Hall of Fame recognition night
by blasting out 15 hits for a 9-6
victory over the third-place Red
Box.
Maxwell, who once wore a Boston
uniform, boosted his batting aver-
age to .354 with three hits in four
official times at bat. He also had
a sacrifice fly and drove in two
runs.
Cronin, once a great Boston
shortstop now the club's general
manager, was honored by sports
notables, public officials, friends
and fans before the game. He re-
ceived a new car and cash gifts to
be turned over to the Children's
Cancer Research Foundation Jim-
my Fund.-
Cronin and Hank Greenberg will
be inducted into baseball's Hall of
Fame at Cooperstown, N. Y., Mon-
day.'
Redlegs 6, Pirates 4 J
CINCINNATI - Catcher Smoky
Burgess smacked a two-run homers

WHITEY FORD
. . . Strikeout artistry

behind, 4-0, before they could
score.
Cincinnati pulled even on a
three-run homer by Ted Kluszew-
ski in the fifth inning and a four-
base blast by Wally Post in the
seventh.
* * *
Dodgers 4, Cards I
ST. LOUIS-Big Don Newcombs
held St. Louis to five hits and ig-
nited a three-run surge in the
third inning to lead the Brooklyn
Dodgers to a 4-1 triumph over the
Cardinals for his 13th victory.
Peewee Reese of the Dodgers had
four hits, including a solo home
run in the fifth.
Newcombe's triumph was his
seventh straight over St. Louis
since August 1951. The husky
righthander, beaten five times
this season, was bothered only by
Stan Musial, who walloped his
17th homer, a single, walked and
lined out in four official trips as
he boosted his average to .331.
The Dodgers hammered 10 hits
off righthanders Tom Poholsky,
Lindy McDaniel and Larry Jack-
son, pinning an eighth setback on
Poholsky, a five-game winner.
* * *
Cubs 7, Giants 4
CHICAGO-The Chicago Cubs
handed the New York Giants their
10th loss in the 11 games of their
current western junket, 7-4, in the
opener of a four game series be-
fore 6,318 fans yesterday.
Ex-Giant Monte Irvin smashed
two homers, his 9th and 10th, and
a single to help the Cubs defeat
his old New York teammates.
Although starter Jim Brosnan
retired in the seventh inning, the
Cubs' righthander was credited
with his third win against four
losses. Lefty Jimmy Davis finished
up.
Johnny McCall of the Giants
drew his third loss. He was suc-
ceeded by Jim Hearn and Hoyt
Wilhelm.
* * *
Two Postponements
Rain caused postponement of
last night's American League
games involving Cleveland at Bal-
timore and Chicago at Washing-
ton.

PEEWEE REESE
... four hits for Dodgers

BARRY MacKAY
... defeat and honor

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO -- Barry MacKay,
Michigan's Big Ten tennis cham-
pion was eliminated by top-seeded
Art Larsen of San Leandro, Calif.,
10-8, 6-4 in yesterday's third
round of the National Clay Courts
Tennis Tournament.
Later Larsen was upset in the
quarter-finals by Sammy Giam-
malva of Houston. Tex., 7-5, 6-8,
6-3 in a near two-hour match.
Sixth-seeded Giammalva, out-
hit and out-ran Larsen with a
consistent attack that combined
amazing court-covering ability.
Larsen took a 4-1 lead in the
second set, and although Giam-
malva tied it at 5-5, the Califor-
nian rallied to win it. -
In the third set, Giammalva
forced the play against the tiring
Larsen. He took the lead, stretched
it to 5-2, then 5-3, then game
at 6-3.

ti

Bernard "Tut" Bartzen, the
number two seed from Dallas, thus
assumed the role of favorite.
Bartzen moved into the semi-
finals by knocking off Alenjando
Olmedo, the national collegiate
champion from Los Angeles, 6-1,
6-4.
Olmedo, unseeded, had defeated
eight-seeded Allen Morris, Jr., of
Atlanta earlier in the day.
Both Shirley Fry, the first seed
in the women's division and the
Wimbledon champion, and Althea
Gibson, second seed from New
York City, turned in easy victories.
Miss Fry, registering out of St.
Petersburg, Fla., entered the semi-
finals by whipping Barbara Green,
North Hollywood, Calif., 6-0, 6-2,
and Miss Gibson entered the quar-
ter-finals with a 6-2, 6-1, triumph
over Gwen Thomas, Cleveland,
Ohio.

BOLT UPSET:
Most Favorites Win
First Rounds in PGA

Davis Cup Team
NEW YORK - Michigan's Bar-
ry MacKay is one of two newcom-
ers named Thursday to the four
man United States team for next
week's North American zone Davis
Cup matches against Canada at
Victoria, B. C.
MacKay and Ronald Holmberg
of Brooklyn are expected to join
in the doubles, while veterans
Ham Richardson and Herb Flam
play in the singles matches. It
will be the first Davis Cup com-
petition for both MacKay and
Holmberg.

HENRY AARON
. another hot Brave hitter
in the 12th inning, powering Cin-
cinnati's Redlegs to a 6-4 victory
over the Pittsburgh Pirates.
The four-base hit, scoring rookie
Frank Robinson ahead of Burgess,
broke a 4-4 tie that had existed
for four innings.
Home runs accounted for all the
runs for the Redlegs, who were

CAIJTON, Mass. (R) - Charles
Prentice, unknown from Colum-
bia, S. C., upset Tommy Bolt, 1 up
yesterday to fracture the other-
wise calm and formful first round
of the Professional Golfers Asso-
ciation chimpionship.
Bolt got behind at the first hole,
pulled ahead twice but lost with
a scattershot finish which saw
him take five's on the last two
holes.
"Leave me alone - I don't want
to talk to anybody," Bolt blurted,
as he grabbed his bags and left
in a huff.
Ford, Snead Advance
Defending champion Doug Ford
and three-time winner Sam Snead
led a phalanx of favorites forward
in other opening matches over the
6.634-yard par 71 Blue Hill Coun-
try Club course.
Ford, from Yonkers, N. Y.,
turned back Buddy Viar of South
Charleston, W. Va., 3 and 2,
while Snead rallied to oust Jack
Weitzel of Columbus, Ohio, 2 and
1.
Others to advance into the 64-
man second round were Masters
Champion Jackie Burke, Jr., for-
mer National Open champions
Lew Worsham and Ed Furgol;
and such headline tournament
pros as Walter Burkemo, Chick
Harbert, Dick Mayer, Jimmy De-
maret and Shelly Mayfield.
Harbert Tops Williams
Harbert, 1954 PGA champion
from Northville, Mich., had to
scramble to beat Henry Williams
Jr., of Fleetwood, Pa., on the 20th
hole of an overtime match.
Al Smith of Danville, Va., took
a 22-hole marathon from Vic
Ghezzi, 1941 champion.
Prentice defeated Bolt by re-
fusing to scare and by letting the
trigger-tempered Houston pro
blow himself out of the match.
Bolt Loses Two in Row
One up with two holes to play,

Bolt hit his drive into the woods
on No. 17 and lost to a par four.
Then on the 18th he drove into
the rough and pitched into a trap,
losing the match to Prentice's
birdie four-two shots to the edge
of the green and two to get down.
Ford didn't lose a hole in his
match with Viar, shooting even
par for the 16 holes he played.
Snead was off to a shaky start
against Weitzel. The slammer lost
two of the first four holes before
bringing his big game into range
and finishing one under par for
17 holes.

1 T

Come

to Church

Sundcay

$

Knight Add
To Football

Is

i I I

Major League Scores

1

i

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct
New York 60 28 .692
Cleveland 47 37 .560
Boston 47 39 .547
Chicago 44 38 .537
Baltimore 40 45 .471
Detroit 39 47 .453
Washington 35 54 .393
Kansas City 31 55 .360
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at New York
Detroit at Boston
Cleveland at Baltimore (2)
Chicago at Washington (N)

NATIONAL LEAGUE

GB
11
12
13
18
20
25%j
28

Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Brooklyn
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Philadelphia
New York

W
51
50
46
41
38
37
39
31

L
31
34
38
43
44
46
47
50

Pct GB
.522-
.595 2?
.548 6
.488 11
.463 13
.446 14/
.453 14
.383 19%'

TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Milwaukee
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati
New York at Chciago
Brooklyn at St. Louis

Controversy
SACRAMENTO, Calif. tJ)}-Gov.
Goodwin Knight yesterday in-
jected the name of Stanford - his
old alma mater -into the Pacific
Coast Conference athletic contro-
versy.
He said ex-Indian gridders, a
"great many" in fact, have in-
formed him they were paid for
performing "fictitious tasks" while
attending and playing football
for the university.
At Press Conference
Knight's remarks, made at a
press conference,. drew a prompt
suggestion that perhaps the gov-
ernor had fumbled.
Al Masters, Stanford's athletic
director, said the governor "ex-
aggerated the situation," that he
ought to journey to Palo Alto "to
see exactly what we are doing."
Masters, however, acknowledged
that "there may be an occasional
case where a boy is not putting
enough time on his job."
Repeat of Charges
The governor said Raymond B.
Allen, UCLA chancellor, made
similar charges against Stanford,
charges Knight said were never
denied.
The governor recalled he and
others spoke out after the PCC
slapped fines and suspensions on
UCLA and Washington and that
subsequently the PCC acted
against USC and California.
Earlier in the week, Knight had
come to the defense of his Calif-
ornia schools in their troubles
with the PCC. He promised sup-
port for any move to dissolve the
Coast Conference and to create
an all-California athletic league
with less stringent eligibility rules.

SPORTS SHORTS:
Misses Lesser, Quast Gain Golf Finals

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 6:30 A.M., 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M.,
9:00 A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. -11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdohl,
William B. Hutchinson, Eugene A. Ransom
Ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship sermon, "Where
Are You?" by Eugene A. Ransom.
9:30 A.M. Discussion group topic: "Problems of
Christian Belief."
2:00 P.M. Meet in Wesley lounge for a picnic out-
ing.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service.
7.00 Evening Service.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10:00 A.M. Sunday school classes.
11:00 A.M. "The Return of Christ."'
7:00 P.M. "An Unfinished Story."
7:30 P.M. Wednesday-Prayer Meeting.
We Welcome You.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Win. S. raker, University Pastor
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday Morning Worship at 9:15 and 11:00 A.M.
Summer Fellowship for Students and Young Adults,
meet at 5:30 for supper and to hear Professor
Howard McClusky speak on "Liberty or Li-
cense?"
Patricia Pickett will be in the student office 12-
2 P.M., Monday through Thursday.
Bible Study, "The Apostle Paul." Wednesday, July
25th, at 8 o'clock.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion at St. Andrews
Church (Followed by breakfast and speaker at
Canterbury House),
9:00 A.M. Family Service.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:00 P.M. Picnic. Cars leave from Canterbury
House.
8:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and Commentary
(chapel).
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Arthur Zillgitt, Asst. Pastor.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon by Asst. Pas-
tor Arthur Zillgitt.
1:30 P.M. Student Guild Meeting.
FRIENDS '(QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
9:30 and 10:45 A.M.-Meeting for Worship.
9:30 A.M.-Child care,
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Church School classes up to 6th grade, 10:45 A.M.
Public Worship 10:45. Subject: "Only Seven."
Speaker: Prof. L. LaMont Okey.
Student Guild 7:00 P.M. Speaker: Mr. M.C.A.
Boukai of Palestine. "P'roblems Facing the Mid-
dIe East."
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron.
Chester H.dLoucks and Duane L. Day. Min-
isters. Student Advisor: Beth Mahone,
10:00 A.M. Student Bible Study.
11:00 A.M. Reverend Day's sermon will be "None
Shall Separate Us."
2:00 P.M. Roger Williams Guild will meet in the
Guild House to go together to Silver Lake for their
program, a swim and a picnic supper.
Charles Mahone will review Sigmund Freud's
"Moses and Monotheism."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister.
Sunday 8:00 P.M.-The Honorable WADE Mc-
CREE, Wayne Court Circuit Judge, will speak
on, "Twentieth Century Reconstruction."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sunday, 11 A.M.
Wednesday, 8 P.M., Testimony Meeting.
Sunday School, 9:30 A.M.
Reading Room, 339 South Main.
Tuesday to Saturday, 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Monday,
11 A.M. to 9 P.M.; Sunday, 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.

I I

s

By The Associated Press
HUNTINGTON. W. Va. - Pat
Lesser, the defending champion
from Seattle. and Anne Quast, the
medalist from Everett, Wash.,
proved the late pressure winners
yesterday to go into today's golf-
ing finals of the Women's Western
Amateur.
Two down after 10 holes in a
see-saw semi-final match, the 23-

Johnson Loses in 10th Round
In Madison Square Garden

year-old Miss Lesser won, 2 tip, by
taking four of the last five holes
from Mary Patton Janssen, inter-
national competitor and British
amateur runner-up, who faltered
badly.
Miss Quast's steady par golf on
-the last seven holes produced a
3 and 1 victory over Berridge Long,
the local pride and hope.
* *
Greek Game Favored
CHICAGO, - The combination
of Greek Game, unbeaten in three
starts, and Bill Hartack, nation's
leading jockey, yesterday appar-
ently scared off many rivals and
only six other 2-year-olds were
entered -in today's $140,850 Ar-
lington Futurity.
If all go to the post, the 27th
running of the six-furlongs fea-

ture at Arlington Park will be
worth $84,410 to the winner. Sec-
ond place money is $30,000, third
$15,000 and fourth $10,000.
**, * *
Hollywood Park Race
INGLEWOOD, Calif., - Eleven
candidates, topped by Robert Leh-
man's Count of Honor and Rex
Ellsworth's Terrang, were en-
tered in today's $75,000 added
Westerner, a mile and one-quarter
fixture for the leading 3-year-olds
running at Hollywood Park.

F

7

NEW YORK GP)-Tony Anthony
pounded out a 10-round technical
knockout over Tony Johison last
night in a light heavyweight match
at Madison Square Garden.
There were no knockdowns in
the fight, but Anthony had put
on such a late round barrage of
punches that Johnson could not
move away from the ropes.. An-
thony had slipped to the canvas
twice during the fight, but got
up without receiving a count.
Anthony, a 21-year-old grad of
the amateur ranks, made his re-
cord 27 victories in 31 fights.
Twenty-seven of his triumphs were
via the knockout route.
The 6'1" winner was favored
over the stocky Jc.hnson who gave
away three inches in height and
couldn't match Anthony's punch-
ing power.
Johnson's record is now 23-8-8,

including only eight knockouts. He
was sent down for the count only
once before by Paddy Young last
year.

_
"zxca ia4 .

5

se]

the'

C MAIN OFFICE
101-107 S. Main St.
# NICKELS ARCADE
330 S. State Street
* NEAR 'ENGINE ARCH'
1108 South University
* PACKARD-BROCKMAN
1923 Packard
* WHITMORE LAKE
9571 N. Main St.
FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES .. *

I

11

campus

SHOP SATURDAY
AT WAGNER'S
OPEN 9 t 5:30
Haspel cotton and wash'n'wear cords,
PALM BEACH washable and tropical weight

41

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LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. & South Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:30 A.M.-Bible Stidy on Galatians
10:30 A.M. Worship Service with Holy Com-
munion.
6:00 Supper.
7:00 P.M. Panel Discussion on Japan-Led
by Four Lutheran Japanese Students.
Tuesday-7:30 P.M. Class-Teachings of De-
nominations (Episcopal & Methodist).

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets.
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Guest Speaker: Mr. Mar-
vin Jewell: GATES AND DOORS.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
THE CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES STU.

'C

Ann Arbor Bank can help your

,r r . r. . .. !

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